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7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT) 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality. Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality.

Subjects

amino acids | amino acids | carboxyl group | carboxyl group | amino group | amino group | side chains | side chains | polar | polar | hydrophobic | hydrophobic | primary structure | primary structure | secondary structure | secondary structure | tertiary structure | tertiary structure | quaternary structure | quaternary structure | x-ray crystallography | x-ray crystallography | alpha helix | alpha helix | beta sheet | beta sheet | ionic bond | ionic bond | non-polar bond | non-polar bond | van der Waals interactions | van der Waals interactions | proton gradient | proton gradient | cyclic photophosphorylation | cyclic photophosphorylation | sunlight | sunlight | ATP | ATP | chlorophyll | chlorophyll | chlorophyll a | chlorophyll a | electrons | electrons | hydrogen sulfide | hydrogen sulfide | biosynthesis | biosynthesis | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | photosystem II | photosystem II | photosystem I | photosystem I | cyanobacteria | cyanobacteria | chloroplast | chloroplast | stroma | stroma | thylakoid membrane | thylakoid membrane | Genetics | Genetics | Mendel | Mendel | Mendel's Laws | Mendel's Laws | cloning | cloning | restriction enzymes | restriction enzymes | vector | vector | insert DNA | insert DNA | ligase | ligase | library | library | E.Coli | E.Coli | phosphatase | phosphatase | yeast | yeast | transformation | transformation | ARG1 gene | ARG1 gene | ARG1 mutant yeast | ARG1 mutant yeast | yeast wild-type | yeast wild-type | cloning by complementation | cloning by complementation | Human Beta Globin gene | Human Beta Globin gene | protein tetramer | protein tetramer | vectors | vectors | antibodies | antibodies | human promoter | human promoter | splicing | splicing | mRNA | mRNA | cDNA | cDNA | reverse transcriptase | reverse transcriptase | plasmid | plasmid | electrophoresis | electrophoresis | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | primer | primer | template | template | capillary tube | capillary tube | laser detector | laser detector | human genome project | human genome project | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | clone | clone | primer walking | primer walking | subcloning | subcloning | computer assembly | computer assembly | shotgun sequencing | shotgun sequencing | open reading frame | open reading frame | databases | databases | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase | polymerase | nucleotides | nucleotides | Thermus aquaticus | Thermus aquaticus | Taq polymerase | Taq polymerase | thermocycler | thermocycler | resequencing | resequencing | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | pre-implantation diagnostics | pre-implantation diagnostics | forensics | forensics | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | DNA sequences | DNA sequences | therapeutic proteins | therapeutic proteins | E. coli | E. coli | disease-causing mutations | disease-causing mutations | cleavage of DNA | cleavage of DNA | bacterial transformation | bacterial transformation | recombinant DNA revolution | recombinant DNA revolution | biotechnology industry | biotechnology industry | Robert Swanson | Robert Swanson | toxin gene | toxin gene | pathogenic bacterium | pathogenic bacterium | biomedical research | biomedical research | S. Pyogenes | S. Pyogenes | origin of replication | origin of replication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality.

Subjects

amino acids | carboxyl group | amino group | side chains | polar | hydrophobic | primary structure | secondary structure | tertiary structure | quaternary structure | x-ray crystallography | alpha helix | beta sheet | ionic bond | non-polar bond | van der Waals interactions | proton gradient | cyclic photophosphorylation | sunlight | ATP | chlorophyll | chlorophyll a | electrons | hydrogen sulfide | biosynthesis | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | photosystem II | photosystem I | cyanobacteria | chloroplast | stroma | thylakoid membrane | Genetics | Mendel | Mendel's Laws | cloning | restriction enzymes | vector | insert DNA | ligase | library | E.Coli | phosphatase | yeast | transformation | ARG1 gene | ARG1 mutant yeast | yeast wild-type | cloning by complementation | Human Beta Globin gene | protein tetramer | vectors | antibodies | human promoter | splicing | mRNA | cDNA | reverse transcriptase | plasmid | electrophoresis | DNA sequencing | primer | template | capillary tube | laser detector | human genome project | recombinant DNA | clone | primer walking | subcloning | computer assembly | shotgun sequencing | open reading frame | databases | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase | nucleotides | Thermus aquaticus | Taq polymerase | thermocycler | resequencing | in vitro fertilization | pre-implantation diagnostics | forensics | genetic engineering | DNA sequences | therapeutic proteins | E. coli | disease-causing mutations | cleavage of DNA | bacterial transformation | recombinant DNA revolution | biotechnology industry | Robert Swanson | toxin gene | pathogenic bacterium | biomedical research | S. Pyogenes | origin of replication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT) 7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT)

