RSS Feed for in http://solvonauts.org/%3Faction%3Drss_search%26term%3Din RSS Feed for in IV (MIT) IV (MIT) Includes audio video content AV selected lectures AV faculty introductions AV special element video The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering as well as their interrelationships and applications These disciplines are Materials and Structures M Computers and Programming C Fluid Mechanics F Thermodynamics T Propulsion P and Signals and Systems S In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems SP Throughout the year the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines Includes audio video content AV selected lectures AV faculty introductions AV special element video The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering as well as their interrelationships and applications These disciplines are Materials and Structures M Computers and Programming C Fluid Mechanics F Thermodynamics T Propulsion P and Signals and Systems S In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems SP Throughout the year the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/aeronautics-and-astronautics/16-01-unified-engineering-i-ii-iii-iv-fall-2005-spring-2006 http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/aeronautics-and-astronautics/16-01-unified-engineering-i-ii-iii-iv-fall-2005-spring-2006 IV (MIT) IV (MIT) The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering as well as their interrelationships and applications nbsp These disciplines are Materials and Structures M Computers and Programming C Fluid Mechanics F Thermodynamics T Propulsion P and Signals and Systems S nbsp In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems SP nbsp Throughout the year the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines Technical RequirementsMicrosoft 174 Excel software 160 is recommended for viewing the xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering as well as their interrelationships and applications nbsp These disciplines are Materials and Structures M Computers and Programming C Fluid Mechanics F Thermodynamics T Propulsion P and Signals and Systems S nbsp In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems SP nbsp Throughout the year the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines Technical RequirementsMicrosoft 174 Excel software 160 is recommended for viewing the xls files http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/37146 http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/37146 Readme file for Introduction to OO Programming in Java This readme file contains details of links to all the Introduction to OO Programming in Java module s material held on Jorum and information about the module as well http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/10949/1987 http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/10949/1987 7.88J Protein Folding Problem (MIT) 7.88J Protein Folding Problem (MIT) This course focuses on the mechanisms by which the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains proteins determine their three dimensional conformation Topics in this course include sequence determinants of secondary structure the folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains within cells folding intermediates aggregation and competing off pathway reactions and the unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro Additional topics covered are the role of helper proteins such as chaperonins and isomerases protein recovery problems in the biotechnology industry and diseases found associated with protein folding defects This course focuses on the mechanisms by which the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains proteins determine their three dimensional conformation Topics in this course include sequence determinants of secondary structure the folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains within cells folding intermediates aggregation and competing off pathway reactions and the unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro Additional topics covered are the role of helper proteins such as chaperonins and isomerases protein recovery problems in the biotechnology industry and diseases found associated with protein folding defects http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45544 http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45544 Graham Wallas (right), K.B. Smellie (left), 1925 Picture given by Anne Bohm Extracts from Portraits from the Past Graham Wallas 1858 1932 by W A Robson from LSE Magazine May 1971 No41 p 5 The son of an Anglican clergyman he went to Shrewsbury and then to Corpus Christi College Oxford where he read classics His first post was as a schoolmaster at Highgate School but he left after a few years on a question of religious conformity He then became an extension lecturer in London University in 1890 He joined the Fabian Society in its early days and wrote one of the original Fabian Essays As a friend and colleague of the Webbs and Bernard Shaw he played a leading part in the creation and development of LSE from the day of its conception in August 1894 at the farm near Godalming where the four were staying until the end of his active life He was a lecturer at the School from 1895 and later became its first Professor of Political Science Wallas was much greater as teacher than as a writer As H G Wells remarked in his Autobiography the London School of Economics will testify how much the personal Graham Wallas outdid the published Graham Wallas there is scarcely any considerable figure among the younger generation of publicists who does not owe something to his slow fussy mannered penetrating and inspiring counsels Of his own debt Wells wrote I cannot measure justly the influence of the disinterested life he led on my own It was I think very considerable Many of us who were his students and friends feel a similar debt No small part of Wallas influence was due to his lovable personality and the spirit of benevolence and altruism which shone through him at all times Extracts from Professor K B S Smellie by C M R in The LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 21 Professor K B S Smellie Professor Emeritus of Political Science died in London on 30 November 1987 Only three days earlier a notice had appeared in The Times expressing his appreciation for the cards and flowers sent to him for his ninetieth birthday and his regret that because he was in hospital he could not celebrate with his friends in the normal champagne manner For K B as he was affectionately known such celebrations to mark the passing years had over the last decades become very much part of the currency of life This was not only because he rejoiced in the birthdays and anniversaries themselves but because they gave the opportunity for family and friends to come together at his home in Wimbledon to be generously entertained drawn into stimulating conversation on whatever intellectual problem was currently in the forefront of his mind and delighted by the humour felicity and incisiveness with which he would reply to the toast for the occasion More often than not the toast would be proposed by a former student of his who subsequently became a colleague and a friend For K B the three categories were largely indistinguishable and the resulting loyalties and affections were two way and lasting Kingsley Bryce Speakman Smellie was born in London on 22 November 1897 of Scottish parents who were on the stage He was educated first at a Dame School in Hammersmith and then at Latymer Upper School After the First World War he went up to St John s College Cambridge on a scholarship and obtained a First in both parts of the History Tripos In 1925 he went to Harvard Law School for a year on a Laura Spelman Rockefeller studentship and acquired the abiding fascination with the institutions of the American democracy which he always retained That year apart Smellie s whole academic career was spent on the staff of the Government Department of the School He had become a public administration assistant to Graham Wallas the first Professor of Political Science in 1921 a Lecturer in Public Administration in 1929 and a reader in Political Science in 1939 and was appointed to a personal chair in Political Science in January 1949 This he held until he reached retirement age in 1965 when he became Emeritus Twelve years later the School happily made him an Honorary Fellow He published nine books between 1928 and 1962 but it was orally perhaps more than in his writings that Smellie excelled and exercised a profound influence on generations of students The style was one of scepticism paradox aphorism of delight in ideas and intellectual provocation of much knowledge combined with an element of self depreciation and of infectious enthusiasm and wit Few who had the experience of lectures by or tutorials with K B thumbs tucked into his characteristic fawn waistcoat surmounted by an elegant French bow tie eyes twinkling and intellectual argument flowing will forget those happy experiences or what they learnt and derived from them In the sphere of public administration Smellie drew fruitfully on the practical knowledge he gained during the Second World War when he served first in the BBC s Propaganda Research Unit July to December 1940 and then as a temporary administrative civil servant from December 1940 to April 1942 in the Ministry of Home Security bomb recording work and then till January 1945 in the Board of Trade clothes rationing Before and after his temporary service Smellie was among those who lectured in Cambridge where the School was evacuated There were two other profound influences in K B s life The first was his marriage in 1931 to Stephanie Narlian one of his former students This was a happy and successful partnership in which in their qualities their activities and interests they complemented each other superbly The other influence was notable for what it did not do K B served as a Private in the London Scottish in France in the First World War and in April 1917 an exploding shell necessitated the amputation of his left leg below the knee and of his right foot For all the seventy years that followed he had two wooden prostheses But never once did he allow this to interfere with a full life which included playing table tennis driving a car in a manner which became somewhat notorious and a propensity for many years to consider attendance at West End cinemas to see the latest films as an extension of the facilities of the School IMAGELIBRARY 269 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983645400/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983645400/ Readme file for Structured Systems Analysis This readme file contains details of links to all the Readme file for Structured Systems Analysis module s material held on Jorum and information about the module as well http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/10949/2197 http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/10949/2197 John T. Keating, arrested for stealing sash weights Name John T Keating Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 10th September 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 57 John T Keating For an image of his accomplice Charles Johnson see www flickr com photos twm news 6628453871 in album 721576 The Shields Daily News for 10 September 1904 reports NORTH SHIELDS YOUTHS SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today two youths named respectively John T Keating and Charles Johnson were each committed to prison for stealing four sash weights value 5s the property of Messrs S G Ward and Son from a house in Stewart s Bank on the 6th This wasn t to be Keating s last offence The Shields Daily News 19 September 1905 reports THEFT OF BEER AT NORTH SHIELDS At North Shields Police Court today John Legg Thomas Codling and John T Keating young men were charged with stealing from the warehouse of Messrs Gray and Son wharfingers Liddell Street 10 gallons of beer valued at 14s on the 11th inst Joseph Gunn manager for the prosecutors said that in consequence of something that had previously happened he concealed himself in the warehouse on the 11th inst At 8 50pm Legg and Keating entered the yard and made their way to the beer shed He came out of hiding and caught the two men named and sent for the police PC Graham said he arrested the accused and searched them In the possession of Legg he found three spiles which he said he used to stop the beer after he tapped the barrel Witness afterwards charged all three Legg replied I did not steal all that Codling said I never stole that much and Keating answered The same for me On being formally charged the accused pleaded guilty and they were each committed to prison for one month For an image of his accomplice John Legg see www flickr com photos twm news 24138890482 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 18 November 1907 reports At North Shields Police Court today before Coun Sanderson and Mr Jas Walton George Edward Whiting 20 Robert Richardson 18 John Thomas Keating 22 and Jos Walker 19 were charged with breaking and entering between 6pm on Nov 15th and 9am on Nov 16th marine store at Black Cock Quay Clive Street and stewaling therefrom a cash box containing 4s 6d in money a pair of opera glasses value 10s and a number of foreign coins valued 1s the property of Messrs Morris and Coy Solomon Morris who trades under the style of Morris and Co said he left the premises secure at six pm last Friday and next morning he found that they had been broken into and the money and goods mentioned in the charge were missing Witness found that an entrance had been effected by forcing away a board which had been nailed across a window Inspector Proud said he apprehended Whiting at a house in Union Stairs He then went to South Shields and received Richardson into custody from the police He had been arrested while offering the opera glasses in pledge Witness arrested Keating and Walker in an attic in Liddell Street He jointly charged the four men with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a cash box containing 4s 6d a pair of opera glasses and a number of foreign coins Whiting replied I have nothing to say Richardson said I can say there was only 2s 6d in the cash box and we shared it out receiving 8d each Keating s answer was I have nothing to say it s true and Walker replied I have nothing to say that s right Witness recovered the opera glasses and coins from the South Shields police and found the cash box in Linskill Bank leading from Clive Street to the Ropery Banks The accused who had nothing further to say were committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions The Shields Daily News for 3 January 1908 reports from Northumberland Quarter Sessions SHOPBREAKING AT TYNEMOUTH Joseph Walker 19 labourer John Thomas Keating 22 labourer Robert Richardson 18 miner and George Edward Whiting 20 cartman all pleaded guilty to a charge of breaking and entering the shop of Messrs Morris and C and stealing a cash box a pair of opera glasses a number of foreign coins and the sum of 4s 6d in money Inspector Proud in answer to the Bench said all the lads had been previously convicted The Chairman said they wished to give two of the prisoners a chance to reform Therefore they sentenced Walker to twelve months imprisonment with hard labour under the Borstal system and Richardson was discharged on entering into his own recognisances of 5 to be of good behaviour for twelve months Keating whose record was commented on by the Bench as being a very bad one and who was described by the Chairman as the leader of the gang was sentenced to six months imprisonment with hard labour and Whiting to three months with hard labour For an image of Keating s accomplice Robert Richardson see www flickr com photos twm news 18447897895 in album 72157 These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22984005345/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/22984005345/ 16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT) 16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT) This course surveys a variety of reasoning optimization and decision making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids The focus is on principles algorithms and their applications taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction heuristic and constraint based search model based reasoning planning and execution reasoning under uncertainty and machine learning Optimization paradigms include linear integer and dynamic programming Decision making paradigms include decision theoretic planning and Markov decision processes This course is offered both to undergraduate 16 410 students as a professional area undergraduate subject in the field of aerospace information This course surveys a variety of reasoning optimization and decision making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids The focus is on principles algorithms and their applications taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction heuristic and constraint based search model based reasoning planning and execution reasoning under uncertainty and machine learning Optimization paradigms include linear integer and dynamic programming Decision making paradigms include decision theoretic planning and Markov decision processes This course is offered both to undergraduate 16 410 students as a professional area undergraduate subject in the field of aerospace information http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/36896 http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/36896 Unveiling of the restored Phillips Machine, 29th June 1989 Left to right The team that restored the Phillips Machine Colin Carter a professional engineer Professor James Meade Professor Walter Newlyn University of Leeds LSE Alumnus Dr Nicholas Barr Reza Moghadam Research Assistant LSE Student Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 401 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983651036/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983651036/ 16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT) 16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making (MIT) This course surveys a variety of reasoning optimization and decision making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids The focus is on principles algorithms and their applications taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction heuristic and constraint based search model based reasoning planning and execution reasoning under uncertainty and machine learning Optimization paradigms include linear integer and dynamic programming Decision making paradigms include decision theoretic planning and Markov decision processes This course is offered both to undergraduate 16 410 students as a professional area undergraduate subject in the field of aerospace information This course surveys a variety of reasoning optimization and decision making methodologies for creating highly autonomous systems and decision support aids The focus is on principles algorithms and their applications taken from the disciplines of artificial intelligence and operations research Reasoning paradigms include logic and deduction heuristic and constraint based search model based reasoning planning and execution reasoning under uncertainty and machine learning Optimization paradigms include linear integer and dynamic programming Decision making paradigms include decision theoretic planning and Markov decision processes This course is offered both to undergraduate 16 410 students as a professional area undergraduate subject in the field of aerospace information http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/71858 http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/71858 Professor James Meade with Phillips Machine, 1996 Professor of Commerce at LSE 1947 1957 received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences jointly in 1977 Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 724 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/4111988802/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/4111988802/ Robert Richardson, miner, arrested for breaking and entering a marine store Name Robert Richardson Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 18 November 1907 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 117 Robert Richardson For an image of his accomplice John Thomas Keating see www flickr com photos twm news 22984005345 in album 72157 The Shields Daily News for 18 November 1907 reports At North Shields Police Court today before Coun Sanderson and Mr Jas Walton George Edward Whiting 20 Robert Richardson 18 John Thomas Keating 22 and Jos Walker 19 were charged with breaking and entering between 6pm on Nov 15th and 9am on Nov 16th marine store at Black Cock Quay Clive Street and stealing therefrom a cash box containing 4s 6d in money a pair of opera glasses value 10s and a number of foreign coins valued 1s the property of Messrs Morris and Coy Solomon Morris who trades under the style of Morris and Co said he left the premises secure at six pm last Friday and next morning he found that they had been broken into and the money and goods mentioned in the charge were missing Witness found that an entrance had been effected by forcing away a board which had been nailed across a window Inspector Proud said he apprehended Whiting at a house in Union Stairs He then went to South Shields and received Richardson into custody from the police He had been arrested while offering the opera glasses in pledge Witness arrested Keating and Walker in an attic in Liddell Street He jointly charged the four men with breaking and entering the premises and stealing a cash box containing 4s 6d a pair of opera glasses and a number of foreign coins Whiting replied I have nothing to say Richardson said I can say there was only 2s 6d in the cash box and we shared it out receiving 8d each Keating s answer was I have nothing to say it s true and Walker replied I have nothing to say that s right Witness recovered the opera glasses and coins from the South Shields police and found the cash box in Linskill Bank leading from Clive Street to the Ropery Banks The accused who had nothing further to say were committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions The Shields Daily News for 3 January 1908 reports from Northumberland Quarter Sessions SHOPBREAKING AT TYNEMOUTH Joseph Walker 19 labourer John Thomas Keating 22 labourer Robert Richardson 18 miner and George Edward Whiting 20 cartman all pleaded guilty to a charge of breaking and entering the shop of Messrs Morris and C and stealing a cash box a pair of opera glasses a number of foreign coins and the sum of 4s 6d in money Inspector Proud in answer to the Bench said all the lads had been