RSS Feed for h http://solvonauts.org/%3Faction%3Drss_search%26term%3Dh RSS Feed for h Joseph Tombling, arrested for obtaining money by false pretences Name Joseph Tombling Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 4 February 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 63 Joseph Tombling The Shields Daily News for 10 February 1905 reports SERIOUS CHARGES AGAINST A NORTH SHIELDS YOUTH COLLECTING FOR A BOGUS CRICKET CLUB THREE MONTHS IMPRISONMENT At North Shields Police Court today Joseph Tomblin 17 was charged with having obtained by means of false pretences 2s 6d from Henry Dillon Irvin on the 1st inst with intent to cheat and defraud Prosecutor who resides at 9 Prudhoe Terrace Tynemouth said that on the 1st inst the prisoner came to his house and at his request was turned away Subsequently the accused met him in the street and asked him for a subscription towards the Tynemouth Boys Cricket Club He asked him to accompany him to his rooms Accused did so and there he put certain questions to him Prisoner produced a subscription list and said the club had made arrangements with the North Shields Athletic Association Football Club for the rental of their field On this representation he gave him 2s 6d and finding afterwards from inquiries that his statements were incorrect he applied for a warrant for his arrest He produced the list which bore his and several other names Septimus Crowell 39 Jackson Street who is secretary of the North Shields Athletic Club said he had never heard of such as club as the Tynemouth Boys Cricket Club Detective Sergt Scougal said he arrested the accused in Front Street Tynemouth on the night of the 3rd inst and charged him He made no reply He took him to the Tynemouth Divisional Police Station and upon searching him he found in his possession several lists produced In conversation the accused said he had collected the money shewn on the lists upon his own account There was no such club as the Tynemouth Boys Cricket Club An organization bearing this name did exist about five years ago but he was not a member of it On one of the lists appeared the name of A B Brown who was supposed to be the captain of the club Witness asked him who this person was and he replied that he did not know Some of the lists were dated three or four years back During that period the accused had been collecting money for a football club at one part of the year and for a cricket club at another Accused was formally charged He pleaded guilty and had nothing to say Prisoner was then charged with having obtained by means of false pretences 9d from Henry Jarvis Ward in the latter part of January Prosecutor who lives at No Albury Park Road said the accused came to his house in the latter part of January and told him that arrangements had been made for the renting of a field for the club and that all the money had been subscribed with the exception of 2s 6d Accused had been coming to him twice a year for at least for years collecting subscriptions for a football and a cricket club Detective Sergt Scougal proved the arrest and prisoner pleaded guilty A third charge was preferred against the accused of having obtained by similar means 5s from Coun Geo Stephenson steam trawler owner No 1 Park Crescent Accused said he only got 2s 6d The father of the accused was asked by the magistrates if he could account for his son s misconduct He blamed a certain religious body in Tynemouth the officials of which sent boys to collect subscriptions They did not give them officially signed papers or collecting books and this created a great temptation The Chairman Capt J Bolt said it was a very bad case The Bench however had decided to deal leniently with the accused He would have to go to prison in the second division for one month on each charge three months in all The Shields Daily News for 1 September 1905 reports ASSAULTS AT NORTH SHIELDS YOUNG MAN FINED At the North Shields Police Court today Joseph Tombling a young man residing at 25 Edith Street Spital Dene was summoned for having assaulted Mrs Jane Mitchell who resides in the same thoroughfare and her daughter Jane Mitchell on the 25th ult Mr A Whitehorn who appeared on behalf of the complainants said they were mother and daughter They resided at 47 Edith Street Spital Dene whilst the defendant lived at No 25 in the same street On Thursday afternoon last Mrs Mitchell was wheeling a pram past the defendant s mother s door when a brother of the defendant jeered at her She took no notice of him but next day seeing him in the back lane she remonstrated with him about jeering at her At this time the defendant came upon the scene and rolling up his sleeves offered to fight anyone in Mitchell s house Mrs Mitchell advised him to go away and to frighten him said she would throw some water over him She put the pail underneath the tap and let the water run but before it was half full the defendant ran into the yard took hold of her by the throat and knocked her head against the wall Mr Whitehorn described the attack as a most outrageous one and asked the Bench to deal severely with the defendant The daughter of Mrs Mitchell called the defendant a coward for striking a woman whereupon the defendant struck her a violent blow on the side of the face Complainants bore out this testimony Defendant alleged that Mrs and Miss Mitchell made a practice of reminding him of the time he was in gaol and telling him he would be there again He denied assaulting either of the complainants and called his brother who gave evidence on his behalf A fine of 5s and costs was imposed in each case with the alternative of 14 days imprisonment These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/20868185439/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/20868185439/ William Townsley, labourer, arrested for stealing jewellery Name William Townsley Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on not given Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 81 William Townsley This image of Townsley seems to have been supplied by the Gateshead Constabulary to the police at North Shields An image of his accomplice Luke Swailes is available here www flickr com photos twm news 27190318155 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 29 September 1906 reports THEFT OF JEWELLERY AT NORTH SHIELDS TWO MEN COMMITTED FOR TRIAL This morning at the North Shields Police Court before Captain J Sanderson and Mr G H Stansfield Luke Swailes 60 general dealer and Wm Townsley a young man both of Gateshead were charged with stealing on the 27th of November 1905 from Welbury House Preston Park three bracelets a neck chain locket ring and brooch value 20 the property of Ethel Annie Freeth Swailes was further charged with receiving from Wm Townsley a gold expansion bracelet and watch value 6 the property of Alfred John Freeth well knowing the same to have been stolen Mr G W Chapman represented Swailes Ethel Annie Freeth said that on Sunday November 26th she left her watch and bracelet in a drawer in the bedroom together with the other articles mentioned in the charge On the afternoon of the next day she missed them and gave information to the police Elizabeth Irvin dressmaker 84 Grey Street said that in November last she was employed at the Elms Preston Park which was next door to Freeth s house On the afternoon of the 27th she saw a man prowling about in front of the sitting room window and took good notice of him On January 30th she identified him among six men at Gateshead Police Station and now identified him as the prisoner Townsley Edward Surtees Chisholm manager of the New Gateshead Inn North Street Gateshead stated that he had known the prisoner Swailes for several years He was a respectable general dealer He came to witness s house one Tuesday in November or December and offered him the watch bracelet for 2 The witness bought it for that sum which he thought was a fair price Detective Radcliffe said he was present at the Gateshead Police Station when Miss Irvin identified Townsley The prisoner said I can soon get out of that I was in hospital at the time On Friday 21st he arrested Swailes on a warrant When witness read the warrant over to him he said He Townsley must be a scoundrel This is some more he has put on to me Later he said I have only to say that Townsley is a thorough scoundrel I am as innocent as a child unborn Witness showed him the watch bracelet and told him that that was what he was charged with receiving He replied I have never seen it before In the cell he said I think the best thing in a case of this kind is to plead guilty Chisholm knew as well as I did that I got it from Townsley He asked me if it was straight and I told him he would not get it for 2 if it had been Neither of the prisoners when charged this morning had anything to say The prisoner Swailes gave evidence on his own behalf He said that he was 50 years of age and a general dealer and lived at 4 Towns Street New Gateshead About Christmas the accused Townsley came to him Previous to that he did not know the man Townsley asked him if he would buy a bracelet as he wanted the money to go to Scotland Asked where he had got it he said he found it sometime since at Jesmond on a seat He asked 2 for it and witness telling him that all the money he had upon him was 35s Townsley at once handed it over for that price At Chisholm s bar next day witness offered it for sale to him and he bought it for 2 Witness thought that would be about the value of the article and did not for one moment imagine it had been stolen From what he was however told later he has very reason to think that the bracelet had been stolen Afterwards from time to time witness advanced Townsley s mother small sums of money Eventually he stopped lending her money whereupon she made a charge against him to the Gateshead Police He was tried on that charge at Durham Assizes and acquitted When charged last Friday week with the offence now being dealt with he did deny that he bought the bracelet from Townsley He did this because he was afraid of getting Chisholm into trouble Later he admitted that he had sold it Cross examined by the Chief Constable Mr J H Huish Swailes admitted that when arrested he did not know that the bracelet was in the hands of the police The prisoner Townsley reserved his defence Both prisoners were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions Townsley who was in charge of warders was conveyed to Newcastle Gaol to await trial Swailes was admitted to bail in his own recognisances of 50 and one surety of 50 Townsley is at present undergoing a sentence of three years penal servitude for burglary at Hedgeley Heath and was brought before the magistrates on a Home Office order The Shields Daily News for 19 October 1906 reports William Townsley 22 labourer pleaded guilty to having stolen 20 worth of jewellery at Tynemouth on Nov 27 1905 the property of Miss Ethel Annie Freeth of Preston Park North Shields Luke Swailes 59 dealer pleaded not guilty to a charge of having received the jewellery well knowing it to have been stolen Mr Griffith Jones prosecuted and Mr Mundahl defended the accused Swailes The jury found Swailes guilty and he was sentenced to three months hard labour Townsley who is currently undergoing a sentence of three years penal servitude at Stafford Prison was sentenced to a similar term to run concurrently with the sentence he is now serving These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/27145451015/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/27145451015/ Luke Swailes, general dealer, arrested for receiving stolen goods Name Luke Swailes Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 23 September 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 95 Luke Swailes An image of his accomplice William Townsley is available here www flickr com photos twm news 27145451015 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 29 September 1906 reports THEFT OF JEWELLERY AT NORTH SHIELDS TWO MEN COMMITTED FOR TRIAL This morning at the North Shields Police Court before Captain J Sanderson and Mr G H Stansfield Luke Swailes 60 general dealer and Wm Townsley a young man both of Gateshead were charged with stealing on the 27th of November 1905 from Welbury House Preston Park three bracelets a neck chain locket ring and brooch value 20 the property of Ethel Annie Freeth Swailes was further charged with receiving from Wm Townsley a gold expansion bracelet and watch value 6 the property of Alfred John Freeth well knowing the same to have been stolen Mr G W Chapman represented Swailes Ethel Annie Freeth said that on Sunday November 26th she left her watch and bracelet in a drawer in the bedroom together with the other articles mentioned in the charge On the afternoon of the next day she missed them and gave information to the police Elizabeth Irvin dressmaker 84 Grey Street said that in November last she was employed at the Elms Preston Park which was next door to Freeth s house On the afternoon of the 27th she saw a man prowling about in front of the sitting room window and took good notice of him On January 30th she identified him among six men at Gateshead Police Station and now identified him as the prisoner Townsley Edward Surtees Chisholm manager of the New Gateshead Inn North Street Gateshead stated that he had known the prisoner Swailes for several years He was a respectable general dealer He came to witness s house one Tuesday in November or December and offered him the watch bracelet for 2 The witness bought it for that sum which he thought was a fair price Detective Radcliffe said he was present at the Gateshead Police Station when Miss Irvin identified Townsley The prisoner said I can soon get out of that I was in hospital at the time On Friday 21st he arrested Swailes on a warrant When witness read the warrant over to him he said He Townsley must be a scoundrel This is some more he has put on to me Later he said I have only to say that Townsley is a thorough scoundrel I am as innocent as a child unborn Witness showed him the watch bracelet and told him that that was what he was charged with receiving He replied I have never seen it before In the cell he said I think the best thing in a case of this kind is to plead guilty Chisholm knew as well as I did that I got it from Townsley He asked me if it was straight and I told him he would not get it for 2 if it had been Neither of the prisoners when charged this morning had anything to say The prisoner Swailes gave evidence on his own behalf He said that he was 50 years of age and a general dealer and lived at 4 Towns Street New Gateshead About Christmas the accused Townsley came to him Previous to that he did not know the man Townsley asked him if he would buy a bracelet as he wanted the money to go to Scotland Asked where he had got it he said he found it sometime since at Jesmond on a seat He asked 2 for it and witness telling him that all the money he had upon him was 35s Townsley at once handed it over for that price At Chisholm s bar next day witness offered it for sale to him and he bought it for 2 Witness thought that would be about the value of the article and did not for one moment imagine it had been stolen From what he was however told later he has very reason to think that the bracelet had been stolen Afterwards from time to time witness advanced Townsley s mother small sums of money Eventually he stopped lending her money whereupon she made a charge against him to the Gateshead Police He was tried on that charge at Durham Assizes and acquitted When charged last Friday week with the offence now being dealt with he did deny that he bought the bracelet from Townsley He did this because he was afraid of getting Chisholm into trouble Later he admitted that he had sold it Cross examined by the Chief Constable Mr J H Huish Swailes admitted that when arrested he did not know that the bracelet was in the hands of the police The prisoner Townsley reserved his defence Both prisoners were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions Townsley who was in charge of warders was conveyed to Newcastle Gaol to await trial Swailes was admitted to bail in his own recognisances of 50 and one surety of 50 Townsley is at present undergoing a sentence of three years penal servitude for burglary at Hedgeley Heath and was brought before the magistrates on a Home Office order The Shields Daily News for 19 October 1906 reports William Townsley 22 labourer pleaded guilty to having stolen 20 worth of jewellery at Tynemouth on Nov 27 1905 the property of Miss Ethel Annie Freeth of Preston Park North Shields Luke Swailes 59 dealer pleaded not guilty to a charge of having received the jewellery well knowing it to have been stolen Mr Griffith Jones prosecuted and Mr Mundahl defended the accused Swailes The jury found Swailes guilty and he was sentenced to three months hard labour Townsley who is currently undergoing a sentence of three years penal servitude at Stafford Prison was sentenced to a similar term to run concurrently with the sentence he is now serving These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/27190318155/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/27190318155/ Reginald Stains alias Brown, chief steward, arrested for false pretences Name Reginald Stains alias Brown Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Arrested on 4 December 1915 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 262 Reginald Stains AKA Brown The Shields Daily News for 15 December 1915 reports NORTH SHIELDS FALSE PRETENCES CASE ACCUSED COMMITTED FOR TRIAL Reginald Ashley Staines 30 chief steward of 23 Milton Terrace was brought up on remand at North Shields today charged with having obtained by false pretences on the 22nd Nov from Joseph Randell the sum of 15 and on the 23rd ult a further sum of 7 from Joseph Randell and Ed Perris and on the same date in a like manner the sum of 5 from William Manson Bews with intent to cheat and defraud Mr Frankham of Newcastle defended Joseph Randell of 40 Drummond Terrace stated that in the early part of November last defendant came to his shop and made reference to some previous groceries and wanted to open an account On the 22nd October he ordered goods to be sent on board his ship On the 22nd Nov he wanted to cash a cheque for 15 He said he had got married and wanted to go to Liverpool and witness gave him the 15 Next day he again came to the shop and asked witness to cash another cheque for 7 and he said he would send his account from Liverpool in settlement for some goods Witness cashed the cheque He presented the cheques on the 22nd and 23rd Nov and they were returned on the 24th and 25th Mr Frankham Defendant has had other dealings with you for groceries and provision Yes Mr Frankham Have you cashed other cheques for him One for 10 which was honoured Mr Frankham If he had asked for the loan of a certain sum would you have give him it No Mr Frankham He never attempted to conceal where he was going to No Mr Frankham You made no effort to get in touch with him Yes Mr Perris went to his mother s and could not get his address William Manson Bews a tailor residing in Linskill Terrace said that on the 23rd October the defendant came to his shop and ordered a frock suit a jack suit a double breasted suit and a cap He was dressed in a naval uniform and said the things had to be delivered to the Northumberland Arms On the 22nd November he again came to the shop and asked for his account He told witness he was a little short of cash Witness gave him 5 and the defendant made out a cheque for 22 12s in payment of the clothes and the money The cheque was presented at Farrow s Bank Newcastle on the 24th and returned on the 26th Witness still had all the clothes with the exception of the uniform George Graham Campbell of Farrow s Bank said that no the 24th November the cheque produced