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8.333 Statistical Mechanics (MIT) 8.333 Statistical Mechanics (MIT)

Description

8.333 is the first course in a two-semester sequence on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.333: the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Postulates of classical statistical mechanics, micro canonical, canonical, and grand canonical distributions; applications to lattice vibrations, ideal gas, photon gas. Quantum statistical mechanics; Fermi and Bose systems. Interacting systems: cluster expansions, van der Waal's gas, and mean-field theory. 8.333 is the first course in a two-semester sequence on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.333: the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Postulates of classical statistical mechanics, micro canonical, canonical, and grand canonical distributions; applications to lattice vibrations, ideal gas, photon gas. Quantum statistical mechanics; Fermi and Bose systems. Interacting systems: cluster expansions, van der Waal's gas, and mean-field theory.

Subjects

hermodynamics | hermodynamics | entropy | entropy | mehanics | mehanics | microcanonical distributions | microcanonical distributions | canonical distributions | canonical distributions | grand canonical distributions | grand canonical distributions | lattice vibrations | lattice vibrations | ideal gas | ideal gas | photon gas | photon gas | quantum statistical mechanics | quantum statistical mechanics | Fermi systems | Fermi systems | Bose systems | Bose systems | cluster expansions | cluster expansions | van der Waal's gas | van der Waal's gas | mean-field theory | mean-field theory

License

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2.011 Introduction to Ocean Science and Technology (13.00) (MIT) 2.011 Introduction to Ocean Science and Technology (13.00) (MIT)

Description

Introductory subject for students majoring or minoring in ocean engineering and others desiring introductory knowledge in the field. Physical oceanography including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density, heat balance, major ocean circulations and geostrophic flows, and influence of wind stress. Surface waves including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Acoustics in the ocean including influence of water properties on sound speed and refraction, sounds generated by ships and marine animals, fundamentals of sonar, types of sonar systems and their principles of operation.This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.00. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mec Introductory subject for students majoring or minoring in ocean engineering and others desiring introductory knowledge in the field. Physical oceanography including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density, heat balance, major ocean circulations and geostrophic flows, and influence of wind stress. Surface waves including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Acoustics in the ocean including influence of water properties on sound speed and refraction, sounds generated by ships and marine animals, fundamentals of sonar, types of sonar systems and their principles of operation.This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.00. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mec

Subjects

Physical oceanography | | Physical oceanography | | major ocean circulations | | major ocean circulations | | geostrophic flows | | geostrophic flows | | Surface waves | | Surface waves | | wave velocities | | wave velocities | | propagation phenomena | | propagation phenomena | | ocean acoustics | | ocean acoustics | | sonar | sonar

License

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18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT) 18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.

Subjects

Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite differences | finite elements | finite elements | spectral method | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | Complex variables and applications | Complex variables and applications | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | linear programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Oliver Taplin on Classics

Description

Professor Oliver Taplin, an authority on classics and the performance of ancient drama, talks about the subject and his research. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

theatre | ancient greek | drama | performance | classics | ancient roman | theatre | ancient greek | drama | performance | classics | ancient roman

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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If marriage is a trade, then what price romance?

Description

Theatre was a forum for early twentieth-century feminists to challenge romantic ideals of marriage, arguing against society blocking women's access to alternative professions. Did one playwright solve the problem of selling seats without selling out? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

play | love | theatre | prostitution | romance | s day | feminism | s day | feminism | 2011-02-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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If marriage is a trade, then what price romance?

Description

Theatre was a forum for early twentieth-century feminists to challenge romantic ideals of marriage, arguing against society blocking women's access to alternative professions. Did one playwright solve the problem of selling seats without selling out? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

play | love | theatre | prostitution | romance | s day | feminism | s day | feminism | 2011-02-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas. This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation | Japan | Japan | politics | politics | policy | policy | contemporary Japan | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | electoral politics | interest group politics | interest group politics | party politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | social policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | defense policy | defense policy | energy policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | trade policy | trade policy

License

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c. of ancient Rome. By Mr. Pope.Of false taste c. of ancient Rome. By Mr. Pope.Of false taste

Description

ebook version of An epistle to the Right Honourable Richard Earl of Burlington: Occasion'd by his publishing Palladio's designs of the baths, arches, theatres, &c. of ancient Rome. By Mr. Pope.Of false taste ebook version of An epistle to the Right Honourable Richard Earl of Burlington: Occasion'd by his publishing Palladio's designs of the baths, arches, theatres, &c. of ancient Rome. By Mr. Pope.Of false taste

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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c. The music composed by Mr. Smith. c. The music composed by Mr. Smith.