previously convicted The Chairman said they wished to give two of the prisoners a chance to reform Therefore they sentenced Walker to twelve months imprisonment with hard labour under the Borstal system and Richardson was discharged on entering into his own recognisances of 5 to be of good behaviour for twelve months Keating whose record was commented on by the Bench as being a very bad one and who was described by the Chairman as the leader of the gang was sentenced to six months imprisonment with hard labour and Whiting to three months with hard labour This wasn t Robert Richardson s first offence The Shields Daily News for 28 February 1907 reports THEFT OF IRON AT NORTH SHIELDS YOUTHS SENT TO PRISON At North Shields Police Court today John Legg 19 Skipsey s Quay Robert Richardson 17 and John Richardson 14 Union Stairs Liddell Street were charged with having stolen a quantity of iron from the Shields Engineering Company s Works Bell Street on the 27th inst PC Dixon said that at 9 50 last night he was on duty in Liddell Street near the Engineering Works when he heard a noise on the shore On going there he found a bag containing iron on the bottom of some steps and the three prisoners a few yards away He asked them what they were doing there and they said they were looking for wood While they were talking Legg went away and witness followed but was unable to find him and the iron had also disappeared He afterwards saw the three prisoners in Richardson s home and arrested them He charged them with the theft and they replied that the iron was there when they went on the shore An assistant manager of the Shields Engineering Coy valued the iron produced at 2s The two eldest prisoners pleaded guilty but John Richardson denied the charge Legg who had previously been imprisoned for larceny was sent to gaol for a month with hard labour Robert Richardson was committed for seven days in the second division and John Richardson was discharged For an image of Richardson s accomplice John Legg see www flickr com photos twm news 24138890482 in album 72157 These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18447897895/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/18447897895/ 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing Students will also gain some hands on exposure to powerful high level tools for making computers do amazing things without the need for conventional programming languages Since 15 564 is an introductory course no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing Students will also gain some hands on exposure to powerful high level tools for making computers do amazing things without the need for conventional programming languages Since 15 564 is an introductory course no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/sloan-school-of-management/15-564-information-technology-i-spring-2003 http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/sloan-school-of-management/15-564-information-technology-i-spring-2003 Restored Phillips Machine, 1993 Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Barr LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 442 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093924/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093924/ Professor James Meade, 1993 With restored Phillips Machine Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 282 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983645714/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3983645714/ Professor A.W.H (Bill) Phillips with Phillips Machine c1958-67 Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons Reference IMAGELIBRARY 6 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3833724890/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3833724890/ SP.776 Design for Demining (MIT) SP.776 Design for Demining (MIT) Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting removing and disposing of landmines Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in 20 000 civilian victims every year MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment Technical business and customer aspects are addressed Students learn about demining while they design develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community Past students have invented or improved hand tools protective gear safety equipment educational graphics and teaching materials Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands Course work is Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting removing and disposing of landmines Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in 20 000 civilian victims every year MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment Technical business and customer aspects are addressed Students learn about demining while they design develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community Past students have invented or improved hand tools protective gear safety equipment educational graphics and teaching materials Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands Course work is http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45534 http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45534 EC.S06 Design for Demining (MIT) EC.S06 Design for Demining (MIT) Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting removing and disposing of landmines Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in more than 10 000 civilian victims every year MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment Technical business and customer aspects are addressed Students learn about demining while they design develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community Past students have invented or improved hand tools protective gear safety equipment educational graphics and teaching materials Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands Cour Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting removing and disposing of landmines Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in more than 10 000 civilian victims every year MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment Technical business and customer aspects are addressed Students learn about demining while they design develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community Past students have invented or improved hand tools protective gear safety equipment educational graphics and teaching materials Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands Cour http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/edgerton-center/ec-s06-design-for-demining-spring-2007 http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/edgerton-center/ec-s06-design-for-demining-spring-2007 IV (MIT) The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering as well as their interrelationships and applications nbsp These disciplines are Materials and Structures M Computers and Programming C Fluid Mechanics F Thermodynamics T Propulsion P and Signals and Systems S nbsp In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems SP nbsp Throughout the year the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines Technical RequirementsMicrosoft 174 Excel software 160 is recommended for viewing the xls files https://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/37146 https://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/37146 Options and futures markets Options and futures markets Wyn has been a member of staff at Nottingham since 1990 and became a Professor in August 2010 His research interests lie in global food prices and volatility competition in vertical food chains price transmission commodity futures markets food price inflation Teaching interests lie in microeconomics and options and futures markets Wyn gained one of the first Lord Dearing Awards for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in 1999 and in September 2007 he gained a commendation in the Student Nominated category of the Economics Network Annual Learning and Teaching Awards In 2006 he was appointed to be the University s Director of e Learning and in August 2007 he became the University s Director of Teaching and Learning a post he continues to hold He is also an Associate Director of th Wyn has been a member of staff at Nottingham since 1990 and became a Professor in August 2010 His research interests lie in global food prices and volatility competition in vertical food chains price transmission commodity futures markets food price inflation Teaching interests lie in microeconomics and options and futures markets Wyn gained one of the first Lord Dearing Awards for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in 1999 and in September 2007 he gained a commendation in the Student Nominated category of the Economics Network Annual Learning and Teaching Awards In 2006 he was appointed to be the University s Director of e Learning and in August 2007 he became the University s Director of Teaching and Learning a post he continues to hold He is also an Associate Director of th As taught Spring 2011 Options and Futures Markets Module Guide Module Code L14080 Total Credits 15 Offering School Economics Suitable for study at postgraduate Level The content presented here provides information for prospective students on module L14080 Options and Futures Markets offered by the School of Economics University of Nottingham The module convenor is Professor W Morgan Professor Wyn Morgan School of Economics University of Nottingham Wyn has been a member of staff at Nottingham since 1990 and became a Professor in August 2010 His research interests lie in global food prices and volatility competition in vertical food chains price transmission commodity futures markets food price inflation Teaching interests lie in microeconomics and option As taught Spring 2011 Options and Futures Markets Module Guide Module Code L14080 Total Credits 15 Offering School Economics Suitable for study at postgraduate Level The content presented here provides information for prospective students on module L14080 Options and Futures Markets offered by the School of Economics University of Nottingham The module convenor is Professor W Morgan Professor Wyn Morgan School of Economics University of Nottingham Wyn has been a member of staff at Nottingham since 1990 and became a Professor in August 2010 His research interests lie in global food prices and volatility competition in vertical food chains price transmission commodity futures markets food price inflation Teaching interests lie in microeconomics and option http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/resources/resource.aspx?hid=eb0d6732-ef2f-0049-c269-abed1ad5091e http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/resources/resource.aspx?hid=eb0d6732-ef2f-0049-c269-abed1ad5091e IV (MIT) The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering as well as their interrelationships and applications These disciplines are Materials and Structures M Computers and Programming C Fluid Mechanics F Thermodynamics T Propulsion P and Signals and Systems S In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems SP Throughout the year the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines http://www.core.org.cn/OcwWeb/Aeronautics-and-Astronautics/16-01Fall-2005-Spring-2006/CourseHome/index.htm http://www.core.org.cn/OcwWeb/Aeronautics-and-Astronautics/16-01Fall-2005-Spring-2006/CourseHome/index.htm IV (MIT) The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering as well as their interrelationships and applications These disciplines are Materials and Structures M Computers and Programming C Fluid Mechanics F Thermodynamics T Propulsion P and Signals and Systems S In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems SP Throughout the year the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/aeronautics-and-astronautics/16-01-unified-engineering-i-ii-iii-iv-fall-2005-spring-2006 https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/aeronautics-and-astronautics/16-01-unified-engineering-i-ii-iii-iv-fall-2005-spring-2006 Professor A.W.H (Bill) Phillips Extracts from The Phillips Machine Project by Nicholas Bar LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 3 A W H Bill Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles He reached London in 1938 via the Trans Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners Back in Britain he took the BSc Econ 1946 49 special subject sociology He developed a great interest in economics and like many of his generation became very caught up with Keynesian theory Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going With Walter Newlyn an undergraduate contemporary later Professor of Economics at Leeds University to help with the economic theory he fell back on his engineering training He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes With a grant of 100 obtained with Newlyn s help he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon living on air as James Meade was later to put it working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model In the machine he constructed the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes with outflows representing savings taxes and imports and inflows representing investment government spending and exports The model had three tanks representing the stock of money one for transaction balances and one for foreign held sterling balances The whole system determined the level of income the rate of interest imports exports and the exchange to an accuracy astonishing at the time of two per cent The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy The machine in the jargon was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which with the enthusiastic support of James Meade then Professor of Commerce at the School Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins seminar in November 1949 Those attending gazed in wonder at this large 7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep thing in the middle of the room Phillips chain smoking paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard Then he switched the machine on And it worked According to Lord Robbins recollections there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950 Lecturer 1951 Reader 1954 and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 the year his Phillips Curve paper was published He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and having suffered a major stroke retired to Auckland in 1970 where he died five years later aged 60 mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons IMAGELIBRARY 244 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925743897/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925743897/ James Waters alias Joseph Turnbull, arrested for housebreaking Name James Waters alias Joseph Turnbull Arrested for not given Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 25 September 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 95 James Waters AKA Joseph Turnbull The Shields Daily News for 25 September 1906 reports HOUSEBREAKING AT NORTH SHIELDS ACCUSED COMMITTED FOR TRIAL At North Shields Police Court today James Turnbull alias Waters a young man was charged with breaking and entering the dwelling house no 2 Camp Terrace and stealing a silver serviette ring a lady s silver watch a silver spoon a ring bracelet and locket the property of Eliz Jackson Richard Appleby Jackson an articled clerk and estate agent residing at no 2 Camp Terrace said that on the 29th Aug last he and the other members of the family left home and returned on the 12th Sept finding that it had been broken into and that a number of articles valued at 4 8s had been stolen On the 20th inst from what he was told he went to the police station and there identified a serviette ring a watch a spoon and other articles as the property of his mother Anna Ramsey residing in Howard Street said that while the prosecutrix was from home she kept the keys of the house On the 4th Sept she went there for the purpose of watering the plants and found everything in order She locked the house up before she left everything then being secure She returned three days later and found the house in a state of disorder Mary Isabel Davies a cook in the employ of the prosecutrix said that while her mistress was away she went to live in Bedford Street On the 6th Sept she obtained the keys from the last witness in order to do some cleaning She went next day and was unable to open the front door because the chain on the inside had been put on and she was obliged to get assistance in order to force an entrance When she went into the house everything was in a state of disorder and she immediately informed the police Michael D Hart dealer in second hand goods 120 Pilgrim Street Newcastle stated that on the 7th inst the prisoner came to his shop and offered to sell the locket bracelet and ring produced which he said belonged to his wife and upon which he wished to raise some money that he was out of employment Witness gave 5s for them Accused also offered to sell a silver serviette ring a spoon and a brooch which witness declined to buy A watchmaker and jeweller belonging to West Hartlepool said that on Sept 8th the prisoner came to his shop and offered the serviette ring photo frame and spoon for sale saying he was hard up Witness bought the articles for 4s Later in the day he returned with a lady s silver watch and offered to dispose of it for 10s It was however defective and he accordingly declined to buy it Detective Radcliffe deposed to visiting the house in Camp Terrace on the 7th inst and finding the house in a state of disorder The door leading from the front to the back of the house was fastened and he had to climb through the serving aperture in order to get to the kitchen Detective Inspector Thornton said that on the 14th inst he went to West Hartlepool Police Station where the serviette ring spoon photo frame and watch were handed to him in the presence of the accused who said they were the things he got from a house in North Shields Witness told him there was a ring a locket and bracelet missing from the same house Prisoner replied that he sold them to a second hand dealer in Pilgrim Street Newcastle On being charged this morning the prisoner made no reply Formally charged by the Clerk Col R F Kidd prisoner had still nothing to say He was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions At the Northumberland Quarter Sessions The Shields Daily News for 19th October 1906 reports PENAL SERVITUDE FOR HOUSEBREAKING AT TYNEMOUTH James Turnbull 26 pleaded guilty to having broken into the dwelling house of Elizabeth Jackson at Tynemouth and stolen several articles to the value of 4 8s He was sentenced to five years penal servitude the sentence to run concurrently with a term he is at present serving at Durham These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/24166932850/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/24166932850/ Kingsley Bryce Speakman Smellie, c1950s LSE Professor of Political Science 1949 1965 Extracts from Professor K B S Smellie by C M R in The LSE Magazine June 1988 No75 p 21 Professor K B S Smellie Professor Emeritus of Political Science died in London on 30 November 1987 Only three days earlier a notice had appeared in The Times expressing his appreciation for the cards and flowers sent to him for his ninetieth birthday and his regret that because he was in hospital he could not celebrate with his friends in the normal champagne manner For K B as he was affectionately known such celebrations to mark the passing years had over the last decades become very much part of the currency of life This was not only because he rejoiced in the birthdays and anniversaries themselves but because they gave the opportunity for family and friends to come together at his home in Wimbledon to be generously entertained drawn into stimulating conversation on whatever intellectual problem was currently in the forefront of his mind and delighted by the humour felicity and incisiveness with which he would reply to the toast for the occasion More often than not the toast would be proposed by a former student of his who subsequently became a colleague and a friend For K B the three categories were largely indistinguishable and the resulting loyalties and affections were two way and lasting Kingsley Bryce Speakman Smellie was born in London on 22 November 1897 of Scottish parents who were on the stage He was educated first at a Dame School in Hammersmith and then at Latymer Upper School After the First World War he went up to St John s College Cambridge on a scholarship and obtained a First in both parts of the History Tripos In 1925 he went to Harvard Law School for a year on a Laura Spelman Rockefeller studentship and acquired the abiding fascination with the institutions of the American democracy which he always retained That year apart Smellie s whole academic career was spent on the staff of the Government Department of the School He had become a public administration assistant to Graham Wallas the first Professor of Political Science in 1921 a Lecturer in Public Administration in 1929 and a reader in Political Science in 1939 and was appointed to a personal chair in Political Science in January 1949 This he held until he reached retirement age in 1965 when he became Emeritus Twelve years later the School happily made him an Honorary Fellow He published nine books between 1928 and 1962 but it was orally perhaps more than in his writings that Smellie excelled and exercised a profound influence on generations of students The style was one of scepticism paradox aphorism of delight in ideas and intellectual provocation of much knowledge combined with an element of self depreciation and of infectious enthusiasm and wit Few who had the experience of lectures by or tutorials with K B thumbs tucked into his characteristic fawn waistcoat surmounted by an elegant French bow tie eyes twinkling and intellectual argument flowing will forget those happy experiences or what they learnt and derived from them In the sphere of public administration Smellie drew fruitfully on the practical knowledge he gained during the Second World War when he served first in the BBC s Propaganda Research Unit July to December 1940 and then as a temporary administrative civil servant from December 1940 to April 1942 in the Ministry of Home Security bomb recording work and then till January 1945 in the Board of Trade clothes rationing Before and after his temporary service Smellie was among those who lectured in Cambridge where the School was evacuated There were two other profound influences in K B s life The first was his marriage in 1931 to Stephanie Narlian one of his former students This was a happy and successful partnership in which in their qualities their activities and interests they complemented each