for 15 was presented and returned marked N S On that date the defendant only had 3 19s 6d in the bank On the 25th November cheques for 7 and 22 12s were presented but the defendant only had a balance of 1 19s 6d then Detective Sergeant Radcliffe stated that from certain information received he went to Brighton on the 3rd inst and took the defendant into custody from the Brighton police He was brought to North Shields and when questioned replied The only thing I can say is the cheque must not have been met When charged later he made no reply The defendant pleaded not guilty Mr Frankham said the defendant had not the slightest intent to rob anybody of money He had a banking account and being newly married and unwell had gone away and given these cheques He had about 16 on board the ship and the officers were owing him about 30 The defendant gave a cheque for 1 on the 13th November as a donation to the YMCA He had not tried to cover up any tracks and the officers on board HMS Satellite knew where he was The defendant in giving evidence on his own behalf said he was chief steward on HM Yacht Medusa II The ship came into port on the 19th November and he had leave granted because he had been ill and he was going to be married After the marriage he went to Liverpool and was there two days and he then went to London and Brighton He sent his medical certificate to HMS Satellite When he got the money from Mr Randell and Mr Bews he understood he had sufficient money in the bank to meet the cheques Money was owing to him on board the ship but he could not say how much He had no intention of defrauding the people The defendant was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions On 6 January 1916 at Northumberland Quarter Sessions Reginald Staines was acquitted on a charge of obtaining money by false pretences from tradesmen at North Shields These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22748398346/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22748398346/ Mary A. Marr, arrested for stealing a sailor's bag Name Mary A Marr Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 6 June 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 41 Mary A Marr For an image of her daughter Alice Maud Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 16935100722 in album 72157 For an image of her son Charles Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 16567211557 in album 72157 For an image of her daughter Mary Ellen Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 17084333602 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 6 June 1906 reports THEFT OF A SAILOR S BAG AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields Police Court today Charles Marr Mary Ann Marr Mary Ellen Marr and Chas Marr were charged with being concerned together in stealing a sailor s bag of clothing etc valued at 2 the property of John Partis Gibson a seaman Supt Jamieson of the BTP prosecuted The prosecutor said that on the 7th May he joined the s s Camelia which was then lying at the Commissioners Staithes He was proceeding to the docks with his bag and when passing the North Shields Railway Station the defendant Chas Marr came up to him and offered to carry his bag for 1d He said he would give him 3d if he carried it to the docks and he agreed to do so He gave him the bag and told him he was going to make a purchase On reaching his vessel he failed to see the boy and gave information to the police He went to sea the same day and had just returned Two pawnbrokers assistants spoke to receiving a portion of the stolen clothing from two of the female defendants Sub Inspector Leitch said that on the 8th May from information received he made enquiries and proceeded to the North Shields Railway Station where he found the boy Marr and questioned him He told witness he took the bag home being unable to find the man who had engaged him at the dock He went to the house occupied by the defendants and spoke to Mrs Marr with regard to the bag She told him it was in the cupboard He took possession of it and found that it contained only a small portion of the stolen clothing He mentioned this circumstance to her and she said it was just the same as it was when it was brought in the previous day and that it had not been touched He searched the house and found a portion of the property and he recovered the remainder from the pawnbrokers He added that the boy told the truth at once and had given him every assistance in recovering the property while the mother had given him a great deal of trouble Formally charged the mother Mary Ann Marr said it would not have happened had it not been for need Charles who made his 13th appearance was given the option of a fine he having assisted the police and he was mulcted in 1s without costs Marry Ann Marr whom the magistrates considered was the chief instigator in the theft was committed to prison for 14 days while Mary Ellen Marr was sentenced to 7 days imprisonment Because of her youth Alice Marr was discharged The Shields Daily News for 24 January 1907 reports THEFT OF DOOR MATS MOTHER AND DAUGHTERS SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today Mary Ellen Marr 21 Alice Maud Marr 17 sisters and Mary Ann Marr 44 their mother were charged with having stolen an indiarubber door mat valued at 1 4s the property of Joseph Ostens from the doorway of his house 34 Grosvenor Place on the 17th inst or with having received the same well knowing it to have been stolen They were further charged with having stolen a similar mat valued at 1 3s from the doorway of No 32 Grosvenor Place on the 17th inst the property of John R Sutherland There was a third charge against Mary Ellen and Alice Maud of having stolen on the 21st ult from the porch of Percy Park House Grand Parade Tynemouth an indiarubber mat valued at 1 10s the property of Mr A O Carr JP In the first case Detective Sergeant Hall said that on the 18th inst he arrested the accused at their residence in Church Way He found the mat produced cut to pieces in the kitchen Afterwards it was identified by the prosecutor as his property In the other cases evidence was given to the effect that the two other mats had been similarly treated and that one of them had been disposed of at a marine store dealer s for 3s 6d Previous convictions against the accused were put in by the Chief Constable Mr J H Huish and the magistrates committed the mother to prison for 14 days on each of the two charges preferred against her and sent the daughters to gaol for 14 days on each of the three charges preferred against them These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/27451885680/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/27451885680/ Alice Maud Marr, arrested for stealing door mats Name Alice Maud Marr Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 19 January 1907 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 43 Alice Maud Marr For an image of her mother Mary Ann Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 27451885680 in album 72157 For an image of her sister Mary Ellen Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 17084333602 in album 72157 For an image of her brother Charles Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 16567211557 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 24 January 1907 reports THEFT OF DOOR MATS MOTHER AND DAUGHTERS SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today Mary Ellen Marr 21 Alice Maud Marr 17 sisters and Mary Ann Marr 44 their mother were charged with having stolen an indiarubber door mat valued at 1 4s the property of Joseph Ostens from the doorway of his house 34 Grosvenor Place on the 17th inst or with having received the same well knowing it to have been stolen They were further charged with having stolen a similar mat valued at 1 3s from the doorway of No 32 Grosvenor Place on the 17th inst the property of John R Sutherland There was a third charge against Mary Ellen and Alice Maud of having stolen on the 21st ult from the porch of Percy Park House Grand Parade Tynemouth an indiarubber mat valued at 1 10s the property of Mr A O Carr JP In the first case Detective Sergeant Hall said that on the 18th inst he arrested the accused at their residence in Church Way He found the mat produced cut to pieces in the kitchen Afterwards it was identified by the prosecutor as his property In the other cases evidence was given to the effect that the two other mats had been similarly treated and that one of them had been disposed of at a marine store dealer s for 3s 6d Previous convictions against the accused were put in by the Chief Constable Mr J H Huish and the magistrates committed the mother to prison for 14 days on each of the two charges preferred against her and sent the daughters to gaol for 14 days on each of the three charges preferred against them Alice Marr was also involved in an earlier case The Shields Daily News for 6 June 1906 reports THEFT OF A SAILOR S BAG AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields Police Court today Charles Marr Mary Ann Marr Mary Ellen Marr and Chas Marr were charged with being concerned together in stealing a sailor s bag of clothing etc valued at 2 the property of John Partis Gibson a seaman Supt Jamieson of the BTP prosecuted The prosecutor said that on the 7th May he joined the s s Camelia which was then lying at the Commissioners Staithes He was proceeding to the docks with his bag and when passing the North Shields Railway Station the defendant Chas Marr came up to him and offered to carry his bag for 1d He said he would give him 3d if he carried it to the docks and he agreed to do so He gave him the bag and told him he was going to make a purchase On reaching his vessel he failed to see the boy and gave information to the police He went to sea the same day and had just returned Two pawnbrokers assistants spoke to receiving a portion of the stolen clothing from two of the female defendants Sub Inspector Leitch said that on the 8th May from information received he made enquiries and proceeded to the North Shields Railway Station where he found the boy Marr and questioned him He told witness he took the bag home being unable to find the man who had engaged him at the dock He went to the house occupied by the defendants and spoke to Mrs Marr with regard to the bag She told him it was in the cupboard He took possession of it and found that it contained only a small portion of the stolen clothing He mentioned this circumstance to her and she said it was just the same as it was when it was brought in the previous day and that it had not been touched He searched the house and found a portion of the property and he recovered the remainder from the pawnbrokers He added that the boy told the truth at once and had given him every assistance in recovering the property while the mother had given him a great deal of trouble Formally charged the mother Mary Ann Marr said it would not have happened had it not been for need Charles who made his 13th appearance was given the option of a fine he having assisted the police and he was mulcted in 1s without costs Marry Ann Marr whom the magistrates considered was the chief instigator in the theft was committed to prison for 14 days while Mary Ellen Marr was sentenced to 7 days imprisonment Because of her youth Alice Marr was discharged These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16935100722/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16935100722/ William Morrissey alias Smith, arrested for sleeping rough Name William Morrissey alias Smith Arrested for Sleeping Out Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 11 July 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 53 William Morrisey AKA Smith The Shields Daily Gazette for 11 July 1904 reported At North Shields Charles Winlow 53 tramp no fixed abode was charge with lodging in a hay stack in Mariners Lane without having visible means of subsistence and was sent to prison for seven days William Wadham Tyne Dock William Smith or Morrison shoeblack and William Patton no fixed abode were charged with lodging in a hay pike at Kenners Dene Farm Wadham and Smith were each committed for seven days and Patton was committed for 14 days For a mugshot of William Wadham see www flickr com photos twm news 15870103783 in set 7215762 The Shields Daily Gazette for 7 June 1904 reports Two youths named Joseph Leach 52 Wilson Street and William Morrisey no fixed abode were found by PC Twiddy were found sleeping in a railway carriage on the N E R siding in Garden Lane at 3 15 this morning Relating the facts to the South Shields magistrates the officer said that when he roused Leach that defendant set himself in a fighting attitude while the other sat up on the seat lit a cigarette and refused to leave The magistrates fined them 5s and costs each Contemporary attitudes to rough sleeping can be seen in a report in the Shields Daily Gazette on 5 October 1903 At Jarrow today John Smith Wm Cooper James Bell young men who said they came to the town in search of work were charged with sleeping in Palmers Works last night PC Lowery gave evidence and Supt Fleming said that the county was swarming with fellows like defendants who should be made to seek shelter in the Workhouses Defendants were sent to prison for 7 days The Shields Daily Gazette of 8 October 1903 contains an article entitled Lazy Loafers There are some people who will neither work nor want They are the typical loafers we can see in the streets any day Apparently we have a fairly good stock of them at North Shields It is not because of depression of trade either The other morning no fewer than half a dozen of such individuals were place in the dock on a charge of sleeping out The officer had found them all huddled together in an empty room during the night and they could not give a satisfactory account of themselves When questioned by the magistrates the police officers stated that all the defendants were lazy loafers who had never worked for a considerable time They did nothing but lounge about the streets during the day and then obtained shelter in some empty room or outhouse at night The magistrates marked their sense of the offence by sending them all to prison for a month each each with hard labour A month of hard work will probably do them a vast of good and will enable them to shake off that habitual tired feeling Morrisey was convicted on numerous other occasions The Shields Daily Gazette of 5 November 1902 reported At South Shields today a youth named William Morrisey was charged with stealing on the 4th inst a jacket of the value of 2s 3d the property of James Davison He was fined 10s and costs The Shields Daily Gazette for 2 January 1903 reported Before the Mayor Counc James Grant and other magistrates at So Shields on Wednesday William Morrisey 16 and Arthur Cairns 18 were charged with stealing on Dec 29th a barometer valued at 25s on the way to the Police Station Morrisey remarked A couple of months would just about put me right The Bench fined Morrisey who had previously convicted for larceny 10s and costs and Cairns 5s and costs The Shields Daily News for 10 July 1905 reported At South Shields Police Court today William Morrisey 20 no fixed abode and David McNess 19 Anderson s Lane were charged with breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary McCalvery on the 8th inst and stealing therein two desks value 10s Prosecutrix said she kept a green grocer s shop in Tyne Street and resided upon the premises At half past twelve on the afternoon of the 8th inst she locked up her house and shop leaving two desks which contained some valuables on a desk bed in the kitchen When she returned to her house at twenty past ten at night she found that someone had been in the house and that the desks had been removed from the desk bed on to the floor near the door A witness deposed to seeing the prisoners loitering near the prosecutrix s shop She afterwards saw Morrisey open the house door with a key and go in She then informed the police PC Ogg said from what he was told he visited the prosecutrix s house and on going inside he found Morrisey in the kitchen He took him into custody He afterwards apprehended McNess The prisoner had nothing to say This was Morrisey s 18th offence and he was committed to prison for 3 months this being McNess s 1st offence he was bound over for three months These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16296238087/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16296238087/ Mary Ellen Marr Name Mary E Marr Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 28 August 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 37 Mary Marr For an image of her mother Mary Ann Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 27451885680 in album 72157 For an image of her sister Alice Maud Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 16935100722 in album 72157 For an image of her brother Charles Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 16567211557 in album 72157 Mary Marr s arrest in 1905 was not her only brush with the police The Shields Daily News for 6 June 1906 reports THEFT OF A SAILOR S BAG AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields Police Court today Charles Marr Mary Ann Marr Mary Ellen Marr and Chas Marr were charged with being concerned together in stealing a sailor s bag of clothing etc valued at 2 the property of John Partis Gibson a seaman Supt Jamieson of the BTP prosecuted The prosecutor said that on the 7th May he joined the s s Camelia which was then lying at the Commissioners Staithes He was proceeding to the docks with his bag and when passing the North Shields Railway Station the defendant Chas Marr came up to him and offered to carry his bag for 1d He said he would give him 3d if he carried it to the docks and he agreed to do so He gave him the bag and told him he was going to make a purchase On reaching his vessel he failed to see the boy and gave information to the police He went to sea the same day and had just returned Two pawnbrokers assistants spoke to receiving a portion of the stolen clothing from two of the female defendants Sub Inspector Leitch said that on the 8th May from information received he made enquiries and proceeded to the North Shields Railway Station where he found the boy Marr and questioned him He told witness he took the bag home being unable to find the man who had engaged him at the dock He went to the house occupied by the defendants and spoke to Mrs Marr with regard to the bag She told him it was in the cupboard He took possession of it and found that it contained only a small portion of the stolen clothing He mentioned this circumstance to her and she said it was just the same as it was when it was brought in the previous day and that it had not been touched He searched the house and found a portion of the property and he recovered the remainder from the pawnbrokers He added that the boy told the truth at once and had given him every assistance in recovering the property while the mother had given him a great deal of trouble Formally charged the mother Mary Ann Marr said it would not have happened had it not been for need Charles who made his 13th appearance was given the option of a fine he having assisted the police and he was mulcted in 1s without costs Marry Ann Marr whom the magistrates considered was the chief instigator in the theft was committed to prison for 14 days while Mary Ellen Marr was sentenced to 7 days imprisonment Because of her youth Alice Marr was discharged The Shields Daily News for 24 January 1907 reports THEFT OF DOOR MATS MOTHER AND DAUGHTERS SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today Mary Ellen Marr 21 Alice Maud Marr 17 sisters and Mary Ann Marr 44 their mother were charged with having stolen an indiarubber door mat valued at 1 4s the property