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10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT) 10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed. The examples will use MATLAB®. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Robert Ashcraft, Sandeep Sharma, David Weingeist, and Nikolay Zaborenko for their work in preparing materials for this course site. Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed. The examples will use MATLAB®. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Robert Ashcraft, Sandeep Sharma, David Weingeist, and Nikolay Zaborenko for their work in preparing materials for this course site.

Subjects

Matlab | Matlab | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | linear systems | linear systems | scientific computing | scientific computing | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | probability theory | probability theory | use of probability theory in physical modeling | use of probability theory in physical modeling | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | finite difference techniques | finite difference techniques | finite element techniques | finite element techniques | converting partial differential equations | converting partial differential equations | Navier-Stokes equations | Navier-Stokes equations

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12.002 Physics and Chemistry of the Terrestrial Planets (MIT) 12.002 Physics and Chemistry of the Terrestrial Planets (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the structure, composition, and physical processes governing the terrestrial planets, including their formation and basic orbital properties. Topics include plate tectonics, earthquakes, seismic waves, rheology, impact cratering, gravity and magnetic fields, heat flux, thermal structure, mantle convection, deep interiors, planetary magnetism, and core dynamics. Suitable for majors and non-majors seeking general background in geophysics and planetary structure. This course introduces the structure, composition, and physical processes governing the terrestrial planets, including their formation and basic orbital properties. Topics include plate tectonics, earthquakes, seismic waves, rheology, impact cratering, gravity and magnetic fields, heat flux, thermal structure, mantle convection, deep interiors, planetary magnetism, and core dynamics. Suitable for majors and non-majors seeking general background in geophysics and planetary structure.

Subjects

Terrestrial Planets | Terrestrial Planets | Disk Accretion | Disk Accretion | Planetary Formation | Planetary Formation | Geochronology | Geochronology | Solar System | Solar System | Elastic stress and strain | Elastic stress and strain | Seismic Waves and wave equation | Seismic Waves and wave equation | Seismology | Seismology | Heat | Heat | Diffusion | Diffusion | Geomagnetism | Geomagnetism | Paleomagnetism | Paleomagnetism | Plate Tectonics | Plate Tectonics | Topography | Topography | Isostasy | Isostasy | Gravity Anomalies | Gravity Anomalies

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12.842 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT) 12.842 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history. It is offered to both undergraduate and graduate students with different requirements. This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history. It is offered to both undergraduate and graduate students with different requirements.

Subjects

climate | climate | climate change | climate change | proxies | proxies | ice cores | ice cores | primordial atmosphere | primordial atmosphere | ozone chemistry | ozone chemistry | carbon and oxygen cycles | carbon and oxygen cycles | heat and water budgets | heat and water budgets | aerosols | aerosols | water vapor | water vapor | clouds | clouds | ocean circulation | ocean circulation | orbital variations | orbital variations | volcanism | volcanism | plate tectonics | plate tectonics | solar system | solar system | solar variability | solar variability | climate model | climate model | energy balance | energy balance

License

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12.812 General Circulation of the Earth's Atmosphere (MIT) 12.812 General Circulation of the Earth's Atmosphere (MIT)

Description

This course examines diagnostic studies of the Earth's atmosphere and discusses their implications for the theory of the structure and general circulation of the Earth's atmosphere. It includes some discussion of the validation and use of general circulation models as atmospheric analogs. This course examines diagnostic studies of the Earth's atmosphere and discusses their implications for the theory of the structure and general circulation of the Earth's atmosphere. It includes some discussion of the validation and use of general circulation models as atmospheric analogs.