other superbly The other influence was notable for what it did not do K B served as a Private in the London Scottish in France in the First World War and in April 1917 an exploding shell necessitated the amputation of his left leg below the knee and of his right foot For all the seventy years that followed he had two wooden prostheses But never once did he allow this to interfere with a full life which included playing table tennis driving a car in a manner which became somewhat notorious and a propensity for many years to consider attendance at West End cinemas to see the latest films as an extension of the facilities of the School IMAGELIBRARY 619 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/4088517369/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/4088517369/ Joseph Tombling, arrested for obtaining money by false pretences Name Joseph Tombling Arrested for Larceny Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 4 February 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 63 Joseph Tombling The Shields Daily News for 10 February 1905 reports SERIOUS CHARGES AGAINST A NORTH SHIELDS YOUTH COLLECTING FOR A BOGUS CRICKET CLUB THREE MONTHS IMPRISONMENT At North Shields Police Court today Joseph Tomblin 17 was charged with having obtained by means of false pretences 2s 6d from Henry Dillon Irvin on the 1st inst with intent to cheat and defraud Prosecutor who resides at 9 Prudhoe Terrace Tynemouth said that on the 1st inst the prisoner came to his house and at his request was turned away Subsequently the accused met him in the street and asked him for a subscription towards the Tynemouth Boys Cricket Club He asked him to accompany him to his rooms Accused did so and there he put certain questions to him Prisoner produced a subscription list and said the club had made arrangements with the North Shields Athletic Association Football Club for the rental of their field On this representation he gave him 2s 6d and finding afterwards from inquiries that his statements were incorrect he applied for a warrant for his arrest He produced the list which bore his and several other names Septimus Crowell 39 Jackson Street who is secretary of the North Shields Athletic Club said he had never heard of such as club as the Tynemouth Boys Cricket Club Detective Sergt Scougal said he arrested the accused in Front Street Tynemouth on the night of the 3rd inst and charged him He made no reply He took him to the Tynemouth Divisional Police Station and upon searching him he found in his possession several lists produced In conversation the accused said he had collected the money shewn on the lists upon his own account There was no such club as the Tynemouth Boys Cricket Club An organization bearing this name did exist about five years ago but he was not a member of it On one of the lists appeared the name of A B Brown who was supposed to be the captain of the club Witness asked him who this person was and he replied that he did not know Some of the lists were dated three or four years back During that period the accused had been collecting money for a football club at one part of the year and for a cricket club at another Accused was formally charged He pleaded guilty and had nothing to say Prisoner was then charged with having obtained by means of false pretences 9d from Henry Jarvis Ward in the latter part of January Prosecutor who lives at No Albury Park Road said the accused came to his house in the latter part of January and told him that arrangements had been made for the renting of a field for the club and that all the money had been subscribed with the exception of 2s 6d Accused had been coming to him twice a year for at least for years collecting subscriptions for a football and a cricket club Detective Sergt Scougal proved the arrest and prisoner pleaded guilty A third charge was preferred against the accused of having obtained by similar means 5s from Coun Geo Stephenson steam trawler owner No 1 Park Crescent Accused said he only got 2s 6d The father of the accused was asked by the magistrates if he could account for his son s misconduct He blamed a certain religious body in Tynemouth the officials of which sent boys to collect subscriptions They did not give them officially signed papers or collecting books and this created a great temptation The Chairman Capt J Bolt said it was a very bad case The Bench however had decided to deal leniently with the accused He would have to go to prison in the second division for one month on each charge three months in all The Shields Daily News for 1 September 1905 reports ASSAULTS AT NORTH SHIELDS YOUNG MAN FINED At the North Shields Police Court today Joseph Tombling a young man residing at 25 Edith Street Spital Dene was summoned for having assaulted Mrs Jane Mitchell who resides in the same thoroughfare and her daughter Jane Mitchell on the 25th ult Mr A Whitehorn who appeared on behalf of the complainants said they were mother and daughter They resided at 47 Edith Street Spital Dene whilst the defendant lived at No 25 in the same street On Thursday afternoon last Mrs Mitchell was wheeling a pram past the defendant s mother s door when a brother of the defendant jeered at her She took no notice of him but next day seeing him in the back lane she remonstrated with him about jeering at her At this time the defendant came upon the scene and rolling up his sleeves offered to fight anyone in Mitchell s house Mrs Mitchell advised him to go away and to frighten him said she would throw some water over him She put the pail underneath the tap and let the water run but before it was half full the defendant ran into the yard took hold of her by the throat and knocked her head against the wall Mr Whitehorn described the attack as a most outrageous one and asked the Bench to deal severely with the defendant The daughter of Mrs Mitchell called the defendant a coward for striking a woman whereupon the defendant struck her a violent blow on the side of the face Complainants bore out this testimony Defendant alleged that Mrs and Miss Mitchell made a practice of reminding him of the time he was in gaol and telling him he would be there again He denied assaulting either of the complainants and called his brother who gave evidence on his behalf A fine of 5s and costs was imposed in each case with the alternative of 14 days imprisonment These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/20868185439/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/20868185439/ 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4 42J or 2 66J or 1 044J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering It provides a first course in thermo sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology Throughout the course the fundamentals important to energy ventilation air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced Two design projects play a major part in this class They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem relating to energy consumption in buildings The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ 4 42J or 2 66J or 1 044J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering It provides a first course in thermo sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology Throughout the course the fundamentals important to energy ventilation air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced Two design projects play a major part in this class They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem relating to energy consumption in buildings The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/67288 http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/67288 Morris Ginsberg , c1930s Morris Ginsberg third from left possibly with students Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 86 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3926497812/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3926497812/ 6.832 Underactuated Robotics (MIT) 6.832 Underactuated Robotics (MIT) Includes audio video content AV lectures Robots today move far too conservatively using control systems that attempt to maintain full control authority at all times Humans and animals move much more aggressively by routinely executing motions which involve a loss of instantaneous control authority Controlling nonlinear systems without complete control authority requires methods that can reason about and exploit the natural dynamics of our machines This course discusses nonlinear dynamics and control of underactuated mechanical systems with an emphasis on machine learning methods Topics include nonlinear dynamics of passive robots walkers swimmers flyers motion planning partial feedback linearization energy shaping control analytical optimal control reinforcement learning a Includes audio video content AV lectures Robots today move far too conservatively using control systems that attempt to maintain full control authority at all times Humans and animals move much more aggressively by routinely executing motions which involve a loss of instantaneous control authority Controlling nonlinear systems without complete control authority requires methods that can reason about and exploit the natural dynamics of our machines This course discusses nonlinear dynamics and control of underactuated mechanical systems with an emphasis on machine learning methods Topics include nonlinear dynamics of passive robots walkers swimmers flyers motion planning partial feedback linearization energy shaping control analytical optimal control reinforcement learning a http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-832-underactuated-robotics-spring-2009 http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-832-underactuated-robotics-spring-2009 Morris Ginsberg c1930s Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure Reference IMAGELIBRARY 4 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3833724730/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3833724730/ William Morrissey alias Smith, arrested for sleeping rough Name William Morrissey alias Smith Arrested for Sleeping Out Arrested at North Shields Police Station Arrested on 11 July 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref DX1388 1 53 William Morrisey AKA Smith The Shields Daily Gazette for 11 July 1904 reported At North Shields Charles Winlow 53 tramp no fixed abode was charge with lodging in a hay stack in Mariners Lane without having visible means of subsistence and was sent to prison for seven days William Wadham Tyne Dock William Smith or Morrison shoeblack and William Patton no fixed abode were charged with lodging in a hay pike at Kenners Dene Farm Wadham and Smith were each committed for seven days and Patton was committed for 14 days For a mugshot of William Wadham see www flickr com photos twm news 15870103783 in set 7215762 The Shields Daily Gazette for 7 June 1904 reports Two youths named Joseph Leach 52 Wilson Street and William Morrisey no fixed abode were found by PC Twiddy were found sleeping in a railway carriage on the N E R siding in Garden Lane at 3 15 this morning Relating the facts to the South Shields magistrates the officer said that when he roused Leach that defendant set himself in a fighting attitude while the other sat up on the seat lit a cigarette and refused to leave The magistrates fined them 5s and costs each Contemporary attitudes to rough sleeping can be seen in a report in the Shields Daily Gazette on 