of Joseph Ostens from the doorway of his house 34 Grosvenor Place on the 17th inst or with having received the same well knowing it to have been stolen They were further charged with having stolen a similar mat valued at 1 3s from the doorway of No 32 Grosvenor Place on the 17th inst the property of John R Sutherland There was a third charge against Mary Ellen and Alice Maud of having stolen on the 21st ult from the porch of Percy Park House Grand Parade Tynemouth an indiarubber mat valued at 1 10s the property of Mr A O Carr JP In the first case Detective Sergeant Hall said that on the 18th inst he arrested the accused at their residence in Church Way He found the mat produced cut to pieces in the kitchen Afterwards it was identified by the prosecutor as his property In the other cases evidence was given to the effect that the two other mats had been similarly treated and that one of them had been disposed of at a marine store dealer s for 3s 6d Previous convictions against the accused were put in by the Chief Constable Mr J H Huish and the magistrates committed the mother to prison for 14 days on each of the two charges preferred against her and sent the daughters to gaol for 14 days on each of the three charges preferred against them These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/17084333602/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/17084333602/ James Curry, arrested for stealing brass Name James Currey Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 27 July 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 75 James Currey Images are also available of his accomplices John Curry www flickr com photos twm news 16091228264 in album 72157 and Robert Smith www flickr com photos twm news 19144732584 in dateposted The Shields Daily News for 28 July 1905 reports THEFT FROM SMITH S DOCK THREE NORTH SHIELDS MEN SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today Robert Smith 48 fireman 9 Middle Street Milburn Place John Curry 39 25 Front Street and James Curry 35 3 West Street Milburn Place marine store dealers were charged on remand with having stolen from Messrs Smith s Pontoon Dock on the 25th inst a quantity of brass valued at 4 17s 1d John Craigie foreman fitter with the prosecutors said that on the morning of the 26th inst he went into the engine room of the pontoon and missed a quantity of brass In the afternoon of the same day he accompanied an officer to No 25 Front Street Milburn Place and there identified a portion of the stolen metal James C Smith store keeper with Messrs Smith s Dock Coy Ltd said that on the morning of the 26th inst He missed a quantity of brass and afterwards went to the Central Police Station He was there shown a quantity of brass which he identified as the property of Messrs Smith The total weight of the metal was 116 lbs and the value was 4 17s 1d Joseph Garrick a rigger and stevedore said that on the 25th inst he saw Smith and James Curry go into the Aberllelyn Arms in Front Street Milburn Place At a late hour on the same night he saw Smith go over the wall of Messrs Smith s premises enter the engine room and afterwards leave with a bag of metal He gave information to the police PC Cuerton said that at 11 40pm on the 25th inst he saw John Curry go into his house and at midnight he saw his brother leave the house and walk in the direction of his own Detective Sergt Scougal said that at noon on the 26th inst he went to the house of John Curry with a search warrant and found underneath the bed a quantity of brass which was identified as the property of Messrs Smith by the witness Craigie He then proceeded to No 9 Middle Street where he saw Smith He told him he was going to take him to the Bull Ring Police Station whereupon his wife said What s the matter Bob Accused replied There has been some brass stolen from Smith s Witness charged him with having stolen the brass and he replied I know nothing about it At five o clock the same afternoon he met the two Currys in the Borough Road and told them he was going to take them to the Bull Ring Police Station They both replied It is only a bit of spite because we would not do the same as him The following morning he charged the three of the prisoners with the theft Smith replied I have nothing to say John Curry replied We got the best part of the brass from the saw mills We only got two small pieces from Smith and gave him a couple of bob for them James in answer to the charge said they got most of the metal from the saw mills Formally charged the whole of the prisoners pleaded guilty Mr G R Duncan who represented the accused said that Smith who could produce discharges covering a period of twenty years showing an excellent character had been employed for some time as a fireman by the prosecuting firm Unfortunately having got some drink he yielded to the temptation while working on the night shift and in consequence had lost his situation Both he and his wife were most distressed about it The two Currys were licensed marine store dealers bearing good characters The Chairman said the case was too serious to be dealt with under the First Offenders Act and the amount involved was too large to permit of a fine being imposed The prisoners would each be committed for a month This may not have been Curry s last brush with the courts The Shields Daily News for 15 November 1907 reports WIFE ASSAULT James Curry a young man was summoned for having assaulted his wife on the 9th inst Complainant said that on the date in question her husband came home drunk and without receiving provocation badly used her blackening one of her eyes He was frequently drunk and whenever he was in that condition he ill treated her using pokers chairs and anything else he could lay his hands on She had him before the magistrates nine years ago and she had then only been seven months married Defendant promised to behave himself better in future The Chairman Coun Addison severely repromanded the dfendant in imposing a fine of 10s and costs or 14 days These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16091228094/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16091228094/ John T. Keating, arrested for stealing sash weights Name John T Keating Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 10th September 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 57 John T Keating For an image of his accomplice Charles Johnson see www flickr com photos twm news 6628453871 in album 721576 The Shields Daily News for 10 September 1904 reports NORTH SHIELDS YOUTHS SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today two youths named respectively John T Keating and Charles Johnson were each committed to prison for stealing four sash weights value 5s the property of Messrs S G Ward and Son from a house in Stewart s Bank on the 6th This wasn t to be Keating s last offence The Shields Daily News 19 September 1905 reports THEFT OF BEER AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields Police Court today John Legg Thomas Codling and John T Keating young men were charged with stealing from the warehouse of Messrs Gray and Son wharfingers Liddell Street 10 gallons of beer valued at 14s on the 11th inst Joseph Gunn manager for the prosecutors said that in consequence of something that had previously happened he concealed himself in the warehouse on the 11th inst At 8 50pm Legg and Keating entered the yard and made their way to the beer shed He came out of hiding and caught the two men named and sent for the police PC Graham said he arrested the accused and searched them In the possession of Legg he found three spiles which he said he used to stop the beer after he tapped the barrel Witness afterwards charged all three Legg replied I did not steal all that Codling said I never stole that much and Keating answered The same for me On being formally charged the accused pleaded guilty and they were each committed to prison for one month For an image of his accomplice John Legg see www flickr com photos twm news 24138890482 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 18 November 1907 reports At North Shields Police Court today before Coun Sanderson and Mr Jas Walton George Edward Whiting 20 Robert Richardson 18 John Thomas Keating 22 and Jos Walker 19 were charged with breaking and entering between 6pm on Nov 15th and 9am on Nov 16th marine store at Black Cock Quay Clive Street and stewaling therefrom a cash box containing 4s 6d in money a pair of opera glasses value 10s and a number of foreign coins valued 1s the property of Messrs Morris and Coy Solomon Morris who trades under the style of Morris and Co said he left the premises secure at six pm last Friday and next morning he found that they had been broken into and the money and goods mentioned in the charge were missing Witness found that an entrance had been effected by forcing away a board which had been nailed across a window Inspector Proud said he apprehended Whiting at a house in Union Stairs He then went to South Shields and received Richardson into custody from the police He had been arrested while offering the opera glasses in pledge Witness arrested Keating and Walker in an attic in Liddell Street He jointly charged the four men with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a cash box containing 4s 6d a pair of opera glasses and a number of foreign coins Whiting replied I have nothing to say Richardson said I can say there was only 2s 6d in the cash box and we shared it out receiving 8d each Keating s answer was I have nothing to say it s true and Walker replied I have nothing to say that s right Witness recovered the opera glasses and coins from the South Shields police and found the cash box in Linskill Bank leading from Clive Street to the Ropery Banks The accused who had nothing further to say were committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions The Shields Daily News for 3 January 1908 reports from Northumberland Quarter Sessions SHOPBREAKING AT TYNEMOUTH Joseph Walker 19 labourer John Thomas Keating 22 labourer Robert Richardson 18 miner and George Edward Whiting 20 cartman all pleaded guilty to a charge of breaking and entering the shop of Messrs Morris and C and stealing a cash box a pair of opera glasses a number of foreign coins and the sum of 4s 6d in money Inspector Proud in answer to the Bench said all the lads had been previously convicted The Chairman said they wished to give two of the prisoners a chance to reform Therefore they sentenced Walker to twelve months imprisonment with hard labour under the Borstal system and Richardson was discharged on entering into his own recognisances of 5 to be of good behaviour for twelve months Keating whose record was commented on by the Bench as being a very bad one and who was described by the Chairman as the leader of the gang was sentenced to six months imprisonment with hard labour and Whiting to three months with hard labour For an image of Keating s accomplice Robert Richardson see www flickr com photos twm news 18447897895 in album 72157 These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22984005345/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22984005345/ Robert Richardson, miner, arrested for breaking and entering a marine store Name Robert Richardson Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 18 November 1907 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 117 Robert Richardson For an image of his accomplice John Thomas Keating see www flickr com photos twm news 22984005345 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 18 November 1907 reports At North Shields Police Court today before Coun Sanderson and Mr Jas Walton George Edward Whiting 20 Robert Richardson 18 John Thomas Keating 22 and Jos Walker 19 were charged with breaking and entering between 6pm on Nov 15th and 9am on Nov 16th marine store at Black Cock Quay Clive Street and stealing therefrom a cash box containing 4s 6d in money a pair of opera glasses value 10s and a number of foreign coins valued 1s the property of Messrs Morris and Coy Solomon Morris who trades under the style of Morris and Co said he left the premises secure at six pm last Friday and next morning he found that they had been broken into and the money and goods mentioned in the charge were missing Witness found that an entrance had been effected by forcing away a board which had been nailed across a window Inspector Proud said he apprehended Whiting at a house in Union Stairs He then went to South Shields and received Richardson into custody from the police He had been arrested while offering the opera glasses in pledge Witness arrested Keating and Walker in an attic in Liddell Street He jointly charged the four men with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a cash box containing 4s 6d a pair of opera glasses and a number of foreign coins Whiting replied I have nothing to say Richardson said I can say there was only 2s 6d in the cash box and we shared it out receiving 8d each Keating s answer was I have nothing to say it s true and Walker replied I have nothing to say that s right Witness recovered the opera glasses and coins from the South Shields police and found the cash box in Linskill Bank leading from Clive Street to the Ropery Banks The accused who had nothing further to say were committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions The Shields Daily News for 3 January 1908 reports from Northumberland Quarter Sessions SHOPBREAKING AT TYNEMOUTH Joseph Walker 19 labourer John Thomas Keating 22 labourer Robert Richardson 18 miner and George Edward Whiting 20 cartman all pleaded guilty to a charge of breaking and entering the shop of Messrs Morris and C and stealing a cash box a pair of opera glasses a number of foreign coins and the sum of 4s 6d in money Inspector Proud in answer to the Bench said all the lads had been previously convicted The Chairman said they wished to give two of the prisoners a chance to reform Therefore they sentenced Walker to twelve months imprisonment with hard labour under the Borstal system and Richardson was discharged on entering into his own recognisances of 5 to be of good behaviour for twelve months Keating whose record was commented on by the Bench as being a very bad one and who was described by the Chairman as the leader of the gang was sentenced to six months imprisonment with hard labour and Whiting to three months with hard labour This wasn t Robert Richardson s first offence The Shields Daily News for 28 February 1907 reports THEFT OF IRON AT NORTH SHIELDS YOUTHS SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today John Legg 19 Skipsey s Quay Robert Richardson 17 and John Richardson 14 Union Stairs Liddell Street were charged with having stolen a quantity of iron from the Shields Engineering Company s Works Bell Street on the 27th inst PC Dixon said that at 9 50 last night he was on duty in Liddell Street near the Engineering Works when he heard a noise on the shore On going there he found a bag containing iron on the bottom of some steps and the three prisoners a few yards away He asked them what they were doing there and they said they were looking for wood While they were talking Legg went away and witness followed but was unable to find him and the iron had also disappeared He afterwards saw the three prisoners in Richardson s home and arrested them He charged them with the theft and they replied that the iron was there when they went on the shore An assistant manager of the Shields Engineering Coy valued the iron produced at 2s The two eldest prisoners pleaded guilty but John Richardson denied the charge Legg who had previously been imprisoned for larceny was sent to gaol for a month with hard labour Robert Richardson was committed for seven days in the second division and John Richardson was discharged For an image of Richardson s accomplice John Legg see www flickr com photos twm news 24138890482 in album 72157 These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18447897895/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18447897895/ Graham Wallas (right), K.B. Smellie (left), 1925 Picture given by Anne Bohm Extracts from Portraits from the Past Graham Wallas 1858 1932 by W A Robson from LSE Magazine May 1971 No41 p 5 The son of an Anglican clergyman he went to Shrewsbury and then to Corpus Christi College Oxford where he read classics His first post was as a schoolmaster at Highgate School but he left after a few years on a question of religious conformity He then became an extension lecturer in London University in 1890 He joined the Fabian Society in its early days and wrote one of the original Fabian Essays As a friend and colleague of the Webbs and Bernard Shaw he played a leading part in the creation and development of LSE from the day of its conception in August 1894 at the farm near Godalming where the four were staying until the end of his active life He was a lecturer at the School from 1895 and later became its first Professor of Political Science Wallas was much greater as teacher than as a writer As H G Wells remarked in his Autobiography the London School of Economics will testify how much the personal Graham Wallas outdid the published Graham Wallas there is scarcely any considerable figure among the younger generation of publicists who does not owe something to his slow fussy mannered penetrating and inspiring counsels Of his own debt Wells wrote I cannot measure justly the influence of the disinterested life he led on my own It was I think very considerable Many of us who were his students and friends feel a similar debt No small part of Wallas influence was due to his lovable personality and the spirit of benevolence and altruism which shone through him at all times Extracts from Professor K B S Smellie by C M R in The LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 21 Professor K B S Smellie Professor Emeritus of Political Science died in London on 30 November 1987 Only three days earlier a notice had appeared in The Times expressing his appreciation for the cards and flowers sent to him for his ninetieth birthday and his regret that because he was in hospital he could not celebrate with his friends in the normal champagne manner For K B as he was affectionately known such celebrations to mark the passing years had over the last decades become very much part of the currency of life This was not only because he rejoiced in the birthdays and anniversaries themselves but because they gave the opportunity for family and friends to come together at his home in Wimbledon to be generously entertained drawn into stimulating conversation on whatever intellectual problem was currently in the forefront of his mind and delighted by the humour felicity and incisiveness with which he would reply to the toast for the occasion More often than not the toast would be proposed by a former student of his who subsequently became a colleague and a friend For K B the three categories were largely indistinguishable and the resulting loyalties and affections were two way and lasting Kingsley Bryce Speakman Smellie was born in London on 22 November 1897 of Scottish parents who were on the stage He was educated first at a Dame School in Hammersmith and then at Latymer Upper School After the First World War he went up to St John s College Cambridge on a scholarship and obtained a First in both parts of the History Tripos In 1925 he went to Harvard Law School for a year on a Laura Spelman Rockefeller studentship and acquired the abiding fascination with the institutions of the American democracy which he always retained That year apart Smellie s whole academic career was spent on the staff of the Government Department of the School He had become a public administration assistant to Graham Wallas the first Professor of Political Science in 1921 a Lecturer in Public Administration in 1929 and