Description

ebook version of The tempest. An opera: Taken from Shakespear. As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane. The songs from Shakespeare, Dryden, &c. The music composed by Mr. Smith. ebook version of The tempest. An opera: Taken from Shakespear. As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane. The songs from Shakespeare, Dryden, &c. The music composed by Mr. Smith.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Via de Sugherari, the Theatre of Marcellus, Rome Via de Sugherari, the Theatre of Marcellus, Rome

Description

Subjects

italy | italy | rome | rome | roma | roma | italia | italia | jewish | jewish | ghetto | ghetto | oldwork | oldwork | porticodottavia | porticodottavia | ebrei | ebrei | nationalgalleriesofscotland | nationalgalleriesofscotland

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Imperial Theatre, Nicklodeon, Bleury St., Montreal, QC, 1913

Description

Subjects

canada | theatre | mccordmuseum | muséemccord

License

No known copyright restrictions

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22.033 Nuclear Systems Design Project (MIT) 22.033 Nuclear Systems Design Project (MIT)

Description

This capstone course is a group design project involving integration of nuclear physics, particle transport, control, heat transfer, safety, instrumentation, materials, environmental impact, and economic optimization. It provides opportunities to synthesize knowledge acquired in nuclear and non-nuclear subjects and apply this knowledge to practical problems of current interest in nuclear applications design. Each year, the class takes on a different design project; this year, the project is a power plant design that ties together the creation of emission-free electricity with carbon sequestration and fossil fuel displacement. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.This course is an elective subject in MIT’s undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institut This capstone course is a group design project involving integration of nuclear physics, particle transport, control, heat transfer, safety, instrumentation, materials, environmental impact, and economic optimization. It provides opportunities to synthesize knowledge acquired in nuclear and non-nuclear subjects and apply this knowledge to practical problems of current interest in nuclear applications design. Each year, the class takes on a different design project; this year, the project is a power plant design that ties together the creation of emission-free electricity with carbon sequestration and fossil fuel displacement. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.This course is an elective subject in MIT’s undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institut

Subjects

nuclear energy | nuclear energy | reactor design | reactor design | design optimization | design optimization | biofuel | biofuel | carbon sequestration | carbon sequestration

License

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21M.542 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Time (MIT) 21M.542 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Time (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video, AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of three broad topics concerning music in relation to time.Music as Architecture: the creation of musical shapes in time;Music as Memory: how musical understanding depends upon memory and reminiscence, with attention to analysis of musical structures; andTime as the Substance of Music: how different disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience view the temporal dimension of musical processes and/or performances.Classroom discussion of these topics is complemented by three weekend concerts with pre-concert forums, jointly presented by the Boston Chamber Music Society (BCMS) and MIT Music & Theater Arts. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video, AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of three broad topics concerning music in relation to time.Music as Architecture: the creation of musical shapes in time;Music as Memory: how musical understanding depends upon memory and reminiscence, with attention to analysis of musical structures; andTime as the Substance of Music: how different disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience view the temporal dimension of musical processes and/or performances.Classroom discussion of these topics is complemented by three weekend concerts with pre-concert forums, jointly presented by the Boston Chamber Music Society (BCMS) and MIT Music & Theater Arts.