5 October 1903 At Jarrow today John Smith Wm Cooper James Bell young men who said they came to the town in search of work were charged with sleeping in Palmers Works last night PC Lowery gave evidence and Supt Fleming said that the county was swarming with fellows like defendants who should be made to seek shelter in the Workhouses Defendants were sent to prison for 7 days The Shields Daily Gazette of 8 October 1903 contains an article entitled Lazy Loafers There are some people who will neither work nor want They are the typical loafers we can see in the streets any day Apparently we have a fairly good stock of them at North Shields It is not because of depression of trade either The other morning no fewer than half a dozen of such individuals were place in the dock on a charge of sleeping out The officer had found them all huddled together in an empty room during the night and they could not give a satisfactory account of themselves When questioned by the magistrates the police officers stated that all the defendants were lazy loafers who had never worked for a considerable time They did nothing but lounge about the streets during the day and then obtained shelter in some empty room or outhouse at night The magistrates marked their sense of the offence by sending them all to prison for a month each each with hard labour A month of hard work will probably do them a vast of good and will enable them to shake off that habitual tired feeling Morrisey was convicted on numerous other occasions The Shields Daily Gazette of 5 November 1902 reported At South Shields today a youth named William Morrisey was charged with stealing on the 4th inst a jacket of the value of 2s 3d the property of James Davison He was fined 10s and costs The Shields Daily Gazette for 2 January 1903 reported Before the Mayor Counc James Grant and other magistrates at So Shields on Wednesday William Morrisey 16 and Arthur Cairns 18 were charged with stealing on Dec 29th a barometer valued at 25s on the way to the Police Station Morrisey remarked A couple of months would just about put me right The Bench fined Morrisey who had previously convicted for larceny 10s and costs and Cairns 5s and costs The Shields Daily News for 10 July 1905 reported At South Shields Police Court today William Morrisey 20 no fixed abode and David McNess 19 Anderson s Lane were charged with breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary McCalvery on the 8th inst and stealing therein two desks value 10s Prosecutrix said she kept a green grocer s shop in Tyne Street and resided upon the premises At half past twelve on the afternoon of the 8th inst she locked up her house and shop leaving two desks which contained some valuables on a desk bed in the kitchen When she returned to her house at twenty past ten at night she found that someone had been in the house and that the desks had been removed from the desk bed on to the floor near the door A witness deposed to seeing the prisoners loitering near the prosecutrix s shop She afterwards saw Morrisey open the house door with a key and go in She then informed the police PC Ogg said from what he was told he visited the prosecutrix s house and on going inside he found Morrisey in the kitchen He took him into custody He afterwards apprehended McNess The prisoner had nothing to say This was Morrisey s 18th offence and he was committed to prison for 3 months this being McNess s 1st offence he was bound over for three months These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne Wear Archives TWA ref DX1388 1 This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21 This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16296238087/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/16296238087/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 429 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337857/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337857/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 431 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337763/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337763/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 428 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093144/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093144/ 21G.108 Chinese II (Streamlined) (MIT) 21G.108 Chinese II (Streamlined) (MIT) This course along with 21G 107 157 Chinese I Streamlined offered in the previous fall form the elementary level of the streamlined sequence which is intended for students who when they began the sequence at beginning level had basic conversational skills gained typically from growing up in a Chinese speaking environment but lacked a corresponding level of literacy The focus of the course is on standard usage on reading in both traditional and simplified characters and on writing The course is conducted entirely in Chinese Streamlined I and II each section is limited to 16 students for pedagogical purposes Pre registered students have priority Continuing students get first priority followed in order by students in 21G 076 declared concentrators and minors so This course along with 21G 107 157 Chinese I Streamlined offered in the previous fall form the elementary level of the streamlined sequence which is intended for students who when they began the sequence at beginning level had basic conversational skills gained typically from growing up in a Chinese speaking environment but lacked a corresponding level of literacy The focus of the course is on standard usage on reading in both traditional and simplified characters and on writing The course is conducted entirely in Chinese Streamlined I and II each section is limited to 16 students for pedagogical purposes Pre registered students have priority Continuing students get first priority followed in order by students in 21G 076 declared concentrators and minors so http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/global-studies-and-languages/21g-108-chinese-ii-streamlined-spring-2015 http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/global-studies-and-languages/21g-108-chinese-ii-streamlined-spring-2015 Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 427 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093086/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3990093086/ Morris Ginsberg and LSE Students at Grove Lodge, Cambridge, June 1940 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 426 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337633/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3989337633/ 1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT) 1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT) This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology The design and development of component based software using C and NET is covered data structures and algorithms for modeling analysis and visualization basic problem solving techniques web services and the management and maintenance of software Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms and numerical simulation techniques Foundation for in depth exploration of image processing computational geometry finite element methods network methods and e business applications This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M Eng program This class was also offered in Course 13 Department of Ocean Engineering as 13 470J This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology The design and development of component based software using C and NET is covered data structures and algorithms for modeling analysis and visualization basic problem solving techniques web services and the management and maintenance of software Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms and numerical simulation techniques Foundation for in depth exploration of image processing computational geometry finite element methods network methods and e business applications This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M Eng program This class was also offered in Course 13 Department of Ocean Engineering as 13 470J http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/civil-and-environmental-engineering/1-124j-foundations-of-software-engineering-fall-2000 http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/civil-and-environmental-engineering/1-124j-foundations-of-software-engineering-fall-2000 Morris Ginsberg , c1923 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 87 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712753/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712753/ Morris Ginsberg , c1930 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 85 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712659/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712659/ Morris Ginsberg , c1930 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 84 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3926497694/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3926497694/ Morris Ginsberg , c1918 Photo given to LSE by Ginsberg s former neighbour Evelyn Osterweil Morris Ginsberg An Obituary LSE Magazine December 1970 No 40 by Donald G MacRae The death of Morris Ginsberg at the age of 81 does much more than sever a link with LSE going back in one form or another to 1911 Although physically frail in his latter years his mind was as powerful as clear as interested and as sceptical as ever down until the time of his death an he was busily engaged in the planning of a new volume of essays For long he has been the greatest British sociologist During many years he had carried the burden of sociology in this country almost alone What the subject has of rigour order clarity scholarship creative doubt and humane concern in 1970 is the legacy above all of Ginsberg He was born in 1899 in one of the smaller communities of the Russian Empire Coming to England as a lad he was fired by a faith in this country largely through reading a Hebrew translation of George Eliot s Daniel Deronda he always insisted that George Eliot read better in Hebrew a thought that might have pleased that author He performed brilliantly in philosophy at University College London and became an authority on Melebranche he published a translation of the Entretiens of 1688 in 1923 British critical realism attracted him and dominated the philosophical concerns that continued through his life By 1911 he was drawn to LSE by Hobhouse and the new liberal sociology of Westermarck The Manchester Guardian circle of these years deeply influenced his political outlook In 1915 along with Hobhouse and Wheeler he published what is still a classic of comparative and statistical sociology The Material Culture and Social Institutions of the Simpler Peoples Those who think of him as an essentially non quantitative sociology should also remember his remarkable pioneering work of the 1920 s on social mobility After war service he was a sergeant engaged on the dangerous business of bringing ammunition laden mule teams up to the line on the Western Front he returned to academic life in London moving from University College the Fellowship of which was one of his most prized honours fully to LSE where in due course and one would think inevitably became the Martin White Professor of Sociology in succession to Hobhouse in 1929 He held this chair until 1954 but taught actively at the school even after retirement During these years he did important work in social