a reader in Political Science in 1939 and was appointed to a personal chair in Political Science in January 1949 This he held until he reached retirement age in 1965 when he became Emeritus Twelve years later the School happily made him an Honorary Fellow He published nine books between 1928 and 1962 but it was orally perhaps more than in his writings that Smellie excelled and exercised a profound influence on generations of students The style was one of scepticism paradox aphorism of delight in ideas and intellectual provocation of much knowledge combined with an element of self depreciation and of infectious enthusiasm and wit Few who had the experience of lectures by or tutorials with K B thumbs tucked into his characteristic fawn waistcoat surmounted by an elegant French bow tie eyes twinkling and intellectual argument flowing will forget those happy experiences or what they learnt and derived from them In the sphere of public administration Smellie drew fruitfully on the practical knowledge he gained during the Second World War when he served first in the BBC s Propaganda Research Unit July to December 1940 and then as a temporary administrative civil servant from December 1940 to April 1942 in the Ministry of Home Security bomb recording work and then till January 1945 in the Board of Trade clothes rationing Before and after his temporary service Smellie was among those who lectured in Cambridge where the School was evacuated There were two other profound influences in K B s life The first was his marriage in 1931 to Stephanie Narlian one of his former students This was a happy and successful partnership in which in their qualities their activities and interests they complemented each other superbly The other influence was notable for what it did not do K B served as a Private in the London Scottish in France in the First World War and in April 1917 an exploding shell necessitated the amputation of his left leg below the knee and of his right foot For all the seventy years that followed he had two wooden prostheses But never once did he allow this to interfere with a full life which included playing table tennis driving a car in a manner which became somewhat notorious and a propensity for many years to consider attendance at West End cinemas to see the latest films as an extension of the facilities of the School IMAGELIBRARY 269 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983645400/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983645400/ George Walker, soldier, arrested for cashing a forged cheque Name George Walker Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 15 March 1916 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 264 George Walker The Shields Daily News for 20 March 1916 reports FORGING CHEQUES YOUNG SOLDIERS CHARGED AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields today Harold Weston Cummings 17 a soldier of 33 Hanover Gardens Kensington Oval London SE was brought up on remand charged with having feloniously forged a bank cheque for the sum of 4 15s on or about Feb 25th Geo Ernest Walker 17 a soldier of Freer Street Walsall was charged with cashing the cheque on the 25th Feb They were further charged with similar offences on the 25th Feb Mr F Lambert defended both defendants James Hamilton Johns Second Lieutenant in the South Staffordshire Regiment said Cummings was attached to the same regiment at Earsdon The cheque produced signed J H Johns was not out of his book and it was not his signature Witness never asked the defendants to sign cheques on his behalf Walker was also billeted at Earsdon James N Wilson cashier at Lloyd s Bank Howard Street North Shields said that between 10 and 12 30 on the 25th Feb Walker came to the bank and asked to cash the cheque produced Witness asked where he came from and he said Shiremoor and he cashed it The cheque was sent in the usual way and it was returned as the signature had been forged The cheque was from a quartermaster s book which had been lost or stolen at Plymouth Detective Sergeant Hall said that on the 11th inst he went to Earsdon and arrested Cummings and when cautioned he replied I have nothing to say On the way to North Shields he said I did not attempt to alter the handwriting in any way I have had the cheque book about a year and have never attempted to use it Later witness saw Walker in the custody of the Newcastle police and when cautioned he replied I have nothing to say Mr Lambert stated that the other charge was of a precisely similar character and he did not think it necessary to go into it There could not be any doubt that the charges were serious ones but he suggested that having regard to all the circumstances it could be settled to the satisfaction of the police and the bankers The defendants were both 17 years of age and young as they were they had already served in the army for four years Walker s father had been 26 years in the army and was now in France The police might be prepared to allow the more serious charge to be reduced to one of false pretences and the money would be refunded by the officers of the regiment Chief Constable said the defendants had cashed three more cheques at Whitley and attempted to cash one at Newcastle The people on these cases had refused to prosecute Capt Anderson gave the defendants good characters Chief Constable Huish said he had no objection to the cases being reduced The second case was not proceeded with and Cummings was charged with having received the money by false pretences and Walker with aiding and abetting Both men pleaded guilty The Chairman said the defendants would be bound over for twelve months and they were greatly indebted to their solicitor and officers These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21758122603/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21758122603/ Robert Lightly alias Golightly Name Robert Lightly alias Golightly Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 27 May 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 29 Robert Lightly AKA Golightly For an image of Lightly s accomplice Anthony Russell see www flickr com photos twm news 19172779382 in dateposted The Shields Daily Gazette for 28 May 1904 reports TWO MINERS HAVE A NIGHT OUT FRACAS ON A NO SHIELDS FARM At North Shields Anthony Russell 27 and Robert Lightly 24 pitmen Percy Main were charged with being concerned together in stealing a duck value 10s the property of Mr Elwin on the 22nd inst Joseph Elwin said that at 4 25 am he was awakened by his father who told him that he had heard three shots fired He got up and looked out of the window and saw two men each carrying a gun on the field of the farm He went out with another lad and on getting up to men he saw that one was carrying a bundle from which he saw a hare s head protruding He asked him why he had shot the hare on his father s land They made no reply and walked away He then gave information to the police On getting back to the farm he missed a duck An officer spoke to arresting the defendants and charged them with stealing a duck Lightly replied that Russell shot the duck and took it away Russell replied that he burnt it Mr Duncan for the defence said that there was no doubt they shot the duck but it was not with a felonious intent It appeared that on the Saturday night they had taken too much drink and on the Sunday morning they got up at four o clock and took their guns into the fields Russell had seen a duck and the temptation had been too strong and he had shot it The Bench committed both defendants to prison for 14 days The prisoners were afterwards charged with threatening Joseph Elwin The prosecutor said that when he accused the two men of trespassing on the farm they both threatened to shoot him if he did not get out of their way Lightly said that he would drill rabbit holes into him Mr Duncan for the defendants denied the charges and stated that Elwin challenged the men to fight The defendants both denied the charge on oath They were both bound over in the sum of 10 in their own recognisances and sureties of 10 each or in default committed for 14 days they were also ordered to pay the costs for both sides or in default go to prison for seven days The defendant Lightly was charged with assaulting Elwin by striking him in the chest with his fist and with the muzzle end of the gun The defendants were next charged with trespassing in search of game at Chirton Hill Farm on the same date Mr Duncan submitted that the defendants had already been sufficiently punished for their offence and the summons for trespass ought to be withdrawn especially as it was taken out against the wish of Mr Elwin The Chief Constable contradicted the latter statement Mr Duncan said that Mr Elwin had stated in Court that he did not wish the case to proceed and therefore the summons could not stand The Chief Constable sad that he himself was the informant in the case and he intended to go on with it Mr Duncan took the ruling of the Court on the point and Mr Kidd decided that the Chief Constable was acting within his rights After hearing the evidence the magistrates fined defendants 10s and costs or in default 14 days imprisonment to run concurrently with the other commitments These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19140868465/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19140868465/ James Waters alias Joseph Turnbull, arrested for housebreaking Name James Waters alias Joseph Turnbull Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 25 September 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 95 James Waters AKA Joseph Turnbull The Shields Daily News for 25 September 1906 reports HOUSEBREAKING AT NORTH SHIELDS ACCUSED COMMITTED FOR TRIAL At North Shields Police Court today James Turnbull alias Waters a young man was charged with breaking and entering the dwelling house no 2 Camp Terrace and stealing a silver serviette ring a lady s silver watch a silver spoon a ring bracelet and locket the property of Eliz Jackson Richard Appleby Jackson an articled clerk and estate agent residing at no 2 Camp Terrace said that on the 29th Aug last he and the other members of the family left home and returned on the 12th Sept finding that it had been broken into and that a number of articles valued at 4 8s had been stolen On the 20th inst from what he was told he went to the police station and there identified a serviette ring a watch a spoon and other articles as the property of his mother Anna Ramsey residing in Howard Street said that while the prosecutrix was from home she kept the keys of the house On the 4th Sept she went there for the purpose of watering the plants and found everything in order She locked the house up before she left everything then being secure She returned three days later and found the house in a state of disorder Mary Isabel Davies a cook in the employ of the prosecutrix said that while her mistress was away she went to live in Bedford Street On the 6th Sept she obtained the keys from the last witness in order to do some cleaning She went next day and was unable to open the front door because the chain on the inside had been put on and she was obliged to get assistance in order to force an entrance When she went into the house everything was in a state of disorder and she immediately informed the police Michael D Hart dealer in second hand goods 120 Pilgrim Street Newcastle stated that on the 7th inst the prisoner came to his shop and offered to sell the locket bracelet and ring produced which he said belonged to his wife and upon which he wished to raise some money that he was out of employment Witness gave 5s for them Accused also offered to sell a silver serviette ring a spoon and a brooch which witness declined to buy A watchmaker and jeweller belonging to West Hartlepool said that on Sept 8th the prisoner came to his shop and offered the serviette ring photo frame and spoon for sale saying he was hard up Witness bought the articles for 4s Later in the day he returned with a lady s silver watch and offered to dispose of it for 10s It was however defective and he accordingly declined to buy it Detective Radcliffe deposed to visiting the house in Camp Terrace on the 7th inst and finding the house in a state of disorder The door leading from the front to the back of the house was fastened and he had to climb through the serving aperture in order to get to the kitchen Detective Inspector Thornton said that on the 14th inst he went to West Hartlepool Police Station where the serviette ring spoon photo frame and watch were handed to him in the presence of the accused who said they were the things he got from a house in North Shields Witness told him there was a ring a locket and bracelet missing from the same house Prisoner replied that he sold them to a second hand dealer in Pilgrim Street Newcastle On being charged this morning the prisoner made no reply Formally charged by the Clerk Col R F Kidd prisoner had still nothing to say He was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions At the Northumberland Quarter Sessions The Shields Daily News for 19th October 1906 reports PENAL SERVITUDE FOR HOUSEBREAKING AT TYNEMOUTH James Turnbull 26 pleaded guilty to having broken into the dwelling house of Elizabeth Jackson at Tynemouth and stolen several articles to the value of 4 8s He was sentenced to five years penal servitude the sentence to run concurrently with a term he is at present serving at Durham These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/24166932850/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/24166932850/ John Fatherley, arrested for stealing from a ship chandler's store Name John Fatherley Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 6 October 1903 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 23 John Fatherley For an image of one of his accomplices see www flickr com photos twm news 18050615023 in photostream The Shields Daily Gazette for 6 October 1903 reports PILFERING FROM A NO SHIELDS STORE At North Shields to day George Thompson 17 cartman Bedford Lane James W Brown 18 storeman Upper Queen Street John Fatherley 16 cartman Old Fold William Stott 15 cartman Dotwick Street and James Maine 25 cartman Queen Street were charged on remand with stealing from Mr George Otto s ship chandler s store in Borough Road between Aug 1st and Sept 28th five tins of butter a shoulder of bacon and a bottle of whisky valued 2 3s 8d George Campbell store manager for Mr Otto stated that on the 28th of last month about eleven o clock in the morning he was at the store and saw the defendant Stott coming out carrying a 2lb tin of butter Witness asked him where he had got it from and he said he received it inside He took him back to the office and he then implicated Fatherley who he said gave it to him A policeman was sent for and when he arrived Fatherley and Stott implicate Brown and Thompson The four of them were then taken into custody Brown Fatherley Thompson and Maine were all employed by Mr Otto but Stott was not The article mentioned in the charge were all his master s property and were valued at 2 3s 8d PC Hannah deposed to being called to Otto s stores on the morning in question and in company with PC Spindler took Brown Thompson Stott and Fatherley into custody Subsequently he went back to the store with Thompson who showed him where a 7lb tin of butter was concealed under one of the benches PC Spindler gave corroborative evidence and added that when his charged the defendants Thompson replied Before I got my dinner on Saturday Brown tossed the butter down the hatch to me Brown replied We all had something to do in the matter Fatherley said Brown told me if I took the big tin away he would give me the little one for myself Stott stated Fatherley told me to take the tin up the back lane Maine afterwards when charged said that he would say the same as the others Detective Sergt Scougal spoke to the arrest of Maine but he denied the charge at first He then confronted him with Brown Fatherley and Thompson Thompson said What about the tin of butter you got on Saturday Maine then admitted getting a tin of butter a few weeks before and having used it Subsequently Mrs Maine handed him a bottle of whisky which she said had been bought from Otto s store Fatherley was then charged with stealing a quantity of corn from Mr Otto s stables Defendant pleaded guilty to the charge and stated that a man named Maxwell went up to him and asked if there was any chance of getting a feed of corn He defendant replied Yes and went away with a bag to the stable and put about three quarters of a stone of corn into it and took it to Maxwell s stable and he gave him three half pence for it Maxwell would not go up to Otto s stable with him because he was afraid that Mr Peacock would be about John Henry Maxwell Howard Street was then charged with receiving the corn well knowing the same to have been stolen Fatherley having repeated his statement defendant was sworn and denied ever asking Fatherley to give him and corn He had no reason to go to Fatherley to ask for corn because he was himself a man of means and obtained his corn regularly from a merchant named Reali Several witnesses were called and spoke of the high character possessed by Mr Maxwell Mrs Fatherley was then charged with receiving the bacon and butter well knowing the same to have been stolen The police produced evidence to show that at first Mrs Fatherley denied receiving anything whatever from Otto s stores excepting some old sacks to make aprons of Later however when questioned by Detective Scougal and Chief Constable Huish upon a statement which her son had made she admitted getting the butter and bacon but destroyed it later for fear her son got into mischief through it The Bench after a consultation with the clerk Col Kidd decided to commit Thompson for 21 days Brown for six weeks Fatherley for 28 days Maine for 21 days all in the second division and bound Stott over for six months as he was under 16 years of age The charges against Mrs Fatherley and Maxwell of receiving the goods well knowing them to have been stolen were dismissed These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18050615063/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18050615063/ John T. Ingleson, soldier, arrested for breaking and entering Name John T Ingleson Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 30 March 1915 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 260 John T Ingleson The Shields Daily News for 7 April 1915 reports BREAKING AND ENTERING SOLDIERS COMMITTED FOR TRIAL AT NORTH SHIELDS Frederick Jones 19 and John Thomas Ingleson 19 soldiers stationed at Earsdon were brought up on remand at North Shields today charged with breaking and entering on the 30th March a dwelling house situated at 9 Lovaine Terrace and stealing 16 knives a cruet clock pair of scissors case of needles silver tray and two salt cellars valued at 3 7s 6d the property of the executors of the late Thomas Williamson They were also charged with breaking and entering between 10pm on the 29th ult and 7 45am on the 30th ult a confectioner s shop in Queen Alexandra Road and stealing two loaves of bread valued at 7d the property of Messrs Patterson and Reed George Anderson a cashier identified the goods as the property of the executors of the late Mr Williamson PC John Dixon stated that at 2 50am on the 30th ult he found a window broken at 9 Lovaine Terrace He lifted the sash and upon shining his lamp around the room he saw Jones behind a bookcase and the other man crouching in a corner Witness arrested defendants and on searching them at the police station found the goods mentioned in their possession Det Insp said that on the morning of the 30th from what Jones told him he examined Messrs Patterson and Reed s shop and found a large stone which exactly fitted the break in the