Subjects

musical analysis | musical analysis | music theory | music theory | music appreciation | music appreciation | music composition | music composition | music performance | music performance | temporality | temporality | physics | physics | memory | memory | film score | film score | poetry | poetry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RES.6-006 Video Demonstrations in Lasers and Optics (MIT) RES.6-006 Video Demonstrations in Lasers and Optics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This resource contains demonstrations used to illustrate the theory and applications of lasers and optics. A detailed listing of the topics can be found below.Lasers today are being used in an ever-increasing number of applications. In fact, there is hardly a field that has not been touched by the laser. Lasers are playing key roles in the home, office, hospital, factory, outdoors, and theater, as well as in the laboratory.To learn about lasers and related optics, one usually takes a course or two, or acquires the necessary information from books and journal articles. To make this learning more vivid and more exciting, and, one hopes, more understandable, one needs to see some of the basic phenomena involved. To fill this need, Professor Ezekiel h Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This resource contains demonstrations used to illustrate the theory and applications of lasers and optics. A detailed listing of the topics can be found below.Lasers today are being used in an ever-increasing number of applications. In fact, there is hardly a field that has not been touched by the laser. Lasers are playing key roles in the home, office, hospital, factory, outdoors, and theater, as well as in the laboratory.To learn about lasers and related optics, one usually takes a course or two, or acquires the necessary information from books and journal articles. To make this learning more vivid and more exciting, and, one hopes, more understandable, one needs to see some of the basic phenomena involved. To fill this need, Professor Ezekiel h

Subjects

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1.103 Civil Engineering Materials Laboratory (MIT) 1.103 Civil Engineering Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course introduces the concepts, techniques, and devices used to measure engineering properties of materials. There is an emphasis on measurement of load-deformation characteristics and failure modes of both natural and fabricated materials. Weekly experiments include data collection, data analysis, and interpretation and presentation of results. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course introduces the concepts, techniques, and devices used to measure engineering properties of materials. There is an emphasis on measurement of load-deformation characteristics and failure modes of both natural and fabricated materials. Weekly experiments include data collection, data analysis, and interpretation and presentation of results.

Subjects

materials laboratory | materials laboratory | load-deformation characteristics | load-deformation characteristics | failure modes | failure modes | experiments | experiments | data collection | data collection | data analysis | data analysis | tension | tension | elastic behavior | elastic behavior | direct shear | direct shear | friction | friction | concrete | concrete | early age properties | early age properties | compression | compression | directionality | directionality | soil classification | soil classification | consolidation test | consolidation test | heat treatment | heat treatment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.009 Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.009 Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. Three hundred and eighty years after his death, William Shakespeare remains the central author of the English-speaking world; he is the most quoted poet and the most regularly produced playwright — and now among the most popular screenwriters as well. Why is that, and who "is" he? Why do so many people think his writing is so great? What meanings did his plays have in his own time, and how do we read, speak, or listen to his words now? What should we watch for when viewing his plays in performance? Whose plays are we watching, anyway? We'll consider these questions as we carefully examine a sampling of Shakespeare's plays from a variety of critical perspectives. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. Three hundred and eighty years after his death, William Shakespeare remains the central author of the English-speaking world; he is the most quoted poet and the most regularly produced playwright — and now among the most popular screenwriters as well. Why is that, and who "is" he? Why do so many people think his writing is so great? What meanings did his plays have in his own time, and how do we read, speak, or listen to his words now? What should we watch for when viewing his plays in performance? Whose plays are we watching, anyway? We'll consider these questions as we carefully examine a sampling of Shakespeare's plays from a variety of critical perspectives.

Subjects

literature | literature | william shakespeare | william shakespeare | playwright | playwright | performance | performance | theater | theater | literary analysis | literary analysis | film | film | A Midsummer Night's Dream | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Much Ado about Nothing | Much Ado about Nothing | Hamlet | Hamlet | The First Part of King Henry the Fourth | The First Part of King Henry the Fourth | Henry the Fifth | Henry the Fifth | Othello | Othello | King Lear | King Lear | The Tempest | The Tempest

License

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8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT)

Description

8.01 is a first-semester freshman physics class in Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory. In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Resonance Phenomena, Musical Instruments, Stellar Collapse, Supernovae, Astronomical observations from very high flying balloons (lecture 35), and you will be allowed a peek into the intriguing Quantum World. Also by Walter Lewin Courses: Electricity and Magnetism (8.02) - with a complete set of 36 video lectures from the Spring of 2002 Vibrations and Waves (8.03) - with a complete set of 23 video lectures from the Fall of 2004 Talks: For The Love Of Physics - Profes