Subjects

atmosphere | atmosphere | Eliassen-Palm Theorem | Eliassen-Palm Theorem | Eliassen-Palm flux | Eliassen-Palm flux | eddy fluxes | eddy fluxes | angular momentum | angular momentum | kinetic energy | kinetic energy | potential energy | potential energy | water vapor | water vapor | hydrological cycle | hydrological cycle | energy cycle | energy cycle | heat budget | heat budget | radiation budget | radiation budget | spectral analysis | spectral analysis | zonal mean circulations | zonal mean circulations | mean meridional circulation | mean meridional circulation

License

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16.512 Rocket Propulsion (MIT) 16.512 Rocket Propulsion (MIT)

Description

This class focuses on chemical rocket propulsion systems for launch, orbital, and interplanetary flight. It studies the modeling of solid, liquid-bipropellant, and hybrid rocket engines. Thermochemistry, prediction of specific impulse, and nozzle flows including real gas and kinetic effects will also be covered. Other topics to be covered include structural constraints, propellant feed systems, turbopumps, and combustion processes in solid, liquid, and hybrid rockets. This class focuses on chemical rocket propulsion systems for launch, orbital, and interplanetary flight. It studies the modeling of solid, liquid-bipropellant, and hybrid rocket engines. Thermochemistry, prediction of specific impulse, and nozzle flows including real gas and kinetic effects will also be covered. Other topics to be covered include structural constraints, propellant feed systems, turbopumps, and combustion processes in solid, liquid, and hybrid rockets.

Subjects

chemical rocket propulsion systems for launch | chemical rocket propulsion systems for launch | orbital | orbital | and interplanetary flight | and interplanetary flight | Modeling of solid propellant | Modeling of solid propellant | liquid-bipropellant | liquid-bipropellant | hybrid rocket engines | hybrid rocket engines | thermochemistry | thermochemistry | prediction of specific impulse | prediction of specific impulse | nozzle flows including real gas and kinetic effects | nozzle flows including real gas and kinetic effects | structural constraints | structural constraints | propellant feed systems | propellant feed systems | turbopumps | turbopumps | combustion processes in solid | combustion processes in solid | liquid | liquid | and hybrid rockets | and hybrid rockets | cooling | cooling | heat sink | heat sink | ablative | ablative

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16.120 Compressible Flow (MIT) 16.120 Compressible Flow (MIT)

Description

The course begins with the basics of compressible fluid dynamics, including governing equations, thermodynamic context and characteristic parameters. The next large block of lectures covers quasi-one-dimensional flow, followed by a discussion of disturbances and unsteady flows. The second half of the course comprises gas dynamic discontinuities, including shock waves and detonations, and concludes with another large block dealing with two-dimensional flows, both linear and non-linear. The course begins with the basics of compressible fluid dynamics, including governing equations, thermodynamic context and characteristic parameters. The next large block of lectures covers quasi-one-dimensional flow, followed by a discussion of disturbances and unsteady flows. The second half of the course comprises gas dynamic discontinuities, including shock waves and detonations, and concludes with another large block dealing with two-dimensional flows, both linear and non-linear.

Subjects

compressible fluid dynamics | compressible fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | external flows | external flows | internal flows | internal flows | quasi-on-dimensional | quasi-on-dimensional | quasi-1D | quasi-1D | channel flow | channel flow | multi-dimensional flows | multi-dimensional flows | nozzles | nozzles | diffusers | diffusers | inlets | inlets | loss generation | loss generation | interactions | interactions | aerodynamic shapes | aerodynamic shapes | subsonic | subsonic | supersonic | supersonic | transonic | transonic | hypersonic | hypersonic | shock waves | shock waves | vortices | vortices | disturbance behavior | disturbance behavior | unsteady | unsteady | speed of sound | speed of sound | isentropic flows | isentropic flows | non-isentropic flows | non-isentropic flows | potential flows | potential flows | rotational flows | rotational flows | shaft work | shaft work | heat addition | heat addition | mass addition | mass addition | flow states | flow states | flow regime | flow regime | velocity non-uniformities | velocity non-uniformities | density non-uniformities | density non-uniformities | fluid system components | fluid system components | lift | lift | drag | drag | continuum flow | continuum flow | shock strength | shock strength | characteristics | characteristics | governing equations | governing equations | thermodynamic context | thermodynamic context | characteristic parameters | characteristic parameters | quasi-one-dimensional flow | quasi-one-dimensional flow | disturbances | disturbances | unsteady flow | unsteady flow | gas dynamic discontinuities | gas dynamic discontinuities | detonations | detonations | linear two-dimensional flows | linear two-dimensional flows | non-linear two-dimensional flows | non-linear two-dimensional flows

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18.152 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations (MIT) 18.152 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations (MIT)

Description

This course introduces three main types of partial differential equations: diffusion, elliptic, and hyperbolic. It includes mathematical tools, real-world examples and applications. This course introduces three main types of partial differential equations: diffusion, elliptic, and hyperbolic. It includes mathematical tools, real-world examples and applications.