window Afterwards witness jointly charged both men and Jones replied We did it and Ingleson said I say the same When formally charged with the first offence Jones said We took them and Ingleson said We wanted to get in there mostly to get some clothes Replying to the second charge defendants both said they wanted something to eat They were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions and the magistrates complimented PC Dixon upon his smart capture On the recommendation of Chief Constable Huish the Watch Committee have granted the merit badge to PC Dixon The Shields Daily News for 9 April 1915 reports SHOP BREAKING BY SOLDIERS AT NORTH SHIELDS Frederick Jones 19 and John Thomas Ingleson 19 privates in the Duke of Wellington s First Riding Regiment stationed at Earsdon were charged with having broken into the unoccupied house of the late Mr Thomas Williamson Lovaine House Lovaine Terrace North Shields on March 30 and with having stolen various goods valued at 3 7s 6d They were also charged with the theft of two loaves of bread from the confectionery shop of Messrs Patterson and Reed at North Shields on the same date Accused pleaded guilty An officer from the prisoners regiment said they were indifferent soldiers because they had repeatedly absented themselves without leave The officer knew nothing about the men s records and said that was a matter that was not very carefully gone into at this time The Chairman said he observed from the depositions taken at the police court that Jones said We wanted money and clothes I have soldiered for six months for a shilling I got 90 days pay stopped The officer said it was true that Jones had lost a great deal of his pay but that was for absenting himself from his regiment The balance of the account was on the other side Jones who was convicted of wilful damage at Dublin in May last was sentenced to six months imprisonment with hard labour on each charge to run concurrently Ingleson was sentenced to four months imprisonment with hard labour These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21827592319/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21827592319/ George Thompson, arrested for stealing from a ship chandler's store Name George Thompson Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 6 October 1903 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 21 George Thompson For an image of one his accomplices see www flickr com photos twm news 18050615063 in photostream The Shields Daily Gazette for 6 October 1903 reports PILFERING FROM A NO SHIELDS STORE At North Shields to day George Thompson 17 cartman Bedford Lane James W Brown 18 storeman Upper Queen Street John Fatherley 16 cartman Old Fold William Stott 15 cartman Dotwick Street and James Maine 25 cartman Queen Street were charged on remand with stealing from Mr George Otto s ship chandler s store in Borough Road between Aug 1st and Sept 28th five tins of butter a shoulder of bacon and a bottle of whisky valued 2 3s 8d George Campbell store manager for Mr Otto stated that on the 28th of last month about eleven o clock in the morning he was at the store and saw the defendant Stott coming out carrying a 2lb tin of butter Witness asked him where he had got it from and he said he received it inside He took him back to the office and he then implicated Fatherley who he said gave it to him A policeman was sent for and when he arrived Fatherley and Stott implicate Brown and Thompson The four of them were then taken into custody Brown Fatherley Thompson and Maine were all employed by Mr Otto but Stott was not The article mentioned in the charge were all his master s property and were valued at 2 3s 8d PC Hannah deposed to being called to Otto s stores on the morning in question and in company with PC Spindler took Brown Thompson Stott and Fatherley into custody Subsequently he went back to the store with Thompson who showed him where a 7lb tin of butter was concealed under one of the benches PC Spindler gave corroborative evidence and added that when his charged the defendants Thompson replied Before I got my dinner on Saturday Brown tossed the butter down the hatch to me Brown replied We all had something to do in the matter Fatherley said Brown told me if I took the big tin away he would give me the little one for myself Stott stated Fatherley told me to take the tin up the back lane Maine afterwards when charged said that he would say the same as the others Detective Sergt Scougal spoke to the arrest of Maine but he denied the charge at first He then confronted him with Brown Fatherley and Thompson Thompson said What about the tin of butter you got on Saturday Maine then admitted getting a tin of butter a few weeks before and having used it Subsequently Mrs Maine handed him a bottle of whisky which she said had been bought from Otto s store Fatherley was then charged with stealing a quantity of corn from Mr Otto s stables Defendant pleaded guilty to the charge and stated that a man named Maxwell went up to him and asked if there was any chance of getting a feed of corn He defendant replied Yes and went away with a bag to the stable and put about three quarters of a stone of corn into it and took it to Maxwell s stable and he gave him three half pence for it Maxwell would not go up to Otto s stable with him because he was afraid that Mr Peacock would be about John Henry Maxwell Howard Street was then charged with receiving the corn well knowing the same to have been stolen Fatherley having repeated his statement defendant was sworn and denied ever asking Fatherley to give him and corn He had no reason to go to Fatherley to ask for corn because he was himself a man of means and obtained his corn regularly from a merchant named Reali Several witnesses were called and spoke of the high character possessed by Mr Maxwell Mrs Fatherley was then charged with receiving the bacon and butter well knowing the same to have been stolen The police produced evidence to show that at first Mrs Fatherley denied receiving anything whatever from Otto s stores excepting some old sacks to make aprons of Later however when questioned by Detective Scougal and Chief Constable Huish upon a statement which her son had made she admitted getting the butter and bacon but destroyed it later for fear her son got into mischief through it The Bench after a consultation with the clerk Col Kidd decided to commit Thompson for 21 days Brown for six weeks Fatherley for 28 days Maine for 21 days all in the second division and bound Stott over for six months as he was under 16 years of age The charges against Mrs Fatherley and Maxwell of receiving the goods well knowing them to have been stolen were dismissed These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18050615023/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18050615023/ Margaret Harker alias Long alias Carr, arrested for stealing boots Name Margaret Harker alias Long alias Carr Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 15 February 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 39 Margaret Harker AKA Long AKA Carr For an image of her accomplice Elsie Newlands see www flickr com photos twm news 17006242912 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 15 February 1906 reports LARCENY OF BOOTS AT NORTH SHIELDS TWO WOMEN SENT TO PRISON At the North Shields Police Court this morning before Dr Peart and Mr J B Williamson Elsie Newlands 22 and Margaret Harker alias Carr 28 of no fixed abode were severally charged with stealing on the 11th ult from a shop door situate at 25 Saville Street West two pairs of boots of the value of 13s 10d the property of the Realization Boot Company The manager of the prosecutor s shop stated that on the 18th ult about 4 o clock in the afternoon he observed the two pair of blutcher boots hanging outside the door At 5 o clock the same afternoon witness missed the boots which he valued at 13s 10d The pair of boots produced by the police was one of the pairs taken from the shop door George Stewart manager for Mr C D Merkel pawnbroker Clive Street said the woman Newlands came to his master s place of business and offered a new pair of boots in pledge Observing that they had not been worn and his suspicions being aroused he questioned the woman as to where she got them She said they belonged to her friend s husband and witness told her to go and bring the friend in Newlands then left the shop and later returned with the other prisoner and a man The latter two bore out Newlands story but witness did not believe them and declining to advance anything upon the boots detained them and subsequently gave information to the police PC Radcliffe a plain clothes officer deposed to going to Stockton and receiving the first prisoner Newlands into custody On charging her with the offence she replied I only tried to pledge the boots for the other woman That morning witness proceeded to Durham and apprehended the other woman on her release from gaol there and bringing her to North Shields placed her alongside Newlands and then jointly charged them with the offence Newlands said No we are not guilty of that are we The other replying No we are not The accused had been acting together at Stockton and lived together in common lodging houses at North Shields The Chief Constable Mr John H Huish said Newlands made her first appearance before the magistrates as far as he knew but belonged to a bad school The other woman made her 41st appearance having been convicted at Stockton Middlesbrough South Shields and Newcastle for various offences Newlands was sent to prison for 14 days and Harker for one month both with hard labour Margaret Harker was also in trouble the following year The Shields Daily News for 22 April 1907 reports ROBBERY FROM THE PERSON At North Shields Police Court today before Councillor J Sanderson and Mr G H Stansfield Margaret Harker Normanby and Janet Sanderson Newcastle were charged on demand with having stolen from the person of Joseph Conaty 6d and a pot of rum on the 13th inst Prosecutor who is a shipwright living at No 2 Reed Street stated that at 11 15 pm on the date named he was in Bedford Street near to the Tiger Stairs when he was accosted by the two women who asked him to get with them They went to a room in Liddell Street and after he had given them each 1s they knocked him about went through his pockets and took 6d and a pot of rum Later he was kicked downstairs by a man and upon getting outside he saw some police officers and informed them of what had occurred PC Graham and Sergt Wilson spoke to finding one of the women crouching in a recess in the yard of a house in Liddell Street Accused pleaded not guilty The magistrates taking into consideration the fact that they had been in custody for some time committed them only for one day Margaret Harker in conjunction with Robert Jackson and Thos Bell were charged with loitering in Liddell Street supposed for the purpose of committing a felony on the 13th inst PC Graham and Sergt Wilson gave evidence in support of the charge Chief Constable Huish said he had made enquiries concerning the accused and had found that they had all been convicted for larceny Harker made her 47th appearance Thos Bell his 6th appearance and Jackson his 8th appearance The last named had been imprisoned for shop breaking and robbery with violence The charge was stoutly denied by the accused who were each committed to prison for a month with hard labour For an image of her accomplice Janet Sanderson see www flickr com photos twm news 27342884894 in album 72157 These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16822680419/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16822680419/ Charles Marr, arrested for stealing a sailor's bag Name Charles Marr Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 6 June 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 89 Charles Marr For an image of his mother Mary Ann Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 27451885680 in album 72157 For an image of his sister Alice Maud Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 16935100722 in album 72157 For an image of his sister Mary Ellen Marr see www flickr com photos twm news 17084333602 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 6 June 1906 reports THEFT OF A SAILOR S BAG AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields Police Court today Charles Marr Mary Ann Marr Mary Ellen Marr and Chas Marr were charged with being concerned together in stealing a sailor s bag of clothing etc valued at 2 the property of John Partis Gibson a seaman Supt Jamieson of the BTP prosecuted The prosecutor said that on the 7th May he joined the s s Camelia which was then lying at the Commissioners Staithes He was proceeding to the docks with his bag and when passing the North Shields Railway Station the defendant Chas Marr came up to him and offered to carry his bag for 1d He said he would give him 3d if he carried it to the docks and he agreed to do so He gave him the bag and told him he was going to make a purchase On reaching his vessel he failed to see the boy and gave information to the police He went to sea the same day and had just returned Two pawnbrokers assistants spoke to receiving a portion of the stolen clothing from two of the female defendants Sub Inspector Leitch said that on the 8th May from information received he made enquiries and proceeded to the North Shields Railway Station where he found the boy Marr and questioned him He told witness he took the bag home being unable to find the man who had engaged him at the dock He went to the house occupied by the defendants and spoke to Mrs Marr with regard to the bag She told him it was in the cupboard He took possession of it and found that it contained only a small portion of the stolen clothing He mentioned this circumstance to her and she said it was just the same as it was when it was brought in the previous day and that it had not been touched He searched the house and found a portion of the property and he recovered the remainder from the pawnbrokers He added that the boy told the truth at once and had given him every assistance in recovering the property while the mother had given him a great deal of trouble Formally charged the mother Mary Ann Marr said it would not have happened had it not been for need Charles who made his 13th appearance was given the option of a fine he having assisted the police and he was mulcted in 1s without costs Marry Ann Marr whom the magistrates considered was the chief instigator in the theft was committed to prison for 14 days while Mary Ellen Marr was sentenced to 7 days imprisonment Because of her youth Alice Marr was discharged The Shields Daily Gazette reported on an earlier case involving Marr on 1 October 1904 At North Shields Charles Marr 12 residing at 24 Camden Street was charged with stealing on the 30th Sept from a timber yard at the Edward Albert Dock a quantity of timber valued at 3s the property of Messrs Pyman and Bell It appeared from the evidence that the prisoner along with two small boys had taken a barrow from a shop door and gone to the Albert Edward Dock and stolen the wood taking it round on the barrow and selling it Mr Priestman School Board Inspector said that he had had the boy under him before and he thought he had a weak intellect he had been examined by Dr Martin but had not had his report yet The Shields Daily News for 1 September 1905 reports Charles Marr 14 24 Camden Street Alexander Stephenson 14 6 Middle Street and Joseph Stein 9 10 North Street Milburn Place were remanded until Monday morning for being found begging from foot passengers on the Grand Parade at 4 30 yesterday afternoon These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16567211557/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16567211557/ Rose Sparrow alias Burns, arrested for stealing clothes Name Rose Sparrow alias Burns Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 5 March 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 39 Rose Sparrow AKA Burns For an image of her accomplice and mother Ellen Leavy see www flickr com photos twm news 22669115693 in dateposted The Shields Daily News for 12 March 1906 reports SHOP DOOR ROBBERIES AT NORTH SHIELDS MOTHER AND DAUGHTER SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today Ellen Leavey 46 8 Barrington Lane and Rose Sparrow 26 Park Street South Shields mother and daughter were charged on remand with having on the 3rd March stolen from the shop door of No 96 Bedford Street a child s dress valued at 6s 11d or with receiving the same well knowing it to have been stolen An assistant with the prosecutrix Miss M A Hogg a draper said she missed the dress and gave information to the police Inspector Thornton said that he arrested the prisoner Sparrow in Barrington Street South Shields and charged her with the theft and she replied that she was so drunk that she knew nothing about it PC Graham said he arrested Leavey in the back lane of Sibthorpe Street she then having the dress in her possession He charged her and she made no reply They were further charged on the same date with having stolen seven blouses valued at 13s 8d from the shop door of Mr Thos Heslop draper Saville Street Prosecutor said that at 3 20 pm from what he was told he followed the prisoners down Rudyard Street back lane and found the seven blouses and two pairs of boots under the shawl of the younger prisoner The elder woman had also two pairs of boots He detained Leavey until the arrival of the police but Sparrow bolted Bridget Leavey a child of 10 and a daughter and sister of the prisoners who was with them said she saw Rosie steal the articles and give them to her mother to run way with Prisoners were also charged with having stolen four pairs of boots valued at 16s 10d from the shop door of Messrs Stead and Simpson 2 Saville Stret on the 3rd inst and further with having stolen a shawl valued at 3s from the shop door of Margaret Armstrong on the 3rd inst Similar evidence was given and upon being formally charged Leavey pleaded not guilty and Sparrow admitted the thefts and said her mother had nothing to do with them She asked to be leniently dealt with She had taken to drink in consequence of her husband having neglected her and if she was given one more chance she would keep off the drink and never enter the town again The magistrate committed them to prison for 7 days in each case one month in all The Chairman Ald Collins after giving the decision said the tradesmen were very much to blame for hanging goods outside the door If they insisted on hanging goods outside they must have someone to watch them The Chief Constable said they were indebted to Mr Heslop for the arrest of the prisoners Sadly Rose Sparrow couldn t live up to her promises to change her ways Less than two months later the Shields Daily News for 30 April 1906 reported SHOP DOOR THEFT AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields Police Court today Rose Sparrow 26 married No 5 Cross Street was charged with having stolen two pairs of slippers valued at 7s 6d the property of Julius Jacobs general dealer Duke Street on Saturday evening The prosecutor s son said the slippers were hanging outside the shop door and from what he was told he followed the accused towards the Bull Ring He asked her for the slippers she had stolen and while he was speaking to her the slippers produced dropped upon the street as did also a pair of new boots The accused was further charged with stealing a pair of boots valued at 6s 6d the property of Shiklman Michael Duke Street on Saturday last Chief Constable Huish said that in March last the accused was convicted on four charges of shoplifting and since then she had been fourteen days in Durham Gaol She was committed to prison for fourteen days on each charge Lieut Col Haswell one of the magistrates