psychology and in 1934 published his Sociology which in its brief compass its learning in the European tradition of the subject its succinct force remains a classic The crises of the 30 s actively involved him in the tasks of rescue and re settlement of refugee scholars When the School was evacuated to Cambridge during the second German war he carried with a success that was to leave him exhausted in 1945 an almost incredible range and burden of teaching Yet on return to London he re established and extended the LSE Department on the shoulders of which then rested the total responsibility for the development of sociology in Britain In all this the support and happiness of his marriage to Ethel Street made his tasks possible Her long and tragic illness and death was to cloud his old age His capacity for friendship for kindness and concern was great and discriminating He was shy and reserved even bleak in manner yet he was at heart warm and eminently practical He did not fuss so people under estimated his human scholarly and administrative achievements With difficulty I persuaded him to publish the three volumes of his Essays in Sociology and Social Philosophy 1956 61 Their success delighted him Their importance is not exhausted spare in style always clear to many people they have seemed essentially critical and exegetical But this is not the case Too scrupulous in his debt to Hobhouse and Westermarck he concealed his own originality and wealth of analysis He made much dangerous nonsense henceforth impossible He greatly advanced a comparative and institutional sociology at once creative and highly disciplined His concern with the quality of social life and his sense of rigour made him in my judgement almost the only social philosopher of our age The influence of his teaching he was an almost perfect if austere lecturer has been international His rationalism his short term pessimism and longer term hope annoyed the passionate and impatient Yet they gained from his wise stoicism and deep concern His humour was private and not always kind but it was without malice How he reflected could Malinowski have found more to say about the Trobriands than Gibbon on the fall of Rome His loyalty to those he loved never faltered There is so much that one has no room to say here about him suffice it to establish that he was one of those who made his subject out of stubborn fact and complexity made the LSE both unique and great among institutions of higher learning and who helped his friends and students to endure IMAGELIBRARY 83 Persistent URL archives lse ac uk dserve exe dsqServer lib 4 lse ac uk a https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712529/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lselibrary/3925712529/ Patterns of life Patterns of life Each set of files is organised into topics which are set out in two ways For linear learners they are set out in a suggested order For non linear learners they are organised via an interactive mind map which is a diagram showing how the different sub topics fit together into the main topic A printable version of the mind map is also made available All this is done within WebCT Learners were told to go through the files in place of traditional lectures This allowed them to go through the material in their own time and in an order determined by them It enabled portability learners could if they wished download the mp3 files transcripts and or the visual aids and study them at any time and in any place they chose The learners were also asked to read one or more jou Each set of files is organised into topics which are set out in two ways For linear learners they are set out in a suggested order For non linear learners they are organised via an interactive mind map which is a diagram showing how the different sub topics fit together into the main topic A printable version of the mind map is also made available All this is done within WebCT Learners were told to go through the files in place of traditional lectures This allowed them to go through the material in their own time and in an order determined by them It enabled portability learners could if they wished download the mp3 files transcripts and or the visual aids and study them at any time and in any place they chose The learners were also asked to read one or more jou Each mp3 voice recording accompanies a PowerPoint slide or set of slides These two files were bundled together with a transcript of the mp3s mainly for people with hearing disabilities and a printer friendly pdf of the slides Each set of files is organised into topics which are set out in two ways For linear learners they are set out in a suggested order For non linear learners they are organised via an interactive mind map which is a diagram showing how the different sub topics fit together into the main topic A printable version of the mind map is also made available All this is done within WebCT Learners were told to go through the files in place of traditional lectures This allowed them to go through the material in their own time and in an order determined Each mp3 voice recording accompanies a PowerPoint slide or set of slides These two files were bundled together with a transcript of the mp3s mainly for people with hearing disabilities and a printer friendly pdf of the slides Each set of files is organised into topics which are set out in two ways For linear learners they are set out in a suggested order For non linear learners they are organised via an interactive mind map which is a diagram showing how the different sub topics fit together into the main topic A printable version of the mind map is also made available All this is done within WebCT Learners were told to go through the files in place of traditional lectures This allowed them to go through the material in their own time and in an order determined http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/resources/resource.aspx?hid=11c7f1e4-e7c8-33a8-3fa5-dbccc03f458e http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/resources/resource.aspx?hid=11c7f1e4-e7c8-33a8-3fa5-dbccc03f458e Side Tank Engine 'Pyramus' built in Newcastle upon Tyne An image of the side tank engine Pyramus one of two ordered for the Shropshire and Montgomeryshire Light Railway in February 1911 TWAM ref DS RSH 1 1 3 Engine nos 2878 2879 Built for Shropshire and Montgomeryshire Light Railway Date ordered 13 February 1911 Gauge of Railway 4 feet 8 inches Principal Dimensions Cylinders dia 14 inches Cylinders stroke 22 inches Wheels Dia of coupled 3 feet 6 inches Wheel base total 15 feet 6 inches Water capacity 1200 gallons Fuel capacity 80 cubic feet 1 75 tons Heating surface total 723 5 square feet Grate area 11 3 square feet Working pressure 170 lbs per square inch Total weight in working order 37 tons Tractive force taking 90 of the working pressure 15708 lbs Tractive force taking 75 of the working pressure 13090 lbs Approximate shipping space 2679 cubic feet Approximate gross weight packed for shipment 30 75 tons Code Word PYRAMUS This album celebrates the achievements of the Hawthorn Leslie locomotive works at Forth Banks Newcastle upon Tyne The works were established by Robert Hawthorn in January 1817 and in 1820 his brother William Hawthorn joined him as a partner The firm initially manufactured stationary engines but within a few years diversified into marine engineering and in 1831 produced its first locomotive engine for the Stockton and Darlington Railway In 1870 the firm established a separate marine engine works on the River Tyne at St Peter s and from 1882 the Forth Banks Works became devoted entirely to the manufacture of locomotives In 1885 the firm amalgamated with the shipyard of Andrew Leslie at Hebburn creating the world famous shipbuilding and engineering company R and W Hawthorn Leslie Co Ltd The Forth Banks Works of Hawthorn Leslie produced engines of all types and sizes for railways around the world The output of the Forth Banks Works included a large number of tank engines for industrial works and collieries and the firm established a speciality in the construction of crane locomotives The images in this set date from the early twentieth century and are a reminder of Newcastle upon Tyne s proud industrial heritage They are taken from a series of photograph albums produced by Hawthorn Leslie The albums were kindly donated to Tyne Wear Archives by Alan C Baker and T D Allen Civil Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/25034121519/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/25034121519/ Tank engine 'Burra' ready for shipment to Australia An image of the tank engine Burra ordered in May 1923 by Austral Engineering Supply Company Sydney Australia TWAM ref DS RSH 1 1 4 Engine nos 3574 Built for Austral Engineering Supply Company Sydney Australia Date ordered 17 May 1923 Gauge of Railway 2 feet Principal Dimensions Cylinders dia 8 inches Cylinders stroke 12 inches Wheels Dia of coupled 2 feet Wheel base total 4 feet Water capacity 140 gallons Fuel capacity 10 cubic feet 0 23 tons Heating surface total 136 4 square feet Grate area 2 95 square feet Working pressure 160 lbs per square inch Total weight in working order 7 46 tons Tractive force taking 90 of the working pressure 4608 lbs Tractive force taking 75 of the working pressure 3840 lbs Approximate shipping space 614 cubic feet Approximate gross weight packed for shipment 6 875 tons Code Word BURRA This album celebrates the achievements of the Hawthorn Leslie locomotive works at Forth Banks Newcastle upon Tyne The works were established by Robert Hawthorn in January 1817 and in 1820 his brother William Hawthorn joined him as a partner The firm initially manufactured stationary engines but within a few years diversified into marine engineering and in 1831 produced its first locomotive engine for the Stockton and Darlington Railway In 1870 the firm established a separate marine engine works on the River Tyne at St Peter s and from 1882 the Forth Banks Works became devoted entirely to the manufacture of locomotives In 1885 the firm amalgamated with the shipyard of Andrew Leslie at Hebburn creating the world famous shipbuilding and engineering company R and W Hawthorn Leslie Co Ltd The Forth Banks Works of Hawthorn Leslie produced engines of all types and sizes for railways around the world The output of the Forth Banks Works included a large number of tank engines for industrial works and collieries and the firm established a speciality in the construction of crane locomotives The images in this set date from the early twentieth century and are a reminder of Newcastle upon Tyne s proud industrial heritage They are taken from a series of photograph albums produced by Hawthorn Leslie The albums were kindly donated to Tyne Wear Archives by Alan C Baker and T D Allen Civil Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/26673070155/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/26673070155/ 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) This is the 20th anniversary of the Beijing Urban Design Studio which is a joint program between the MIT and Tsinghua University Schools of Architecture and Planning The goal of the studio is to foster international cooperation through the undertaking of a joint urban design and planning initiative in the city of Beijing involving important often controversial sites and projects Since 1995 almost 250 MIT and Tsinghua University