Subjects

diffusion | diffusion | elliptic | elliptic | hyperbolic | hyperbolic | partial differential equation | partial differential equation | Initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations | Initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations | Sturm-Liouville theory and eigenfunction expansions | Sturm-Liouville theory and eigenfunction expansions | initial value problems | initial value problems | wave equation;heat equation | wave equation;heat equation | Dirichlet problem | Dirichlet problem | Laplace operator and potential theory | Laplace operator and potential theory | Black-Scholes equation | Black-Scholes equation | water waves | water waves | scalar conservation laws | scalar conservation laws | first order equations | first order equations

License

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18.303 Linear Partial Differential Equations: Analysis and Numerics (MIT) 18.303 Linear Partial Differential Equations: Analysis and Numerics (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with the basic analytical and computational tools of linear partial differential equations (PDEs) for practical applications in science engineering, including heat/diffusion, wave, and Poisson equations. Analytics emphasize the viewpoint of linear algebra and the analogy with finite matrix problems. Numerics focus on finite-difference and finite-element techniques to reduce PDEs to matrix problems. This course provides students with the basic analytical and computational tools of linear partial differential equations (PDEs) for practical applications in science engineering, including heat/diffusion, wave, and Poisson equations. Analytics emphasize the viewpoint of linear algebra and the analogy with finite matrix problems. Numerics focus on finite-difference and finite-element techniques to reduce PDEs to matrix problems.

Subjects

diffusion | diffusion | Laplace equations | Laplace equations | Poisson | Poisson | wave equations | wave equations | separation of variables | separation of variables | Fourier series | Fourier series | Fourier transforms | Fourier transforms | eigenvalue problems | eigenvalue problems | Green's function | Green's function | Heat Equation | Heat Equation | Sturm-Liouville Eigenvalue problems | Sturm-Liouville Eigenvalue problems | quasilinear PDEs | quasilinear PDEs | Bessel functionsORDS | Bessel functionsORDS

License

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18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is about mathematical analysis of continuum models of various natural phenomena. Such models are generally described by partial differential equations (PDE) and for this reason much of the course is devoted to the analysis of PDE. Examples of applications come from physics, chemistry, biology, complex systems: traffic flows, shock waves, hydraulic jumps, bio-fluid flows, chemical reactions, diffusion, heat transfer, population dynamics, and pattern formation. This course is about mathematical analysis of continuum models of various natural phenomena. Such models are generally described by partial differential equations (PDE) and for this reason much of the course is devoted to the analysis of PDE. Examples of applications come from physics, chemistry, biology, complex systems: traffic flows, shock waves, hydraulic jumps, bio-fluid flows, chemical reactions, diffusion, heat transfer, population dynamics, and pattern formation.

Subjects

partial differential equation | partial differential equation | hyperbolic equations | hyperbolic equations | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | perturbation methods | perturbation methods | hyperbolic systems | hyperbolic systems | diffusion and reaction processes | diffusion and reaction processes | continuum models | continuum models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models

License

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18.336 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (MIT) 18.336 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods. This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.