said the hanging of goods outside shop doors led to a good deal of evil doing These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16888885997/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16888885997/ Morris Ginsberg , c1930s Morris Ginsberg third from left possibly with students Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 86 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3926497812/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3926497812/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 429 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337857/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337857/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 431 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337763/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337763/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 428 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093144/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093144/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 427 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093086/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093086/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 426 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337633/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337633/ Morris Ginsberg c1930s Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure Reference IMAGELIBRARY 4 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3833724730/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3833724730/ Morris Ginsberg , c1923 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 87 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712753/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712753/ Morris Ginsberg , c1918 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 83 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712529/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712529/ Morris Ginsberg , c1930 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 85 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712659/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712659/ Morris Ginsberg , c1930 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 84 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3926497694/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3926497694/ Jane Agnes Duffy, arrested for theft Name Jane A V Duffy Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 9 December 1914 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 250 Jane A V Duffy The Shields Daily News for 9 December 1914 reports A YOUNG WOMAN IN TROUBLE Today at North Shields Jane Agnes Duffy 19 61 Westcott Road South Shields was charged with stealing a gold brooch a gold ring and a silk blouse value 1 12s 6d the property of Barbara Cunningham Trevor Terrace on the 27th inst The prosecutrix said that at 18 15 pm on the 26th ult she was in Bedford Street when the accused was brought to her and she asked if witness could give her board and lodgings She stated that she had just got work at a drapers and would pay her 15s a week for board and lodgings Witness took her home Next morning the defendant got up at 9 o clock and while witness was cleaning the step the defendant ran out by the back and witness missed the articles mentioned Detective Sweeney of Wallsend said he arrested the accused on another charge on the 28th ult and found the items mentioned in her possession Detective Sergt Hall deposed to recovering the property from the last witness and receiving the accused into custody after she had been dealt with by the magistrates at Wallsend The mother of the girl told the magistrates that her daughter had no reason to steal having a good home and having been well brought up but she was rather weak in mind and had given her some trouble The clerk enquired why the magistrates at Wallsend had bound her over for 12 months under probation Detective Sweeney said that the mother and the solicitor representing her promised to put her into a home Mrs Duffy said that Father Turner had promised to look after her and put her into a home for feeble minded at Carlisle and an arrangement was made that she would go into the Harton Workhouse in the meanwhile The girl however objected to going to the workhouse and wanted to go home The case was remanded for a day The Shields Daily News for 17 December 1914 reports SOUTH SHIELDS GIRL BOUND OVER The remanded charge against Jane Agnes Duffy 19 Westcott Terrace South Shields of stealing a gold brooch a keeper ring and a blouse valued in all at 1 12s 6d the property of Barbara Cunningham Trevor Terrace North Shields came up for hearing this morning The case has several times been adjourned in order that a place should be found for the girl in a home The Bench on one occasion expressed their opinion that they did not think she had been properly looked after at home This morning the Bench after due consideration of the case and circumstances decided to bind the girl over for twelve months in the mother s surety of 40s to be of good behaviour These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22526878131/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22526878131/ Robert Smith Name Robert Smith Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 27 July 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 75 Robert Smith Images are also available of his accomplices James Curry www flickr com photos twm news 16091228094 in album 72157 and John Curry www flickr com photos twm news 16091228264 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 28 July 1905 reports THEFT FROM SMITH S DOCK THREE NORTH SHIELDS MEN SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today Robert Smith 48 fireman 9 Middle Street Milburn Place John Curry 39 25 Front Street and James Curry 35 3 West Street Milburn Place marine store dealers were charged on remand with having stolen from Messrs Smith s Pontoon Dock on the 25th inst a quantity of brass valued at 4 17s 1d John Craigie foreman fitter with the prosecutors said that on the morning of the 26th inst he went into the engine room of the pontoon and missed a quantity of brass In the afternoon of the same day he accompanied an officer to No 25 Front Street Milburn Place and there identified a portion of the stolen metal James C Smith store keeper with Messrs Smith s Dock Coy Ltd said that on the morning of the 26th inst He missed a quantity of brass and afterwards went to the Central Police Station He was there shown a quantity of brass which he identified as the property of Messrs Smith The total weight of the metal was 116 lbs and the value was 4 17s 1d Joseph Garrick a rigger and stevedore said that on the 25th inst he saw Smith and James Curry go into the Aberllelyn Arms in Front Street Milburn Place At a late hour on the same night he saw Smith go over the wall of Messrs Smith s premises enter the engine room and afterwards leave with a bag of metal He gave information to the police PC Cuerton said that at 11 40pm on the 25th inst he saw John Curry go into his house and at midnight he saw his brother leave the house and walk in the direction of his own Detective Sergt Scougal said that at noon on the 26th inst he went to the house of John Curry with a search warrant and found underneath the bed a quantity of brass which was identified as the property of Messrs Smith by the witness Craigie He then proceeded to No 9 Middle Street where he saw Smith He told him he was going to take him to the Bull Ring Police Station whereupon his wife said What s the matter Bob Accused replied There has been some brass stolen from Smith s Witness charged him with having stolen the brass and he replied I know nothing about it At five o clock the same afternoon he met the two Currys in the Borough Road and told them he was going to take them to the Bull Ring Police Station They both replied It is only a bit of spite because we would not do the same as him The following morning he charged the three of the prisoners with the theft Smith replied I have nothing to say John Curry replied We got the best part of the brass from the saw mills We only got two small pieces from Smith and gave him a couple of bob for them James in answer to the charge said they got most of the metal from the saw mills Formally charged the whole of the prisoners pleaded guilty Mr G R Duncan who represented the accused said that Smith who could produce discharges covering a period of twenty years showing an excellent character had been employed for some time as a fireman by the prosecuting firm Unfortunately having got some drink he yielded to the temptation while working on the night shift and in consequence had lost his situation Both he and his wife were most distressed about it The two Currys were licensed marine store dealers bearing good characters The Chairman said the case was too serious to be dealt with under the First Offenders Act and the amount involved was too large to permit of a fine being imposed The prisoners would each be committed for a month These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19144732584/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19144732584/ John Curry Name John Currey Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 27 July 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 75 John Currey Images are also available of his accomplices James Curry www flickr com photos twm news 16091228094 in album 72157 and Robert Smith www flickr com photos twm news 19144732584 in dateposted The Shields Daily News for 28 July 1905 reports THEFT FROM SMITH S DOCK THREE NORTH SHIELDS MEN SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today Robert Smith 48 fireman 9 Middle Street Milburn Place John Curry 39 25 Front Street and James Curry 35 3 West Street Milburn Place marine store dealers were charged on remand with having stolen from Messrs Smith s Pontoon Dock on the 25th inst a quantity of brass valued at 4 17s 1d John Craigie foreman fitter with the prosecutors said that on the morning of the 26th inst he went into the engine room of the pontoon and missed a quantity of brass In the afternoon of the same day he accompanied an officer to No 25 Front Street Milburn Place and there identified a portion of the stolen metal James C Smith store keeper with Messrs Smith s Dock Coy Ltd said that on the morning of the 26th inst He missed a quantity of brass and afterwards went to the Central Police Station He was there shown a quantity of brass which he identified as the property of Messrs Smith The total weight of the metal was 116 lbs and the value was 4 17s 1d Joseph Garrick a rigger and stevedore said that on the 25th inst he saw Smith and James Curry go into the Aberllelyn Arms in Front Street Milburn Place At a late hour on the same night he saw Smith go over the wall of Messrs Smith s premises enter the engine room and afterwards leave with a bag of metal He gave information to the police PC Cuerton said that at 11 40pm on the 25th inst he saw John Curry go into his house and at midnight he saw his brother leave the house and walk in the direction of his own Detective Sergt Scougal said that at noon on the 26th inst he went to the house of John Curry with a search warrant and found underneath the bed a quantity of brass which was identified as the property of Messrs Smith by the witness Craigie He then proceeded to No 9 Middle Street where he saw Smith He told him he was going to take him to the Bull Ring Police Station whereupon his wife said What s the matter Bob Accused replied There has been some brass stolen from Smith s Witness charged him with having stolen the brass and he replied I know nothing about it At five o clock the same afternoon he met the two Currys in the Borough Road and told them he was going to take them to the Bull Ring Police Station They both replied It is only a bit of spite because we would not do the same as him The following morning he charged the three of the prisoners with the theft Smith replied I have nothing to say John Curry replied We got the best part of the brass from the saw mills We only got two small pieces from Smith and gave him a couple of bob for them James in answer to the charge said they got most of the metal from the saw mills Formally charged the whole of the prisoners pleaded guilty Mr G R Duncan who represented the accused said that Smith who could produce discharges covering a period of twenty years showing an excellent character had been employed for some time as a fireman by the prosecuting firm Unfortunately having got some drink he yielded to the temptation while working on the night shift and in consequence had lost his situation Both he and his wife were most distressed about it The two Currys were licensed marine store dealers bearing good characters The Chairman said the case was too serious to be dealt with under the First Offenders Act and the amount involved was too large to permit of a fine being imposed The prisoners would each be committed for a month These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16091228264/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16091228264/ William Buckham alias Smith Name William Buckham alias Smith Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 27 July 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 75 William Buckham AKA Smith The Shields Daily News for 4 August 1905 reports At North Shields Police Court today William Buckham alias Smith 20 of no fixed abode was charged with attempting to break and enter a sweet shop on the Grand Parade Tynemouth occupied by Messrs Maynard Ltd on the 26th ult William Harvey caretaker of the shelter which adjoins a number of shops deposed to locking up the premises shortly before 10 o clock on the night in question and finding next morning that they had been broken into Annie Nichols an assistant with Messrs Maynard said the shop was left secured at one o clock on the 26th ult Sergt Charlton said he saw the accused at 3 30 in the morning leave the public shelter He accosted him and asked him what he was doing there and he replied that he had just come from Blyth Witness asked the accused what he had in his pockets and he replied Nothing On searching him he found a screw driver and upon inspecting the premises he discovered that the door of a sweet shop had been forced open There were paint marks on the tool corresponding with the colour of the paint on the door Prisoner on being formally charged pleaded not guilty and said he had nothing to say He was ordered to take his trial at the next Quarter Sessions The Shields Daily News for 19 September 1905 reports BREAKING INTO A CAF AT EAST HOWDON YOUNG MAN COMMITTED FOR TRIAL At North Shields Police Court today William Buckham 20 no fixed abode 8th appearance was charged with breaking and entering a caf at East Howdon between the 22nd and 23rd July and stealing therefrom a quantity of cigars and cigarettes a tin of sardines and a tin of salmon valued at 1 10s the property of Mr H H Higginbottom Mr G H Hall manager of the caf said that on the night of the 22nd July he left the premises secure and upon returning shortly after 10 o clock next morning he found they had been broken into Access had been obtained through the roof The skylight had been smashed and the thief had lowered himself down into the room below by means of a rope Witness examined the stock and missed the articles mentioned in the charge which were valued at 1 10s Detective Sergt Scougal put in a letter which had been received by the Chief Constable Mr J H Huish In this letter the prisoner who was in custody on another charge of breaking into a shelter confessed that he had broken into the caf and stolen the goods referred to Witness charged him and he pleaded guilty Mr Huish asked the accused if he had written the letter and he replied in the affirmative The magistrates committed the accused for trial at the Quarter Sessions A list of sentences at the Michaelmas Quarter Sessions of the Count of Northumberland was given in the Morpeth Herald of the 21 October 1905 It reports William Buckham 20 on a charge of breaking and entering at Tynemouth 12 months These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/20455629595/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/20455629595/ Anthony Russell Name Anthony Russell Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 27 May 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 29 Anthony Russell For an image of Russell s accomplice Robert Lightly see www flickr com photos twm news 19140868465 in dateposted The Shields Daily Gazette for 28 May 1904 reports TWO MINERS HAVE A NIGHT OUT FRACAS ON A NO SHIELDS FARM At North Shields Anthony Russell 27 and Robert Lightly 24 pitmen Percy Main were charged with being concerned together in stealing a duck value 10s the property of Mr Elwin on the 22nd inst Joseph Elwin said that at 4 25 am he was awakened by his father who told him that he had heard three shots fired He got up and looked out of the window and saw two men each carrying a gun on the field of the farm He went out with another lad and on getting up to men he saw that one was carrying a bundle from which he saw a hare s head protruding He asked him why he had shot the hare on his father s land They made no reply and walked away He then gave information to the police On getting back to the farm he missed a duck An officer spoke to arresting the defendants and charged them with stealing a duck Lightly replied that Russell shot the duck and took it away Russell replied that he burnt it Mr Duncan for the defence said that there was no doubt they shot the duck but it was not with a felonious intent It appeared that on the Saturday night they had taken too much drink and on the Sunday morning they got up at four o clock and took their guns into the fields Russell had seen a duck and the temptation had been too strong and he had shot it The Bench committed both defendants to prison for 14 days The prisoners were afterwards charged with threatening Joseph Elwin The prosecutor said that when he accused the two men of trespassing on the farm they both threatened to shoot him if he did not get out of their way Lightly said that he would drill rabbit holes into him Mr Duncan for the defendants denied the charges and stated that Elwin challenged the men to fight The defendants both denied the charge on oath They were both bound over in the sum of 10 in their own recognisances and sureties of 10 each or in default committed for 14 days they were also ordered to pay the costs for both sides or in default go to prison for seven days The defendant Lightly was charged with assaulting Elwin by striking him in the chest with his fist and with the muzzle end of the gun The defendants were next charged with trespassing in search of game at Chirton Hill Farm on the same date Mr Duncan submitted that the defendants had already been sufficiently punished for their offence and the summons for trespass ought to be withdrawn especially as it was taken out against the wish of Mr Elwin The Chief Constable contradicted the latter statement Mr Duncan said that Mr Elwin had stated in Court that he did not wish the case to proceed and therefore the summons could not stand The Chief Constable sad that he himself was the informant in the case and he intended to go on with it Mr Duncan took the ruling of the Court on the point and Mr Kidd decided that the Chief Constable was acting within his rights After hearing the evidence the magistrates fined defendants 10s and costs or in default 14 days imprisonment to run concurrently with the other commitments These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19172779382/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19172779382/ Jane A. Teasdale, arrested for obtaining food and