Description

Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current

Subjects

evolution | evolution | biocatalyst | biocatalyst | mutation | mutation | library | library | recombination | recombination | directed evolution | directed evolution | enzyme | enzyme | point mutation | point mutation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | DNA | DNA | gene | gene | complementation | complementation | affinity | affinity | phage | phage | ribosome display | ribosome display | yeast surface display | yeast surface display | bacterial cell surface display | bacterial cell surface display | IVC | IVC | FACS | FACS | active site | active site

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT) SP.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

Subjects

cooking | cooking | food | food | chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | extraction | extraction | denaturation | denaturation | phase change | phase change | capsicum | capsicum | biochemistry | biochemistry | chocolate | chocolate | cheese | cheese | yeast | yeast | recipe | recipe | jam | jam | pectin | pectin | enzyme | enzyme | dairy | dairy | molecular gastronomy | molecular gastronomy | salt | salt | colloid | colloid | stability | stability | liquid nitrogen | liquid nitrogen | ice cream | ice cream | biology | biology | microbiology | microbiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT) ES.SP.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

Subjects

cooking | cooking | food | food | chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | extraction | extraction | denaturation | denaturation | phase change | phase change | capsicum | capsicum | biochemistry | biochemistry | chocolate | chocolate | cheese | cheese | yeast | yeast | recipe | recipe | jam | jam | pectin | pectin | enzyme | enzyme | dairy | dairy | molecular gastronomy | molecular gastronomy | salt | salt | colloid | colloid | stability | stability | liquid nitrogen | liquid nitrogen | ice cream | ice cream | biology | biology | microbiology | microbiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT) ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes. Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

Subjects

cooking | cooking | food | food | chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | extraction | extraction | denaturation | denaturation | phase change | phase change | capsicum | capsicum | biochemistry | biochemistry | chocolate | chocolate | cheese | cheese | yeast | yeast | recipe | recipe | jam | jam | pectin | pectin | enzyme | enzyme | dairy | dairy | molecular gastronomy | molecular gastronomy | salt | salt | colloid | colloid | stability | stability | liquid nitrogen | liquid nitrogen | ice cream | ice cream | biology | biology | microbiology | microbiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.345 Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases (MIT) 7.345 Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases (MIT)

Description

How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker’s yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. T How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker’s yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. T

Subjects

human disease | human disease | yeast | yeast | nematodes | nematodes | fruit flies | fruit flies | zebrafish | zebrafish | mice | mice | rats | rats | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Fragile X syndrome | Fragile X syndrome | deafness | deafness | wound healing | wound healing | experimental organisms | experimental organisms | genetic models | genetic models | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Drosophila melanogaster | Drosophila melanogaster

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 To Divide or Not To Divide: Control of Cell Cycle and Growth by Extracellular Cues (MIT) 7.342 To Divide or Not To Divide: Control of Cell Cycle and Growth by Extracellular Cues (MIT)

Description

Cells, regardless of whether they are in an organ in the human body or a component of a bacterial colony, can sense the chemical composition of the environment, the presence of neighboring cells, and even the types of their neighboring cells. Depending on the identity of a cell and the information it receives from its environment, it can grow (increase in size), proliferate (make more cells), become quiescent (stop growing and dividing), differentiate (make different types of cells), or die. How cells achieve the astonishing feat of appropriately sensing and responding to their environment has been a major question in biology. In this course we will read and critically discuss the primary scientific literature with the goal of highlighting the basic principles of cell growth, adaptation, a Cells, regardless of whether they are in an organ in the human body or a component of a bacterial colony, can sense the chemical composition of the environment, the presence of neighboring cells, and even the types of their neighboring cells. Depending on the identity of a cell and the information it receives from its environment, it can grow (increase in size), proliferate (make more cells), become quiescent (stop growing and dividing), differentiate (make different types of cells), or die. How cells achieve the astonishing feat of appropriately sensing and responding to their environment has been a major question in biology. In this course we will read and critically discuss the primary scientific literature with the goal of highlighting the basic principles of cell growth, adaptation, a

Subjects

Cell growth | Cell growth | cell cycle | cell cycle | bacteria | bacteria | cell signaling | cell signaling | yeast | yeast | Genetic regulation | Genetic regulation | signaling pathways | signaling pathways | RAS | RAS | TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) | TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) | sporulation | sporulation | IME1 | IME1 | biofilms | biofilms

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 The Biology of Aging: Age-Related Diseases and Interventions (MIT) 7.342 The Biology of Aging: Age-Related Diseases and Interventions (MIT)

Description

Aging involves an intrinsic and progressive decline in function that eventually will affect us all. While everyone is familiar with aging, many basic questions about aging are mysterious. Why are older people more likely to experience diseases like cancer, stroke, and neurodegenerative disorders? What changes happen at the molecular and cellular levels to cause the changes that we associate with old age? Is aging itself a disease, and can we successfully intervene in the aging process?This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Ad Aging involves an intrinsic and progressive decline in function that eventually will affect us all. While everyone is familiar with aging, many basic questions about aging are mysterious. Why are older people more likely to experience diseases like cancer, stroke, and neurodegenerative disorders? What changes happen at the molecular and cellular levels to cause the changes that we associate with old age? Is aging itself a disease, and can we successfully intervene in the aging process?This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Ad