Subjects

advection equation | advection equation | heat equation | heat equation | wave equation | wave equation | Airy equation | Airy equation | convection-diffusion problems | convection-diffusion problems | KdV equation | KdV equation | hyperbolic conservation laws | hyperbolic conservation laws | Poisson equation | Poisson equation | Stokes problem | Stokes problem | Navier-Stokes equations | Navier-Stokes equations | interface problems | interface problems | consistency | consistency | stability | stability | convergence | convergence | Lax equivalence theorem | Lax equivalence theorem | error analysis | error analysis | Fourier approaches | Fourier approaches | staggered grids | staggered grids | shocks | shocks | front propagation | front propagation | preconditioning | preconditioning | multigrid | multigrid | Krylov spaces | Krylov spaces | saddle point problems | saddle point problems | finite differences | finite differences | finite volumes | finite volumes | finite elements | finite elements | ENO/WENO | ENO/WENO | spectral methods | spectral methods | projection approaches for incompressible ows | projection approaches for incompressible ows | level set methods | level set methods | particle methods | particle methods | direct and iterative methods | direct and iterative methods

License

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21F.414 German Culture, Media, and Society (MIT)

Description

The topic for Fall 2006 is short film and radio plays. This course investigates current trends and topics in German literary, theater, film, television, radio, and other media arts productions. Students analyze media texts in the context of their production, reception, and distribution as well as the public debates initiated by these works. The topic for Fall 2006 is German Short Film, a popular format that represents most recent trends in film production, and German Radio Art, a striving genre that includes experimental radio plays, sound art, and audio installations. Special attention will be given to the representation of German minorities, contrasted by their own artistic expressions reflecting changes in identity and a new political voice. Students have the opportunity to discuss cour

Subjects

German | Germany | kurtzfilm | radio | radio plays | theater | film | television | media | media text | production | filmmaker | art | broadcast | experimental radio art

License

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21F.716 Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature (MIT)

Description

This course studies important twentieth century texts from Spain and Latin America. The readings include short stories, theatre, the novel and poetry. This subject is conducted in Spanish and all reading and writing for the course is also done in Spanish.

Subjects

Contemporary | Hispanic | Literature | twentieth century | texts | Spain | Latin America | short stories | theatre | novel | poetry | iterary | cultural | issues | historical | political | geographical | settings | New World | Old World | human experience | film | El Pa?s

License

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21H.235 Metropolis: History of New York City (MIT) 21H.235 Metropolis: History of New York City (MIT)

Description

Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. —Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other citie Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. —Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other citie

Subjects

New York City | New York City | metropolis | metropolis | Harlem | Harlem | Bronx | Bronx | Brooklyn | Brooklyn | Queens | Queens | Long Island | Long Island | Manhattan | Manhattan | gay society | gay society | New Amsterdam | New Amsterdam | working class | working class | Haudenosaunee | Haudenosaunee | sex work | sex work | Chinatown | Chinatown | Tammany Hall | Tammany Hall | race relations | race relations | Civil War | Civil War | immigration | immigration | organized crime | organized crime | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | urban planning | urban planning

License

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21L.010 Writing with Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.010 Writing with Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

William Shakespeare didn't go to college. If he time-traveled like Dr. Who, he would be stunned to find his words on a university syllabus. However, he would not be surprised at the way we will be using those words in this class, because the study of rhetoric was essential to all education in his day. At Oxford, William Gager argued that drama allowed undergraduates "to try their voices and confirm their memories, and to frame their speech and conform it to convenient action": in other words, drama was useful. Shakespeare's fellow playwright Thomas Heywood similarly recalled: In the time of my residence in Cambridge, I have seen Tragedies, Comedies, Histories, Pastorals and Shows, publicly acted…: this is held necessary for the emboldening of their Junior scholars, to ar William Shakespeare didn't go to college. If he time-traveled like Dr. Who, he would be stunned to find his words on a university syllabus. However, he would not be surprised at the way we will be using those words in this class, because the study of rhetoric was essential to all education in his day. At Oxford, William Gager argued that drama allowed undergraduates "to try their voices and confirm their memories, and to frame their speech and conform it to convenient action": in other words, drama was useful. Shakespeare's fellow playwright Thomas Heywood similarly recalled: In the time of my residence in Cambridge, I have seen Tragedies, Comedies, Histories, Pastorals and Shows, publicly acted…: this is held necessary for the emboldening of their Junior scholars, to ar

Subjects

21W.734 | 21W.734 | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Study of Rhetoric | Study of Rhetoric | Thomas Heywood | Thomas Heywood | Tragedies | Tragedies | Comedies | Comedies | Histories | Histories | Pastorals | Pastorals | Dialectic | Dialectic | Rhetoric | Rhetoric | Ethic | Ethic | Metaphysical Lectures | Metaphysical Lectures | Argumentation | Argumentation | Theater | Theater

License

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances. Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater. | theater.