lodgings by false pretences Name Jane A Teasdale Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 9 September 1915 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 250 Jane A Teasdale The Shields Daily News for 17 September 1915 reports FALSE PRETENCES CASE A SERVANT GIRL CHARGED AT NORTH SHIELDS Today at North Shields Jane Ann Teasdale 21 of Court Hill Farndale Kirby Moorside was brought up on remand charged with unlawfully and knowingly by a certain false pretence obtaining from one Elizabeth Goodwill certain food and lodgings to the amount of 7s 11d with intent to cheat and defraud between the 2nd and 8th September Elizabeth Goodwill of 3 St George s Place Front Street Cullercoats stated that at 1pm on the 2nd inst defendant came to her house and asked for a room for the winter months She said she had come from Kirby Moorside to a situation at 9 Northumberland Terrace Tynemouth and her box was there Witness took her in and on the Sunday a letter came and defendant said it was from her father who was coming to the house Witness became suspicious and went to the above address and found the place closed The father never came Later the defendant admitted having written the letter herself Witness supplied her with food to the amount of 8s Mary Sisson of 9 Northumberland Terrace Tynemouth said that defendant came to her house for a situation and said she had been sent from a registry office Witness engaged her as a day girl she had no box PC Colpitts said that at 10 30 am on the 8th inst he saw defendant at the first witness s house and took her into custody When charged she replied Get me some work to do but don t send me back home Defendant pleaded guilty and had nothing to say She was then further charged with having obtained by means of a certain false pretence 2s the property of Grace Annie Kerrick Walker on the 4th inst Grace Annie Kerrick Walker said that defendant came to her on the 4th and asked for the loan of 2s She said she was staying with Mrs Goodwill and had paid her in advance Witness gave her the 2s Mrs Goodwill recalled said from the 2nd inst to the 8th inst she never received any money from defendant PC Colpitts said that when he charged her with this offence she made nor reply Defendant pleaded guilty and said that she wanted to be sent to a home In February last year defendant was bound over for stealing shoes Miss Moffatt the missioner said she had a talk with defendant yesterday and she said she came to Whitley to be nearer her sweetheart who is a soldier Since she got into trouble her sweetheart had cast her off She said her father was good to her but her mother was not In reply to the Chairman Dr Peart Miss Moffatt said she thought the Salvation Army Home at South Shields would take her in Defendant was remanded until tomorrow These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21778172710/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21778172710/ John W. Hoole alias Thomas McNeish, arrested for stealing money Name John W Hoole alias Thomas McNeish Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 6 July 1915 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 260 John W Hoole AKA Thomas McNeish The Shields Daily News for 15 July 1915 reports PLATER S THEFT FROM A WOMAN S PURSE IN A NORTH SHIELDS FISH SHOP John Wm Hoole 23 plater was charged on remand at North Shields yesterday with having stolen on the 5th inst the sum of 10s 6d belonging to Mrs Jennie Young Prosecutrix the wife of Joseph Young residing in Roseberry Avenue Preston said about 9pm on the 5th inst she went into the fish shop at the corner of Borough Road and Gardner Street and sat down on a seat She had her purse in her hand and it contained at that time 10s 6d in silver including a half crown and three two shilling pieces Shortly afterwards the accused and two soldiers came in and sat down on the same form Witness got up and left but as soon as she got to the door she remembered she had left her purse lying on the seat She went back and saw the accused pick her purse up and hand it to a solider to give to her When she received the purse she found it was open and the money was missing The soldier sent for a policeman and the accused was taken into custody Pte Gilbert of the 2nd Dragoon Guards at present attached to the Duke of Wellington s Regiment Said he had known accused for about a week prior to the 5th inst On that night accused joined witness and another soldier in a public house He said he had no money and he had to borrow 1s from a woman before he could stand the drinks Afterwards he asked them to go to the fish and chip shop The woman who lost her purse was sitting nearest to the accused After the woman went out and came back accused picked up the purse and asked witness to give it to the woman Witness did so and as the woman was moving away accused handed witness a 2s piece saying Here s 2s for you and your mate to get a drink Witness asked him where he got the money and accused replied You never know what money you ve got When the woman complained that the money had been stolen from her purse witness sent for the police so that the matter might be cleared up Det Graham deposed to taking the accused into custody As he went towards accused he heard a jingle of money and afterwards found two 2s pieces on the floor near where he was sitting He recovered 5s from the accused in addition and also the 2s from the witness Gilbert Accused pleaded not guilty Asked to account for the 5s which was found upon him when he told the soldiers that he had no money at all earlier in the night accused said he had kept quiet about that money because he needed it to get to Southampton He had he said been working at Palmer s where he earned 4 per week The Bench found the case clearly established and a previous conviction being proved against him at the Moot Hall Newcastle where he was sent to gaol for six months for the theft of a watch and jewellery they committed him to prison for one month These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22186144615/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22186144615/ Frederick Mudd, arrested for stealing money Name Frederick Mudd Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 3 April 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 69 Frederick Mudd The Shields Daily News for 11 February 1905 reports ANOTHER FISH STEALER SENT TO PRISON At the North Shields Police Court this morning Frederick Mudd 17 years of age residing at 13 Reed Street was charged with stealing a quantity of haddocks valued at 3s the property of the Tyne Steam Fishing Coy on the 10th inst PC Spindler said that on Friday afternoon he met the accused coming from the direction of the steam trawler Tyne Belle carrying a quantity of haddocks A soon as the accused saw him he dropped the haddocks and ran away Afterwards he arrested the accused and charged him with stealing the fish to which he replied I have nothing to say A clerk representing the Tyne Steam Fishing Company estimated the value of the fish which the accused dropped at 3s The Bench committed prisoner to gaol for fourteen days with hard labour The Shields Daily News for 3 April 1905 reports LARCENY FROM A NORTH SHIELDS TRAWLER A BOY ROBS HIS BENEFACTORS At North Shields Police Court today Frederick Mudd 17 no fixed abode was charged with stealing 4s the moneys of Frederick Marriott mate of the steam trawler Volunteer on the 30th ult The Prosecutor stated that before the boat cast off on March 27th the accused came on board and in consequence of the statements he made he was taken to sea When the boat returned on the 30th ult the prisoner went ashore and witness missed 4s from his coat pocket in the cabin PC Spindler said he arrested the accused at noon on the same date He said he was very sorry he had taken the money Witness found 3s in his possession and got 3d at a cook shop where the prisoner had left it In answer to the magistrates clerk Mr R F Kidd the prosecutor said that the reason the accused was taken to sea was that he stated he had no father and no mother and accordingly they took pity on him Prisoner pleaded guilty to this charge and also to a further charge of stealing 2s 2d belonging to the third hand of the same steamer Ald Elliot said that it was very bad and very ungrateful behaviour on the part of the accused towards those who had shown him kindness by giving him food and shelter He would be committed to prison for six weeks with hard labour The Shields Daily News for 12 September 1905 reports THREE MONTHS FOR THEFT At North Shields Police Court today Frederick Mudd 17 Myock s lodging house was charged with having stolen a pair of Wellington boots valued at 3s the property of Edgar Beal a youth employed on board the steam drifter Seymolicus of Yarmouth The prosecutor deposed on the 10th inst he missed the boots from the fo c stle where he had put them two days previously PC Spindler said he saw the prisoner on the Fish Quay yesterday morning wearing the boots He charged him with having stolen them and he replied that he bought them from a man for 6d but on the way to the police station he said he might as well speak the truth and admitted that he stole the boots on Friday Chief Constable Huish said the accused who made his 7th appearance had been previously imprisoned for theft He was committed for three months with hard labour These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19557982709/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19557982709/ Jerome Guerrini Name Jerome Guerrini Arrested for Murder Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 22 July 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 53 Jerome Guerrini The Morpeth Herald for 26 November 1904 reported that At the Assizes on Saturday before Mr Justice Darling Jerome Guerrini alias Joseph Brunetti 27 fireman and a French subject was charged with the wilful murder of Patrick Gillighan on July 4th in the Borough of Tynemouth Mr Hans Hamilton in opening the case for the prosecution said prisoner for the last four years has been a seafaring man He was a Frenchman by birth having been born in Corsica although his name appeared more like an Italian one Patrick Gillighan was a labourer and resided in Clive Street North Shields It appeared that on July 2nd prisoner came with a ship into the Tyne and took up his lodgings at 82 Clive Street The deceased man lived almost directly opposite with two brothers of the name of Davis About 11 o clock of the night of July 4th a noise was heard at the back of No 10 Clive Street One of the brothers Davis went out and saw the deceased the prisoner and a friend of the latter named Petro Arteche He heard the deceased man tell the prisoner and his companion to shift as it was no place for them to commit a nuisance Davis would tell then that he saw the prisoner strike the deceased in the chest Davis told the deceased to come into the house which he did Gillighan sat down to supper and just at that moment a noise was heard at the shop door in the front street Wm Davis opened the door but saw no one The deceased also appeared to have come to the door spoken to someone in the street and proceeded immediately down an adjoining passage While he was going down a noise was heard at the back door Davis followed him down the passage and saw him with head of prisoner s friend Arteche under his right arm and was striking him The deceased also struck at the prisoner on the right side of the head causing it to bleed Then it appeared that the prisoner retired a few yards rushed at the deceased and struck him on the left side Davis saw no knife but a few seconds afterwards he was attacked by prisoner Davis avoided a blow and when the prisoner raised his hand he saw he had a knife Deceased staggered forward and fell Davis went to help him up the passage and while he was going Gillighan said Willie I am stabbed Gillighan died shortly afterwards of internal bleeding During the trial Guerrini s solicitor Mr Mitchell Innes asked the jury to find a verdict of manslaughter emphasising that he was not the aggressor and only used his knife in the heat of the moment He pointed to Gillinghan s conviction four years earlier for a serious assault on another man with a bottle and a knife Caroline Evans a married woman living in Clive Street also testified that she saw Gillighan seize the prisoner and drag him across the back lane She heard the prisoner say I am not making a noise I don t want to fight The Morpeth Herald reports that Judge Darling in his summing up said that if there was anything that distinguished a Corsican from the native of any other country it was the hotness of his blood and the constant use of the knife He thought the jury should observe this fact in the case The jury found prisoner guilty of manslaughter and he was sentenced to fifteen years penal servitude These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/15650432713/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/15650432713/ John Legg, arrested for stealing beer Name John Legg Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 19 September 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 77 John Legg For an image of one of his accomplices John Keating see www flickr com photos twm news 22984005345 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News 19 September 1905 reports THEFT OF BEER AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields Police Court today John Legg Thomas Codling and John T Keating young men were charged with stealing from the warehouse of Messrs Gray and Son wharfingers Liddell Street 10 gallons of beer valued at 14s on the 11th inst Joseph Gunn manager for the prosecutors said that in consequence of something that had previously happened he concealed himself in the warehouse on the 11th inst At 8 50pm Legg and Keating entered the yard and made their way to the beer shed He came out of hiding and caught the two men named and sent for the police PC Graham said he arrested the accused and searched them In the possession of Legg he found three spiles which he said he used to stop the beer after he tapped the barrel Witness afterwards charged all three Legg replied I did not steal all that Codling said I never stole that much and Keating answered The same for me On being formally charged the accused pleaded guilty and they were each committed to prison for one month Sadly this wasn t be be John Legg s last court appearance The Shields Daily News for 28 February 1907 reports THEFT OF IRON AT NORTH SHIELDS YOUTHS SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today John Legg 19 Skipsey s Quay Robert Richardson 17 and John Richardson 14 Union Stairs Liddell Street were charged with having stolen a quantity of iron from the Shields Engineering Company s Works Bell Street on the 27th inst PC Dixon said that at 9 50 last night he was on duty in Liddell Street near the Engineering Works when he heard a noise on the shore On going there he found a bag containing iron on the bottom of some steps and the three prisoners a few yards away He asked them what they were doing there and they said they were looking for wood While they were talking Legg went away and witness followed but was unable to find him and the iron had also disappeared He afterwards saw the three prisoners in Richardson s home and arrested them He charged them with the theft and they replied that the iron was there when they went on the shore An assistant manager of the Shields Engineering Coy valued the iron produced at 2s The two eldest prisoners pleaded guilty but John Richardson denied the charge Legg who had previously been imprisoned for larceny was sent to gaol for a month with hard labour Robert Richardson was committed for seven days in the second division and John Richardson was discharged For an image of Legg s accomplice Robert Richardson see www flickr com photos twm news 18447897895 in album 72157 These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/24138890482/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/24138890482/ Margaret Ann O'Brien, arrested for obtaining money by false pretences Name Margaret A O Brien Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 6 August 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 35 Margaret O Brien The Shields Daily Gazette for 6 August 1904 reports Margaret Ann O Brien 14 1 Queen s Terrace North Shields was charged with attempting to obtain the sum of 1 from Messrs Irvin Sons with intent to cheat and defraud them on the 5th August Remanded for eight days The Shields Daily Gazette for 13 August 1904 reports NORTH SHIELDS GIRL SENT TO GAOL At North Shields to day Margaret A O Brien 14 1 Queen s Terrace North Shields was charged on remand with unlawfully attempting to obtain from John Thos Hewitt the sum of 1 the money of Messrs Irvin and Sons fishing boat owners with intent to cheat and defraud She was further charged with obtaining 1 on another date from the same firm In the first case Mr Hewitt stated that the girl came to the office of his employer on the 5th inst and said she had been sent by Mrs Davies the wife of an engineer serving on one of their boats the Langley castle and asked for a sovereign As she had twice previously been at the office for money supposed to be for Mrs Davies but which she had never received witness detained her and sent for the police Elizabeth Ellen Davies wife of George Davies stated her husband was employed by Messrs Irvin and Sons She had never sent the accused to receive any money at the office She had only seen her once before and only knew her by sight Detective Sergt Scougal spoke to being called to Messrs Irvin and Sons office on the Fish Quay and finding the accused detained there He charged her with attempting to obtain 1 by means of false pretences and she admitted the offence At first she told him that her sister sent her but subsequently she said she had gone on her own initiative On the second charge it was stated in evidence that the accused went to the office on the 29th ult and asked for 1 for Mrs Davies This was given to her and she signed the receipt as Lily Muir Detective Scougal said when charged with the second offence she stated that a man of the name of Cook had sent her and had given her a share of the money Her story however could not be verified The accused who was crying bitterly admitted the theft in both cases The Chairman Mr F R N Haswell said the magistrates had been very much puzzled to know what to do with the accused as she did not seem to have an idea of what theft was He added that they were going to inflict a punishment upon her which it was hoped would have the effect of reclaiming her from the career in which she had started He committed her to prison for seven days on each charge There were two other cases of the same character against her but one was withdrawn and other was not gone into These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18731834155/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18731834155/ Ellen Leavy alias Burns, arrested for stealing clothes Name Ellen Leavy alias Burns Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 5 March 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 39 Ellen Leavy AKA Burns For an image of her accomplice and daughter Rose Sparrow see www flickr com photos twm news 16888885997 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 12 March 1906 reports SHOP DOOR ROBBERIES AT NORTH SHIELDS MOTHER AND DAUGHTER SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today Ellen Leavey 46 8 Barrington Lane and Rose Sparrow 26 Park Street South Shields mother and daughter were charged on remand with having on the 3rd March stolen from the shop door of No 96 Bedford Street a child s dress valued at 6s 11d or with receiving the same well knowing it to have been stolen An assistant with the prosecutrix