Subjects

units of measurement | powers of ten | dimensional analysis | measurement uncertainty | scaling arguments | velocity | speed | acceleration | acceleration of gravity | vectors | motion | vector product | scalar product | projectiles | projectile trajectory | circular motion | centripetal motion | artifical gravity | force | Newton's Three Laws | eight | weightlessness | tension | friction | frictionless forces | static friction | dot products | cross products | kinematics | springs | pendulum | mechanical energy | kinetic energy | universal gravitation | resistive force | drag force | air drag | viscous terminal velocity | potential energy | heat; energy consumption | heat | energy consumption | collisions | center of mass | momentum | Newton's Cradle | impulse and impact | rocket thrust | rocket velocity | flywheels | inertia | torque | spinning rod | elliptical orbits | Kepler's Laws | Doppler shift | stellar dynamics | sound waves | electromagnets | binary star | black holes | rope tension | elasticity | speed of sound | pressure in fluid | Pascal's Principle | hydrostatic pressure | barometric pressure | submarines | buoyant force | Bernoulli's Equations | Archimede's Principle | floating | baloons | resonance | wind instruments | thermal expansion | shrink fitting | particles and waves | diffraction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.693 Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems -- Sensors and Measurements (13.998) (MIT) 2.693 Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems -- Sensors and Measurements (13.998) (MIT)

Description

This course introduces theoretical and practical principles of design of oceanographic sensor systems. Topics include: transducer characteristics for acoustic, current, temperature, pressure, electric, magnetic, gravity, salinity, velocity, heat flow, and optical devices; limitations on these devices imposed by ocean environments; signal conditioning and recording; noise, sensitivity, and sampling limitations; and standards. Lectures by experts cover the principles of state-of-the-art systems being used in physical oceanography, geophysics, submersibles, acoustics. For lab work, day cruises in local waters allow students to prepare, deploy and analyze observations from standard oceanographic instruments. This course introduces theoretical and practical principles of design of oceanographic sensor systems. Topics include: transducer characteristics for acoustic, current, temperature, pressure, electric, magnetic, gravity, salinity, velocity, heat flow, and optical devices; limitations on these devices imposed by ocean environments; signal conditioning and recording; noise, sensitivity, and sampling limitations; and standards. Lectures by experts cover the principles of state-of-the-art systems being used in physical oceanography, geophysics, submersibles, acoustics. For lab work, day cruises in local waters allow students to prepare, deploy and analyze observations from standard oceanographic instruments.

Subjects

Oceanography | Oceanography | monitoring | monitoring | instrumentation | instrumentation | experiment | experiment | sampling | sampling | transducer | transducer | meteorology | meteorology | calibration | calibration | noise | noise | ocean | ocean | water | water | sea water | sea water | telemetry | telemetry | data recorder | data recorder | satellite | satellite | current | current | salinity | salinity | pressure | pressure | corrosion | corrosion | underwater | underwater

License

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2.016 Hydrodynamics (13.012) (MIT) 2.016 Hydrodynamics (13.012) (MIT)

Description

This course covers the development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and their simplifications for several areas of marine hydrodynamics and the application of these principles to the solution of engineering problems. Topics include the principles of conservation of mass, momentum and energy, lift and drag forces, laminar and turbulent flows, dimensional analysis, added mass, and linear surface waves, including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Wave forces on structures are treated in the context of design and basic seakeeping analysis of ships and offshore platforms. Geophysical fluid dynamics will also be addressed including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density; heat balance in the ocean; major ocean circulations and This course covers the development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and their simplifications for several areas of marine hydrodynamics and the application of these principles to the solution of engineering problems. Topics include the principles of conservation of mass, momentum and energy, lift and drag forces, laminar and turbulent flows, dimensional analysis, added mass, and linear surface waves, including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Wave forces on structures are treated in the context of design and basic seakeeping analysis of ships and offshore platforms. Geophysical fluid dynamics will also be addressed including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density; heat balance in the ocean; major ocean circulations and