License

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21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT)

Description

At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho

Subjects

Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Authors | Authors | Literature | Literature | Shaw | Shaw | Isben | Isben

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21M.606 Introduction to Stagecraft (MIT) 21M.606 Introduction to Stagecraft (MIT)

Description

Offered in the spring and fall terms, Introduction to Stagecraft is a hands-on course that gets students working with the tools and techniques of theatrical production in a practical way. It is not a design course but one devoted to artisanship. Among the many remarkable final projects that have been proposed and presented at the end of the course have been a Renaissance hourglass blown in the MIT glass shop and set into a frame turned on our set shop lathe; a four harness loom built by a student who then wove cloth on it; a number of chain mail tunics and coifs; a wide variety of costume and furniture pieces and electrified period lighting fixtures. Offered in the spring and fall terms, Introduction to Stagecraft is a hands-on course that gets students working with the tools and techniques of theatrical production in a practical way. It is not a design course but one devoted to artisanship. Among the many remarkable final projects that have been proposed and presented at the end of the course have been a Renaissance hourglass blown in the MIT glass shop and set into a frame turned on our set shop lathe; a four harness loom built by a student who then wove cloth on it; a number of chain mail tunics and coifs; a wide variety of costume and furniture pieces and electrified period lighting fixtures.

Subjects

stagecraft | stagecraft | shop skills | shop skills | shop machines | shop machines | basic handwork | basic handwork | tools | tools | scenery | scenery | costume | costume | set constuction | set constuction | props | props | stage management | stage management | lighting | lighting | scene painting | scene painting | student project | student project | safety | safety | knots | knots

License

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21M.604 Playwriting I (MIT) 21M.604 Playwriting I (MIT)

Description

This class introduces the craft of writing for the theater. Through weekly assignments, in class writing exercises, and work on a sustained piece, students explore scene structure, action, events, voice, and dialogue. We examine produced playscripts and discuss student work. This class's emphasis is on process, risk-taking, and finding one's own voice and vision. This class introduces the craft of writing for the theater. Through weekly assignments, in class writing exercises, and work on a sustained piece, students explore scene structure, action, events, voice, and dialogue. We examine produced playscripts and discuss student work. This class's emphasis is on process, risk-taking, and finding one's own voice and vision.

Subjects

script | script | playwright | playwright | play writing | play writing | writing | writing | characters | characters | plot | plot | action | action | sound | sound | scene | scene | act | act | dialogue | dialogue | plays | plays

License

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT) 24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers. This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | 24.06 | STS.006 | STS.006 | medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | life support | life support | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | enhancing or cheating | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

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TALAT Lecture 1601: Process modelling applied to age hardening aluminium alloys

Description

This lecture describes the methodology for physical modelling of materials problems, with particular emphasis on heat treatment and welding of age hardening alloys materials; it establishes mathematical relations between different process variables (e.g. alloy composition, heat treatment procedure, welding conditions) and the alloy strength or hardness, based on sound physical principles (e.g. thermodynamics, kinetic theory, dislocation mechanics); it motivates faster process development, optimization of process and properties and development of real-time control. Knowledge in metallurgy, materials science, materials engineering is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | material science | isothermal age hardening | modeling | calibration | isothermal reversion | isothermal precipitation | natural ageing | thermal cycles | corematerials | ukoer

License

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TALAT Lecture 2102.03: The Transmission Housing of an Inboard-Outboard Engine, Special Study: Casting

Description

This lecture offers an example of product development. It imparts knowledge about different ways of casting aluminium and criteria for selecting casting methods; the heat treatment of aluminium; corrosion-proofing and surface treatment of cast alloys used in a saline environment and choice of alloy. It provides insight into how to develop a product using the general specificiations and the interaction between form, material and processing chain and ?the importance of being thoroughly familiar with the different design materials, their processing possibilities and properties. The lecture is recommended for those situations, where a brief, general background information about aluminium is needed as an introduction of other subject areas of aluminium application technologies. This lecture is