students and faculty have participated in this annual studio making it one of the most successful and enduring international academic programs between China and the U S It has received the Irwin Sizer Award from MIT for outstanding innovation in education The studio takes place over five weeks in June and July including several weeks in residence at Tsinghu This is the 20th anniversary of the Beijing Urban Design Studio which is a joint program between the MIT and Tsinghua University Schools of Architecture and Planning The goal of the studio is to foster international cooperation through the undertaking of a joint urban design and planning initiative in the city of Beijing involving important often controversial sites and projects Since 1995 almost 250 MIT and Tsinghua University students and faculty have participated in this annual studio making it one of the most successful and enduring international academic programs between China and the U S It has received the Irwin Sizer Award from MIT for outstanding innovation in education The studio takes place over five weeks in June and July including several weeks in residence at Tsinghu http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/urban-studies-and-planning/11-307-beijing-urban-design-studio-summer-2006 http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/urban-studies-and-planning/11-307-beijing-urban-design-studio-summer-2006 Improving the health of the population and evidence based medicine Improving the health of the population and evidence based medicine Dr Puja Myles is an Associate Professor of Health Protection and Epidemiology at the University of Nottingham She trained as a dentist at Panjab University India and worked as a dentist in India before completing her specialist training in Public Health in the East Midlands She completed a doctorate in Epidemiology at the University of Nottingham She is currently part of the Health Protection Research Group at Nottingham and her research is primarily in respiratory disease epidemiology She is also interested in evaluation methods and is currently involved in some public health service evaluations Dr Puja Myles is an Associate Professor of Health Protection and Epidemiology at the University of Nottingham She trained as a dentist at Panjab University India and worked as a dentist in India before completing her specialist training in Public Health in the East Midlands She completed a doctorate in Epidemiology at the University of Nottingham She is currently part of the Health Protection Research Group at Nottingham and her research is primarily in respiratory disease epidemiology She is also interested in evaluation methods and is currently involved in some public health service evaluations This is a module framework It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file As taught in Autumn Semester 2009 This module has two essential components Evidence Based Medicine and Public Health Evidence Based Medicine was introduced as a new discipline because traditionally the teaching of medicine was heavily reliant on an apprenticeship type system with emphasis on learning from observing one s teachers One of the guiding principles in the NHS today is that all health care should be based on research evidence One of the aims of this module is to cover core concepts in epidemiology and basic statistics so that you are able to understand the evidence presented in research papers and apply it to your clinical practice The Public Health component of this module will provide you This is a module framework It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file As taught in Autumn Semester 2009 This module has two essential components Evidence Based Medicine and Public Health Evidence Based Medicine was introduced as a new discipline because traditionally the teaching of medicine was heavily reliant on an apprenticeship type system with emphasis on learning from observing one s teachers One of the guiding principles in the NHS today is that all health care should be based on research evidence One of the aims of this module is to cover core concepts in epidemiology and basic statistics so that you are able to understand the evidence presented in research papers and apply it to your clinical practice The Public Health component of this module will provide you http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/resources/resource.aspx?hid=f14ed503-63ad-e229-11f7-12369406f5a8 http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/resources/resource.aspx?hid=f14ed503-63ad-e229-11f7-12369406f5a8 Locomotive for the Indian Iron & Steel Company An image of one of two locomotives ordered by the Indian Iron Steel Company in 1923 TWAM ref DS RSH 1 1 4 Engine nos 3561 3562 Built for Indian Iron Steel Company Ltd Date ordered 16 February 1923 Gauge of Railway 5 feet 6 inches Principal Dimensions Cylinders dia 17 inches Cylinders stroke 24 inches Wheels Dia of coupled 3 feet 10 inches Wheel base total 11 feet 6 inches Water capacity 1100 gallons Fuel capacity 86 cubic feet 2 tons Heating surface total 935 square feet Grate area 15 5 square feet Working pressure 180 lbs per square inch Total weight in working order 47 15 tons Tractive force taking 90 of the working pressure 24426 lbs Tractive force taking 75 of the working pressure 20355 lbs Approximate shipping space 3437 cubic feet Approximate gross weight packed for shipment 41 118 tons Code Word INDIAN This album celebrates the achievements of the Hawthorn Leslie locomotive works at Forth Banks Newcastle upon Tyne The works were established by Robert Hawthorn in January 1817 and in 1820 his brother William Hawthorn joined him as a partner The firm initially manufactured stationary engines but within a few years diversified into marine engineering and in 1831 produced its first locomotive engine for the Stockton and Darlington Railway In 1870 the firm established a separate marine engine works on the River Tyne at St Peter s and from 1882 the Forth Banks Works became devoted entirely to the manufacture of locomotives In 1885 the firm amalgamated with the shipyard of Andrew Leslie at Hebburn creating the world famous shipbuilding and engineering company R and W Hawthorn Leslie Co Ltd The Forth Banks Works of Hawthorn Leslie produced engines of all types and sizes for railways around the world The output of the Forth Banks Works included a large number of tank engines for industrial works and collieries and the firm established a speciality in the construction of crane locomotives The images in this set date from the early twentieth century and are a reminder of Newcastle upon Tyne s proud industrial heritage They are taken from a series of photograph albums produced by Hawthorn Leslie The albums were kindly donated to Tyne Wear Archives by Alan C Baker and T D Allen Civil Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/26851924230/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/26851924230/ Locomotive for the Singapore Railway An image of a side tank engine ordered by the Crown Agents for the Colonies in March 1910 TWAM ref DS RSH 1 1 3 The engine seems to have been built for the Singapore Railway Engine no 2831 Built for Crown Agents for the Colonies Straits Railway Date ordered 23 March 1910 Gauge of Railway 3 feet 3 3 8 inches Principal Dimensions Cylinders dia 12 inches Cylinders stroke 18 inches Wheels Dia of coupled 3 feet 3 inches Wheel base total 17 feet 2 inches Water capacity 530 gallons Fuel capacity not given Heating surface total 507 square feet Grate area 9 5 square feet Working pressure 140 lbs per square inch Total weight in working order 24 8 tons Tractive force taking 90 of the working pressure 8373 lbs Tractive force taking 75 of the working pressure 6978 lbs Approximate shipping space 2157 cubic feet Approximate gross weight packed for shipment 24 8 tons Code Word STRAITS This album celebrates the achievements of the Hawthorn Leslie locomotive works at Forth Banks Newcastle upon Tyne The works were established by Robert Hawthorn in January 1817 and in 1820 his brother William Hawthorn joined him as a partner The firm initially manufactured stationary engines but within a few years diversified into marine engineering and in 1831 produced its first locomotive engine for the Stockton and Darlington Railway In 1870 the firm established a separate marine engine works on the River Tyne at St Peter s and from 1882 the Forth Banks Works became devoted entirely to the manufacture of locomotives In 1885 the firm amalgamated with the shipyard of Andrew Leslie at Hebburn creating the world famous shipbuilding and engineering company R and W Hawthorn Leslie Co Ltd The Forth Banks Works of Hawthorn Leslie produced engines of all types and sizes for railways around the world The output of the Forth Banks Works included a large number of tank engines for industrial works and collieries and the firm established a speciality in the construction of crane locomotives The images in this set date from the early twentieth century and are a reminder of Newcastle upon Tyne s proud industrial heritage They are taken from a series of photograph albums produced by Hawthorn Leslie The albums were kindly donated to Tyne Wear Archives by Alan C Baker and T D Allen Civil Copyright We re happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons Please cite Tyne Wear Archives Museums when reusing Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though if you re unsure please email archives twmuseums org uk https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/25234894313/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/25234894313/ 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering (MIT) 5.95J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering (MIT) This participatory seminar focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching science and engineering in higher education This course is designed for graduate students interested in an academic career and anyone else interested in teaching Topics include theories of adult learning course development promoting active learning problem solving and critical thinking in students communicating with a diverse student body using educational technology to further learning lecturing creating effective tests and assignments and assessment and evaluation Students research and present a relevant topic of particular interest The subject is appropriate for both novices and those with teaching experience This participatory seminar focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching science and engineering in higher education This course is designed for graduate students interested in an academic career and anyone else interested in teaching Topics include theories of adult learning course development promoting active learning problem solving and critical thinking in students communicating with a diverse student body using educational technology to further learning lecturing creating effective tests and assignments and assessment and evaluation Students research and present a relevant topic of particular interest The subject is appropriate for both novices and those with teaching experience http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/chemistry/5-95j-teaching-college-level-science-and-engineering-fall-2012 http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/chemistry/5-95j-teaching-college-level-science-and-engineering-fall-2012