RSS Feed for hill http://solvonauts.org/%3Faction%3Drss_search%26term%3Dhill RSS Feed for hill Professor A.W.H (Bill) Phillips with Phillips Machine c1958-67 Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons Reference IMAGELIBRARY 6 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3833724890/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3833724890/ Unveiling of the restored Phillips Machine, 29th June 1989 Left to right The team that restored the Phillips Machine Colin Carter a professional engineer Professor James Meade Professor Walter Newlyn University of Leeds LSE Alumnus Dr Nicholas Barr Reza Moghadam Research Assistant LSE Student Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 401 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983651036/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983651036/ Professor James Meade, 1993 With restored Phillips Machine Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 282 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983645714/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983645714/ Professor James Meade with Phillips Machine, 1996 Professor of Commerce at LSE 1947 1957 received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences jointly in 1977 Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 724 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/4111988802/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/4111988802/ Professor A.W.H (Bill) Phillips Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 244 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925743897/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925743897/ Restored Phillips Machine, 1993 Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Barr LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 442 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093924/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093924/ Sarah Cuthill, arrested for stealing clothes Name Sarah Cuthill Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 20 July 1916 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 266 Sarah Cuthill The Shields Daily News for 21 July 1916 reports LARCENY FROM LODGINGS GIRL BOUND OVER AT NO SHIELDS At North Shields today Sarah Cuthill aged 16 of 21 Post Office Row East Hedley Hope was charged with having stolen various items of clothing to the value of 1 6s the property of Annie Clark and was further charged with the larceny of a lady s costume a pair of gloves valued at 1 19s 10d the property of Elizabeth Fitzgerald Mrs Clark said the accused came to her house 13 Charlotte Street on the 3rd inst carrying a bag and asked for lodgings She said she was working in Newcastle and had come down to North Shields for a few days She paid 5s and witness allowed her to stay until the 9th when the girl disappeared The witness then found that the girl s bag was also gone and that some clothing was missing from the house Detective Sergt Hall said he received Cuthill into custody from the Whitley police on Wednesday and she admitted the offence When arrested she was wearing a silk scarf belonging to Mrs Clark In the other case Mrs Fitzgerald 78 Princes Street stated that Cuthill came to her house and asked for lodgings at about 12 45pm on Sunday the 9th inst saying that she was employed on munition work in Newcastle and that her father was a soldier stationed at the King Edward School At about 4 o clock in the afternoon she made some excuse and went out and noticing that the girl s bag was gone witness looked around and saw that a costume was missing Running to the door she saw Cuthill walking along the street and she shouted to her The girl turned round and walked some steps toward her whereupon Mrs Fitzgerald went into the house again The girl did not follow however and when the witness looked out again she was gone Det Hall said the girl was wearing the costume at Whitley when arrested Cuthill admitted both offences Sergt Hall said there were other two charges against her at Newcastle and she had admitted those also On the defendant s promise to go to a home in Newcastle she was bound over in the sum of 5 for six months These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 TWAM ref DX1388 1 This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images The album doesn t record the details of each prisoner s crimes just their names and dates of arrest In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots staff from Tyne Wear Archives Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the Shields Daily News looking for newspaper reports of the court cases The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds both civilians and soldiers Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21834140876/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/21834140876/ The Colony, Achill The Colony, Achill http://farm1.staticflickr.com/674/21330853923_c5845309a6_b.jpg http://farm1.staticflickr.com/674/21330853923_c5845309a6_b.jpg Portrait of Lord Alan Spencer-Churchill seated and wearing a striped shirt Portrait of Lord Alan Spencer-Churchill seated and wearing a striped shirt http://farm1.staticflickr.com/281/31531558393_947a0fe081_b.jpg http://farm1.staticflickr.com/281/31531558393_947a0fe081_b.jpg Cockhill, County Donegal Cockhill, County Donegal http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8364/29875804241_a6d9fa7486_b.jpg http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8364/29875804241_a6d9fa7486_b.jpg B0021P0054 Preparing to pin the the tarsal joint to immobilise it and improve achilles tendon healing http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829743169/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829743169/ B0021P0065 A cat recovering from a procedure to repair an achilles tendon injury https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830294534/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830294534/ B0021P0053 Preparing to pin the the tarsal joint to immobilise it and improve achilles tendon healing http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829742869/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829742869/ B0021P0064 Applying a supportive cast to an achilles tendon repair https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830294178/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830294178/ B0021P0063 Closure of the surgical site of an achilles repair https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829745793/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829745793/ B0021P0051 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829742249/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829742249/ B0021P0062 Closure of the surgical site of an achilles repair https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830293668/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830293668/ B0021P0050 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830290202/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830290202/ B0021P0061 An achilles tendon repair with all stages completed except for closure https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829745125/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829745125/ B0021P0049 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829741091/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829741091/ B0021P0060 Trimming a pin to immobilise the tarsal joint and improve achilles tendon healing https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829744789/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829744789/ B0021P0048 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829740575/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829740575/ B0021P0059 Placing a pin to immobilise the tarsal joint and improve achilles tendon healing https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830292728/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830292728/ B0021P0047 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830288462/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830288462/ B0021P0058 Placing a pin to immobilise the tarsal joint and improve achilles tendon healing https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829744255/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829744255/ B0021P0046 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829739717/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829739717/ B0021P0057 Placing a pin to immobilise the tarsal joint and improve achilles tendon healing https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830292132/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830292132/ B0021P0045 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829739451/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829739451/ B0021P0056 Placing a pin to immobilise the tarsal joint and improve achilles tendon healing https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829743731/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829743731/ B0021P0044 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830287512/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830287512/ B0021P0043 Positioning a plate to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829738849/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829738849/ B0021P0054 Preparing to pin the the tarsal joint to immobilise it and improve achilles tendon healing https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829743169/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829743169/ B0021P0042 Repairing a cat achilles tendon using apositional suturing Other tendons are repaired to their corresponding remnants as well http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829738537/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829738537/ B0021P0053 Preparing to pin the the tarsal joint to immobilise it and improve achilles tendon healing https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829742869/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829742869/ B0021P0041 Repairing a cat achilles tendon using apositional suturing Other tendons are repaired to their corresponding remnants as well http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830286598/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830286598/ B0021P0039 Repairing a cat achilles tendon using apositional suturing Other tendons are repaired to their corresponding remnants as well http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829738031/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829738031/ B0021P0051 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829742249/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829742249/ B0021P0038 Repairing a cat achilles tendon using apositional suturing Other tendons are repaired to their corresponding remnants as well http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830286062/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830286062/ B0021P0050 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830290202/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830290202/ B0021P0037 Repairing a cat achilles tendon using apositional suturing Other tendons are repaired to their corresponding remnants as well http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829737479/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829737479/ B0021P0049 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829741091/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829741091/ B0021P0036 Repairing a cat achilles tendon using apositional suturing Other tendons are repaired to their corresponding remnants as well http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829737183/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829737183/ B0021P0048 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829740575/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5829740575/ B0021P0035 Repairing a cat achilles tendon using apositional suturing Other tendons are repaired to their corresponding remnants as well http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830285254/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830285254/ B0021P0047 Attaching a plate with suture to aid stability in an achilles tendon injury https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830288462/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/nottinghamvets/5830288462/ B0021P0034 Repairing a cat achilles tendon 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