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | design | product | properties | stainless steel | magnesium | plastic | conclusion | casting | pressure die-casting | gravity die-casting | sand-casting | choice of alloy | heat treatment | surface treatment | corrosion-proofing | cathodic protection | evaluation | corematerials | ukoer

License

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8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT)

Description

8.01 is a first-semester freshman physics class in Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory. In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Resonance Phenomena, Musical Instruments, Stellar Collapse, Supernovae, Astronomical observations from very high flying balloons (lecture 35), and you will be allowed a peek into the intriguing Quantum World. Also by Walter Lewin Courses: Electricity and Magnetism (8.02) - with a complete set of 36 video lectures from the Spring of 2002 Vibrations and Waves (8.03) - with a complete set of 23 video lectures from the Fall of 2004 Talks: For The Love Of Physics - Profes

Subjects

units of measurement | powers of ten | dimensional analysis | measurement uncertainty | scaling arguments | velocity | speed | acceleration | acceleration of gravity | vectors | motion | vector product | scalar product | projectiles | projectile trajectory | circular motion | centripetal motion | artifical gravity | force | Newton's Three Laws | eight | weightlessness | tension | friction | frictionless forces | static friction | dot products | cross products | kinematics | springs | pendulum | mechanical energy | kinetic energy | universal gravitation | resistive force | drag force | air drag | viscous terminal velocity | potential energy | heat; energy consumption | heat | energy consumption | collisions | center of mass | momentum | Newton's Cradle | impulse and impact | rocket thrust | rocket velocity | flywheels | inertia | torque | spinning rod | elliptical orbits | Kepler's Laws | Doppler shift | stellar dynamics | sound waves | electromagnets | binary star | black holes | rope tension | elasticity | speed of sound | pressure in fluid | Pascal's Principle | hydrostatic pressure | barometric pressure | submarines | buoyant force | Bernoulli's Equations | Archimede's Principle | floating | baloons | resonance | wind instruments | thermal expansion | shrink fitting | particles and waves | diffraction

License

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21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | Shaw | Pirandello | Beckett | Brecht | Williams | Soyinka | Hwang | Churchill | Wilson | Frayn | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Kushner | performance | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | theater | multimedia

License

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10.492-1 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Process Control by Design (MIT)

Description

In the ICE-Topics courses, various chemical engineering problems are presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasis is on the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies.The broad context for this ICE-Topics module is the commonsense notion that, when designing something, one should plan for the off-normal conditions that may occur. A continuous process is conceived and designed as a steady-state operation. However, the process must start up, shut down, and operate in the event of disturbances, and so the time-varying b

Subjects

process control | heat exchanger network | design | shower process | continuous chemical processes | dynamic simulation | implementation | controllers | feedback structure | material model | energy balance model | linearizing equations | Relative Gain Array | Disturbance Cost | proportional control algorithm | steady-state model | numerical linearization | matrix operations | variable pairing | process simulators | design process | offset phenomenon | RGA | DC | heat recovery scheme

License

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6.730 Physics for Solid-State Applications (MIT)

Description

This course examines classical and quantum models of electrons and lattice vibrations in solids, emphasizing physical models for elastic properties, electronic transport, and heat capacity. Topics covered include: crystal lattices, electronic energy band structures, phonon dispersion relatons, effective mass theorem, semiclassical equations of motion, and impurity states in semiconductors, band structure and transport properties of selected semiconductors, and connection of quantum theory of solids with quasifermi levels and Boltzmann transport used in device modeling.

Subjects

physics | solid state application | quantum model | electron | lattice vibration | electronic transport | heat capacity | elastic properties | cystal lattice | electronic energy band | phonon dispersion relatons | effective mass theorem | motion equation | impurity state | semiconductor | band structure | transport properties | quantum theory of solids | quasifermi | Boltzmann transport | device modeling

License

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