Subjects

fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | lift | lift | drag | drag | laminar | laminar | turbulent | turbulent | turbulence | turbulence | wave | wave | waves | waves | surface waves | surface waves | current | current | water | water | ocean | ocean | force | force | sea | sea | sea wave | sea wave | ship | ship | propulsion | propulsion | propeller | propeller | fish | fish | swimming | swimming | wind | wind | VIV | VIV | vortex induced vibration | vortex induced vibration | Bernoulli | Bernoulli | D'Allembert | D'Allembert | hydrostatics | hydrostatics | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.002 Mechanics and Materials II (MIT) 2.002 Mechanics and Materials II (MIT)

Description

This course provides Mechanical Engineering students with an awareness of various responses exhibited by solid engineering materials when subjected to mechanical and thermal loadings; an introduction to the physical mechanisms associated with design-limiting behavior of engineering materials, especially stiffness, strength, toughness, and durability; an understanding of basic mechanical properties of engineering materials, testing procedures used to quantify these properties, and ways in which these properties characterize material response; quantitative skills to deal with materials-limiting problems in engineering design; and a basis for materials selection in mechanical design. This course provides Mechanical Engineering students with an awareness of various responses exhibited by solid engineering materials when subjected to mechanical and thermal loadings; an introduction to the physical mechanisms associated with design-limiting behavior of engineering materials, especially stiffness, strength, toughness, and durability; an understanding of basic mechanical properties of engineering materials, testing procedures used to quantify these properties, and ways in which these properties characterize material response; quantitative skills to deal with materials-limiting problems in engineering design; and a basis for materials selection in mechanical design.

Subjects

beam bending | beam bending | buckling | buckling | vibration | vibration | polymers | polymers | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | strength | strength | ductility | ductility | stress | stress | stress concentration | stress concentration | sheet bending | sheet bending | heat treatment | heat treatment | fracture | fracture | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fatigue | fatigue | solid materials | solid materials | mechanical loading | mechanical loading | thermal loading | thermal loading | design-limiting behavior | design-limiting behavior | stiffness | stiffness | toughness | toughness | durability | durability | engineering materials | engineering materials | materials-limiting problem | materials-limiting problem | materials selection | materials selection

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2.27 Turbulent Flow and Transport (MIT) 2.27 Turbulent Flow and Transport (MIT)

Description

Turbulent flows, with emphasis on engineering methods. Governing equations for momentum, energy, and species transfer. Turbulence: its production, dissipation, and scaling laws. Reynolds averaged equations for momentum, energy, and species transfer. Simple closure approaches for free and bounded turbulent shear flows. Applications to jets, pipe and channel flows, boundary layers, buoyant plumes and thermals, and Taylor dispersion, etc., including heat and species transport as well as flow fields. Introduction to more complex closure schemes, including the k-epsilon, and statistical methods in turbulence. Turbulent flows, with emphasis on engineering methods. Governing equations for momentum, energy, and species transfer. Turbulence: its production, dissipation, and scaling laws. Reynolds averaged equations for momentum, energy, and species transfer. Simple closure approaches for free and bounded turbulent shear flows. Applications to jets, pipe and channel flows, boundary layers, buoyant plumes and thermals, and Taylor dispersion, etc., including heat and species transport as well as flow fields. Introduction to more complex closure schemes, including the k-epsilon, and statistical methods in turbulence.

Subjects

Turbulent Flow | | Turbulent Flow | | Fundamental Laws | | Fundamental Laws | | Turbulent Boundary Layers | | Turbulent Boundary Layers | | Free Shear Flows | Free Shear Flows | Fluid dynamics | Fluid dynamics

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3.21 Kinetic Processes in Materials (MIT) 3.21 Kinetic Processes in Materials (MIT)

Description

This course presents a unified treatment of phenomenological and atomistic kinetic processes in materials. It provides the foundation for the advanced understanding of processing, microstructural evolution, and behavior for a broad spectrum of materials. The course emphasizes analysis and development of rigorous comprehension of fundamentals. Topics include: irreversible thermodynamics; diffusion; nucleation; phase transformations; fluid and heat transport; morphological instabilities; gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid reactions. This course presents a unified treatment of phenomenological and atomistic kinetic processes in materials. It provides the foundation for the advanced understanding of processing, microstructural evolution, and behavior for a broad spectrum of materials. The course emphasizes analysis and development of rigorous comprehension of fundamentals. Topics include: irreversible thermodynamics; diffusion; nucleation; phase transformations; fluid and heat transport; morphological instabilities; gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid reactions.