Miss M A Hogg a draper said she missed the dress and gave information to the police Inspector Thornton said that he arrested the prisoner Sparrow in Barrington Street South Shields and charged her with the theft and she replied that she was so drunk that she knew nothing about it PC Graham said he arrested Leavey in the back lane of Sibthorpe Street she then having the dress in her possession He charged her and she made no reply They were further charged on the same date with having stolen seven blouses valued at 13s 8d from the shop door of Mr Thos Heslop draper Saville Street Prosecutor said that at 3 20 pm from what he was told he followed the prisoners down Rudyard Street back lane and found the seven blouses and two pairs of boots under the shawl of the younger prisoner The elder woman had also two pairs of boots He detained Leavey until the arrival of the police but Sparrow bolted Bridget Leavey a child of 10 and a daughter and sister of the prisoners who was with them said she saw Rosie steal the articles and give them to her mother to run way with Prisoners were also charged with having stolen four pairs of boots valued at 16s 10d from the shop door of Messrs Stead and Simpson 2 Saville Stret on the 3rd inst and further with having stolen a shawl valued at 3s from the shop door of Margaret Armstrong on the 3rd inst Similar evidence was given and upon being formally charged Leavey pleaded not guilty and Sparrow admitted the thefts and said her mother had nothing to do with them She asked to be leniently dealt with She had taken to drink in consequence of her husband having neglected her and if she was given one more chance she would keep off the drink and never enter the town again The magistrate committed them to prison for 7 days in each case one month in all The Chairman Ald Collins after giving the decision said the tradesmen were very much to blame for hanging goods outside the door If they insisted on hanging goods outside they must have someone to watch them The Chief Constable said they were indebted to Mr Heslop for the arrest of the prisoners These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22669115693/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22669115693/ Sarah Cuthill, arrested for stealing clothes Name Sarah Cuthill Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 20 July 1916 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 266 Sarah Cuthill The Shields Daily News for 21 July 1916 reports LARCENY FROM LODGINGS GIRL BOUND OVER AT NO SHIELDS At North Shields today Sarah Cuthill aged 16 of 21 Post Office Row East Hedley Hope was charged with having stolen various items of clothing to the value of 1 6s the property of Annie Clark and was further charged with the larceny of a lady s costume a pair of gloves valued at 1 19s 10d the property of Elizabeth Fitzgerald Mrs Clark said the accused came to her house 13 Charlotte Street on the 3rd inst carrying a bag and asked for lodgings She said she was working in Newcastle and had come down to North Shields for a few days She paid 5s and witness allowed her to stay until the 9th when the girl disappeared The witness then found that the girl s bag was also gone and that some clothing was missing from the house Detective Sergt Hall said he received Cuthill into custody from the Whitley police on Wednesday and she admitted the offence When arrested she was wearing a silk scarf belonging to Mrs Clark In the other case Mrs Fitzgerald 78 Princes Street stated that Cuthill came to her house and asked for lodgings at about 12 45pm on Sunday the 9th inst saying that she was employed on munition work in Newcastle and that her father was a soldier stationed at the King Edward School At about 4 o clock in the afternoon she made some excuse and went out and noticing that the girl s bag was gone witness looked around and saw that a costume was missing Running to the door she saw Cuthill walking along the street and she shouted to her The girl turned round and walked some steps toward her whereupon Mrs Fitzgerald went into the house again The girl did not follow however and when the witness looked out again she was gone Det Hall said the girl was wearing the costume at Whitley when arrested Cuthill admitted both offences Sergt Hall said there were other two charges against her at Newcastle and she had admitted those also On the defendant s promise to go to a home in Newcastle she was bound over in the sum of 5 for six months These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21834140876/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21834140876/ Christina Austin, arrested for stealing dresses Name Christina Austin Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 11 July 1916 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 266 Christina Austin For an image of her accomplice Wilhelmina Armstrong see www flickr com photos twm news 22272492656 in photostream The Shields Daily News for 12 July 1916 reports STOLEN DRESSES DURHAM GIRLS IN TROUBLE AT NORTH SHIELDS Before Ald Spencer and Mr J B Williamson at North Shields today Wilhelmina Armstrong 18 single 13 Summerville Durham City and Christina Austin 17 single 1 Lambton Walk Durham City were charged on remand with having stolen two dresses valued at 1 from the Wardrobe shop of Lottie Cooper Rudyerd Street Prosecutrix stated that on the afternoon of the 6th inst the two girls called at her shop and asked to be shown some frocks They remained in the shop about half and hour and then left saying they would return four days later On looking through her stock after the girls had gone she missed a dress and gave information to the police The girls returned on the 10th and she sent for the police who arrested them Later in the same day she was also shown by the police another dress which she also identified as her property Detective Mason said he arrested the accused on the 10th and questioned Armstrong about a dress she had been wearing at South Shields the previous day She admitted having stolen it from the shop of the prosecutrix and on the way to the police station Austin said she had also stolen a dress Afterwards he went to the house in which they had been lodging at Whitley and there recovered the two dresses Both girls pleaded guilty and said they were sorry Austin said she had never done anything of the kind before Armstrong admitted having been convicted at Darlington in April the fine being paid by her father who is a butcher at Durham Mrs Austin said her daughter left home a week ago Armstrong was fined 19s 6d with the alternative of 14 days imprisonment The bench considered that Austin had been led astray to some extent and she was bound over in the sum of 5 to be of good behaviour for 12 months These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22272492636/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22272492636/ John Dowson, arrested for stealing from a gas meter Name John Dowson Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 7 February 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 65 John Dowson For an image of his accomplice Edward Roberts see www flickr com photos twm news 19378323875 in dateposted The Shields Daily News for 14 February 1905 reports THEFT FROM PENNY IN THE SLOT METERS At North Shields Police Court to day before the Mayor and Mr J Walton Edward Roberts 19 messroom steward Blyth and John Dowson 19 seaman Wallsend were charged with having stolen on the 30th ult from an automatic gas meter at 33 Thrift Street the sum of 14s 8d the moneys of the Tynemouth Gas Company Mrs Cowey said that on the 30th ult she was removing into the house when the accused came and asked to be allowed to look through She told them the house was not to be let In passing through one of the rooms Dowson put his hand on the gas meter and remarked it was very handy They went away and next day witness found that the gas meter had been broken into and the box and money taken away George Robson a collector for the Gas Company said he had examined the meter and found that gas had been consumed to the value of 14s 8d Sergt Hall said he arrested the accused in a lodging house on the 6th inst He took them to the Bull Ring Police Station and charged them with the theft They both replied Yes that s right There was a second charge against the prisoners of stealing from a gas meter at 37 Blyth Street Percy Main the sum of 2s 4d the moneys of the Tynemouth Gas Company between February 3 and 4 Similar evidence was given in this case The accused having obtained permission were shown over the house and subsequently the money in the meter was missed The prisoners admitted the charge and said that if the magistrates would allow them to go they would refund the money Chief Constable Huish said he had only preferred two charges against the accused but there were six or eight others The prisoners were committed to gaol for 14 days in the second division for each offence one month in all The time spent in prison didn t deter Dowson and Roberts Just over a month later The Shields Daily News for 18 March 1905 reported FOUND ON ENCLOSED PREMISES AT NORTH SHIELDS SUSPICIOUS CHARACTERS SENT TO PRISON At the North Shields Police Court this morning before Mr Isaac Black in the chair and Mr G H Stansfield John Dowson 19 Gateshead and Edward Roberts 19 53 Beaumont Street Cowpen Quay were charged on remand with being found on the enclosed premises of 9 Seymour Street for an unlawful purpose at 5 pm on the 16th inst Both of the accused had been previously convicted of breaking into unoccupied houses and stealing money from gas meters and they came out of prison as recently as Monday last Mr Isaac Black the chairman said they had soon commenced again and as their recent imprisonment seemed to have been no caution to them they would each be committed for six weeks with hard labour These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18119089675/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18119089675/ Wilhelmina Armstrong, arrested for stealing dresses Name Wilhelmina Armstrong Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 11 July 1916 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 266 Wilhelmina Armstrong For an image of her accomplice Christina Austin see www flickr com photos twm news 22272492636 in dateposted The Shields Daily News for 12 July 1916 reports STOLEN DRESSES DURHAM GIRLS IN TROUBLE AT NORTH SHIELDS Before Ald Spencer and Mr J B Williamson at North Shields today Wilhelmina Armstrong 18 single 13 Summerville Durham City and Christina Austin 17 single 1 Lambton Walk Durham City were charged on remand with having stolen two dresses valued at 1 from the Wardrobe shop of Lottie Cooper Rudyerd Street Prosecutrix stated that on the afternoon of the 6th inst the two girls called at her shop and asked to be shown some frocks They remained in the shop about half and hour and then left saying they would return four days later On looking through her stock after the girls had gone she missed a dress and gave information to the police The girls returned on the 10th and she sent for the police who arrested them Later in the same day she was also shown by the police another dress which she also identified as her property Detective Mason said he arrested the accused on the 10th and questioned Armstrong about a dress she had been wearing at South Shields the previous day She admitted having stolen it from the shop of the prosecutrix and on the way to the police station Austin said she had also stolen a dress Afterwards he went to the house in which they had been lodging at Whitley and there recovered the two dresses Both girls pleaded guilty and said they were sorry Austin said she had never done anything of the kind before Armstrong admitted having been convicted at Darlington in April the fine being paid by her father who is a butcher at Durham Mrs Austin said her daughter left home a week ago Armstrong was fined 19s 6d with the alternative of 14 days imprisonment The bench considered that Austin had been led astray to some extent and she was bound over in the sum of 5 to be of good behaviour for 12 months These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22272492656/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22272492656/ Ernest Frost Name Ernest Frost Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 27 August 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 75 Ernest Frost The Shields Daily News for 29 August reports 1905 reports SERIOUS CHARGES AGAINST A SHIP S STEWARD AT NORTH SHIELDS STEALING AND SMUGGLING GOODS At North Shields Police Court today Ernest Frost 39 a steward belonging to Germany was charged with landing from the screw steamer Astrakhan 7lbs of coffee and 10lbs of tea while in the Albert Edward Dock on the 28th inst with intent to avoid payment of duty on the same He was further charged with having assaulted Wm Joseph Smith and Joseph Phealen customs officers Mr Hogg prosecuted on behalf of the Customs Wm Joseph Smith preventive officer for the customs said that on the night in question he was on patrol duty at the Albert Edward Dock when he observed two men with a cart accompanied by the defendant Witness went up to the defendant and asked him if he had anything liable to duty on the cart He replied in the negative and he then asked him to open the bags There was nothing in the first bag but in the second he found 10lbs of tea and 7lbs of coffee He asked him if duty had been paid on these and he replied that there had not and that they were part of the ship s stores He then requested the defendant to take them back to the ship and they were on their way back when the defendant jumped off the cart and struck witness twice in the face knocking him to the ground While there he kicked witness on the thigh Another officer came to his assistance and he was assaulted The defendant was not drunk John Phealan Customs officer spoke to going to the last witness s assistance when the defendant struck witness on the forehead and kicked him on the shins The accused said he was drunk and did not know what he was doing On the first charge he was ordered to pay single value and duty 1 2s and costs and fined 20s and costs or one month for each assault A further charge of stealing several article of food value 3 4s 6d from the ss Astrakhan was also preferred against the accused Supt Jamieson RTP prosecuted John Biddick master of the Astrakhan identified the articles produced as the property of his owners He said the accused was engaged as steward on board the vessel and had charge of these articles He was discharged on the 28th inst on account of drunkenness during the voyage Mr Smith said that in another bag in the accused s possession he found several articles of food which were concealed amongst his clothing Sub Inspector Leech said that when charged the defendant made no reply Accused no stated that he was drunk and in such a nervous condition that he did not know what he was doing He was committed to prison for two months These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16071294064/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16071294064/ Kingsley Bryce Speakman Smellie, c1950s LSE Professor of Political Science 1949 1965 Extracts from Professor K B S Smellie by C M R in The LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 21 Professor K B S Smellie Professor Emeritus of Political Science died in London on 30 November 1987 Only three days earlier a notice had appeared in The Times expressing his appreciation for the cards and flowers sent to him for his ninetieth birthday and his regret that because he was in hospital he could not celebrate with his friends in the normal champagne manner For K B as he was affectionately known such celebrations to mark the passing years had over the last decades become very much part of the currency of life This was not only because he rejoiced in the birthdays and anniversaries themselves but because they gave the opportunity for family and friends to come together at his home in Wimbledon to be generously entertained drawn into stimulating conversation on whatever intellectual problem was currently in the forefront of his mind and delighted by the humour felicity and incisiveness with which he would reply to the toast for the occasion More often than not the toast would be proposed by a former student of his who subsequently became a colleague and a friend For K B the three categories were largely indistinguishable and the resulting loyalties and affections were two way and lasting Kingsley Bryce Speakman Smellie was born in London on 22 November 1897 of Scottish parents who were on the stage He was educated first at a Dame School in Hammersmith and then at Latymer Upper School After the First World War he went up to St John s College Cambridge on a scholarship and obtained a First in both parts of the History Tripos In 1925 he went to Harvard Law School for a year on a Laura Spelman Rockefeller studentship and acquired the abiding fascination with the institutions of the American democracy which he always retained That year apart Smellie s whole academic career was spent on the staff of the Government Department of the School He had become a public administration assistant to Graham Wallas the first Professor of Political Science in 1921 a Lecturer in Public Administration in 1929 and a reader in Political Science in 1939 and was appointed to a personal chair in Political Science in January 1949 This he held until he reached retirement age in 1965 when he became Emeritus Twelve years later the School happily made him an Honorary Fellow He published nine books between 1928 and 1962 but it was orally perhaps more than in his writings that Smellie excelled and exercised a profound influence on generations of students The style was one of scepticism paradox aphorism of delight in ideas and intellectual provocation of much knowledge combined with an element of self depreciation and of infectious enthusiasm and wit Few who had the experience of lectures by or tutorials with K B thumbs tucked into his characteristic fawn waistcoat surmounted by an elegant French bow tie eyes twinkling and intellectual argument flowing will forget those happy experiences or what they learnt and derived from them In the sphere of public administration Smellie drew fruitfully on the practical knowledge he gained during the Second World War when he served first in the BBC s Propaganda Research Unit July to December 1940 and then as a temporary administrative civil servant from December 1940 to April 1942 in the Ministry of Home Security bomb recording work and then till January 1945 in the Board of Trade clothes rationing Before and after his temporary service Smellie was among those who lectured in Cambridge where the School was evacuated There were two other profound influences in K B s life The first was his marriage in 1931 to Stephanie Narlian one of his former students This was a happy and successful partnership in which in their qualities their activities and interests they complemented each other superbly The other influence was notable for what it did not do K B served as a Private in the London Scottish in France in the First World War and in April 1917 an exploding shell necessitated the amputation of his left leg below the knee and of his right foot For all the seventy years that followed he had two wooden prostheses But never once did he allow this to interfere with a full life which included playing table tennis driving a car in a manner which became somewhat notorious and a propensity for many years to consider attendance at West End cinemas to see the latest films as an extension of the facilities of the School IMAGELIBRARY 619 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/4088517369/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/4088517369/