Subjects

Aging | Aging | age-related diseases | age-related diseases | molecular biology of aging | molecular biology of aging | calorie restriction | calorie restriction | resveratrol | resveratrol | rapamycin | rapamycin | Caloric restriction (CR) | Caloric restriction (CR) | Cellular senescence | Cellular senescence | telomerase | telomerase | progeroid syndromes | progeroid syndromes | mitochondrial DNA | mitochondrial DNA | yeast | yeast | C. elegans | C. elegans | Drosophila | Drosophila | Sirtuins | Sirtuins | SIR4 | SIR4 | target of rapamycin (TOR) | target of rapamycin (TOR) | oxidative damage | oxidative damage | Reactive oxygen species (ROS) | Reactive oxygen species (ROS) | National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program | National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program | Alzheimer’s disease | Alzheimer’s disease

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT) 7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT)

Description

The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in

Subjects

Engineering | Engineering | Microbial Systems | Microbial Systems | Biofuel Production | Biofuel Production | energy | energy | plant biomass | plant biomass | cellulose | cellulose | enzymes | enzymes | bacteria | bacteria | ethanol | ethanol | cellulolytic enzymes | cellulolytic enzymes | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | cellulases | cellulases | cellulosomes | cellulosomes | E. coli | E. coli | yeast | yeast

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.345 Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases (MIT)

Description

How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker’s yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. T

Subjects

human disease | yeast | nematodes | fruit flies | zebrafish | mice | rats | Parkinson's disease | Fragile X syndrome | deafness | wound healing | experimental organisms | genetic models | Huntington's disease | Drosophila melanogaster

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 To Divide or Not To Divide: Control of Cell Cycle and Growth by Extracellular Cues (MIT)

Description

Cells, regardless of whether they are in an organ in the human body or a component of a bacterial colony, can sense the chemical composition of the environment, the presence of neighboring cells, and even the types of their neighboring cells. Depending on the identity of a cell and the information it receives from its environment, it can grow (increase in size), proliferate (make more cells), become quiescent (stop growing and dividing), differentiate (make different types of cells), or die. How cells achieve the astonishing feat of appropriately sensing and responding to their environment has been a major question in biology. In this course we will read and critically discuss the primary scientific literature with the goal of highlighting the basic principles of cell growth, adaptation, a

Subjects

Cell growth | cell cycle | bacteria | cell signaling | yeast | Genetic regulation | signaling pathways | RAS | TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) | sporulation | IME1 | biofilms

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 The Biology of Aging: Age-Related Diseases and Interventions (MIT)

Description

Aging involves an intrinsic and progressive decline in function that eventually will affect us all. While everyone is familiar with aging, many basic questions about aging are mysterious. Why are older people more likely to experience diseases like cancer, stroke, and neurodegenerative disorders? What changes happen at the molecular and cellular levels to cause the changes that we associate with old age? Is aging itself a disease, and can we successfully intervene in the aging process?This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Ad

Subjects

Aging | age-related diseases | molecular biology of aging | calorie restriction | resveratrol | rapamycin | Caloric restriction (CR) | Cellular senescence | telomerase | progeroid syndromes | mitochondrial DNA | yeast | C. elegans | Drosophila | Sirtuins | SIR4 | target of rapamycin (TOR) | oxidative damage | Reactive oxygen species (ROS) | National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program | ?s disease

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Microorganisms of Medical Importance Part 2 - Microfungi and Protozoa

Description

An Articulate presentation providing information about the microfungi and protozoa. It also includes information about moulds, yeasts, fungal infections and reproduction. This is Part 2 of a series of 3. A help file is included and should be read first.

Subjects

microbiology | microfungi | protozoa | moulds | yeasts | fungal infections | fungal reproduction | ukoer | bioukoer | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT)

Description

The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in

Subjects

Engineering | Microbial Systems | Biofuel Production | energy | plant biomass | cellulose | enzymes | bacteria | ethanol | cellulolytic enzymes | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | cellulases | cellulosomes | E. coli | yeast

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT)

Description

Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current

Subjects

evolution | biocatalyst | mutation | library | recombination | directed evolution | enzyme | point mutation | mutagenesis | DNA | gene | complementation | affinity | phage | ribosome display | yeast surface display | bacterial cell surface display | IVC | FACS | active site

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

Subjects

cooking | food | chemistry | experiment | extraction | denaturation | phase change | capsicum | biochemistry | chocolate | cheese | yeast | recipe | jam | pectin | enzyme | dairy | molecular gastronomy | salt | colloid | stability | liquid nitrogen | ice cream | biology | microbiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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