Subjects

Thermodynamics | Thermodynamics | field | field | gradient | gradient | continuity equation | continuity equation | irreversible thermodynamics | irreversible thermodynamics | entropy | entropy | Onsager's symmetry principle | Onsager's symmetry principle | diffusion | diffusion | capillarity | capillarity | stress | stress | diffusion equation | diffusion equation | crystal | crystal | jump process | jump process | jump rate | jump rate | diffusivity | diffusivity | interstitial | interstitial | Kroger-Vink | Kroger-Vink | grain boundary | grain boundary | isotropic | isotropic | Rayleigh instability | Rayleigh instability | Gibbs-Thomson | Gibbs-Thomson | particle coarsening | particle coarsening | growth kinetics | growth kinetics | phase transformation | phase transformation | nucleation | nucleation | spinoldal decomposition | spinoldal decomposition

License

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3.044 Materials Processing (MIT)

Description

The goal of 3.044 is to teach cost-effective and sustainable production of solid material with a desired geometry, structure or distribution of structures, and production volume. Toward this end, it is organized around different types of phase transformations which determine the structure in various processes for making materials, in roughly increasing order of entropy change during those transformations: solid heat treatment, liquid-solid processing, fluid behavior, deformation processing, and vapor-solid processing. The course ends with several lectures that place the subject in the context of society at large.

Subjects

diffusion | chemical reaction | phase transformation | heat transport | mass transport | fluid | fluid flow | recycling | cost modeling | multilayer | biot number | radiation | convection | titanium | moving bodies | Reynolds number | turbulence | reactor | deformation | polymer | vapor transport | nanotechnology

License

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6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT) 6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world. This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world.

Subjects

approximation | approximation | science | science | engineering | engineering | managing complexity | managing complexity | divide and conquer | divide and conquer | heterogeneous hierarchies | heterogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | proportional reasoning | proportional reasoning | conservation/box models | conservation/box models | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | special cases | special cases | extreme cases | extreme cases | discretization | discretization | spring models | spring models | symmetry | symmetry | invariance | invariance | discarding information | discarding information | oil imports | oil imports | tree representations | tree representations | gold | gold | random walks | random walks | UNIX | UNIX | triangle bisection | triangle bisection | pentagonal heat flow | pentagonal heat flow | jump heights | jump heights | simple calculus | simple calculus | drag | drag | cycling | cycling | swimming | swimming | flying | flying | flight | flight | algebraic symmetry | algebraic symmetry | densities | densities | hydrogen size | hydrogen size | bending of light | bending of light | Buckingham Pi Theorem | Buckingham Pi Theorem | pulley acceleration | pulley acceleration | waves | waves

License

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10.37 Chemical and Biological Reaction Engineering (MIT) 10.37 Chemical and Biological Reaction Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course applies the concepts of reaction rate, stoichiometry and equilibrium to the analysis of chemical and biological reacting systems, derivation of rate expressions from reaction mechanisms and equilibrium or steady state assumptions, design of chemical and biochemical reactors via synthesis of chemical kinetics, transport phenomena, and mass and energy balances. Topics covered include: chemical/biochemical pathways; enzymatic, pathway, and cell growth kinetics; batch, plug flow and well-stirred reactors for chemical reactions and cultivations of microorganisms and mammalian cells; heterogeneous and enzymatic catalysis; heat and mass transport in reactors, including diffusion to and within catalyst particles and cells or immobilized enzymes. This course applies the concepts of reaction rate, stoichiometry and equilibrium to the analysis of chemical and biological reacting systems, derivation of rate expressions from reaction mechanisms and equilibrium or steady state assumptions, design of chemical and biochemical reactors via synthesis of chemical kinetics, transport phenomena, and mass and energy balances. Topics covered include: chemical/biochemical pathways; enzymatic, pathway, and cell growth kinetics; batch, plug flow and well-stirred reactors for chemical reactions and cultivations of microorganisms and mammalian cells; heterogeneous and enzymatic catalysis; heat and mass transport in reactors, including diffusion to and within catalyst particles and cells or immobilized enzymes.

Subjects

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