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The Roaring Girl or Moll Cutpurse (eBook)

Description

The Roaring Girl or Moll Cutpurse / Thomas Dekker and Thomas Middleton. This is the epub edition of the play. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

jacobean | language | theatre | elizabethan | renaissance | #greatwriters | english | jacobean | language | theatre | elizabethan | renaissance | #greatwriters | english

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Duchess of Malfi: John Webster

Description

In dramatizing a woman's sexual choices in a notably sympathetic manner, this tragedy articulates perennial questions about female autonomy and class distinction. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

jacobean | language | theatre | elizabethan | renaissance | #greatwriters | english | jacobean | language | theatre | elizabethan | renaissance | #greatwriters | english

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Duchess of Malfi (eBook)

Description

The Duchess of Malfi / Webster, John, 1580?-1625. This is the epub edition of the play. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

jacobean | language | theatre | elizabethan | renaissance | #greatwriters | english | jacobean | language | theatre | elizabethan | renaissance | #greatwriters | english

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Is there ever a Faithful Translation?

Description

Second part of the What is Translation podcast series. In this part, the question of whether there can be a faithful translation; does the act of translating a text change the meaning of the original is discussed. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

homer | #greatwriters | theatre | poetry | tragedy | greek | roman | translation | classics | fidelity | homer | #greatwriters | theatre | poetry | tragedy | greek | roman | translation | classics | fidelity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Can Poetry be Translated?

Description

Third part of the What is Translation podcast series. In this part, the question of whether poetry be translated. Is there something within the original that is lost in the translation? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | theatre | poetry | greek | roman | translation | tragedy | #greatwriters | theatre | poetry | greek | roman | translation | tragedy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Who Translates and for Whom?

Description

Fourth part of the What is Translation Podcast series. In this part, the question of who is best placed to translate classic texts; academics, poets, dramatists and who is best placed to receive the translation, students, scholars or the general public. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | theatre | poetry | drama | greek | roman | translation | classics | #greatwriters | theatre | poetry | drama | greek | roman | translation | classics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Defining Tragedy

Description

First dialogue between Oliver Taplin and Joshua Billings on tragedy: they discuss what 'tragedy' means, from its origins in Greek culture to philosophical notions of what tragedy and tragic drama are. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | Euripides | theatre | philosophy | Sophocles | drama | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | tragedy | greek literature | aesthetics | Euripides | theatre | philosophy | Sophocles | drama | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | tragedy | greek literature

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Image from ?Catharine and Petruchio; a comedy in three acts. As it is perform?d at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane. Alter?d [by David Garrick] from Shakespeare?s Taming of the Shrew?, 003354036

Description

Image from ?Catharine and Petruchio; a comedy in three acts. As it is perform?d at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane. Alter?d [by David Garrick] from Shakespeare?s Taming of the Shrew?, 003354036 Author: Shakespeare, William Page: 39 Year: 1756 Place: London Publisher: J. & R. Tonson, and S. Draper Following the link above will take you to the British Library?s integrated catalogue. You will be able to download a PDF of the book this image is taken from, as well as view the pages up close with the 'itemViewer?. Click on the 'related items? to search for the electronic version of this work.

Subjects

bldigital | bl_labs | britishlibrary | 1756 | similar_to_63069100675_place_of_publishing | similar_to_63069100675_slantyness | similar_to_63069100675_bubblyness_avesize | similar_to_63069100675_bubblyness_y | floral motif

License

http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

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http://mechanicalcurator.tumblr.com/

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X0002P0487

Description

Calf on a drip, under a heat lamp for intensive care

Subjects

svmsvet | calf | bovine | intravenous | iv | fluid | therapy | drip | heat | lamp

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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Foundations for politics Foundations for politics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the intellectual and practical skills they will need for the successful study of politics. Module Code: M11014 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 1 Credits:10 Professor Philip Cowley, School of Politics and International Relations Professor Cowley's research interests are primarily in British politics, especially political parties, voting and Parliament. He has three future projects, one major, two more minor. The first is to write the next volume in the British General Election of xxxx series, with Dennis Kavanagh, taking over from David Butler, after his 50+ years involved in the project. As two sidelines, he is This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the intellectual and practical skills they will need for the successful study of politics. Module Code: M11014 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 1 Credits:10 Professor Philip Cowley, School of Politics and International Relations Professor Cowley's research interests are primarily in British politics, especially political parties, voting and Parliament. He has three future projects, one major, two more minor. The first is to write the next volume in the British General Election of xxxx series, with Dennis Kavanagh, taking over from David Butler, after his 50+ years involved in the project. As two sidelines, he is

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | module code M11014 | module code M11014 | politics and international relations | politics and international relations | intellectual and practical skills | intellectual and practical skills | developing effective arguments | developing effective arguments | George Orwell and the politics of the English language | George Orwell and the politics of the English language | Having a heated debate | Having a heated debate | study of politics | study of politics

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Nineteenth and early twentieth century American entertainment culture Nineteenth and early twentieth century American entertainment culture

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn/Spring Semesters 2009/2010 This resource presents material from four different courses taught across the School of American and Canadian Studies and Film and Television Studies. It addresses various aspects of nineteenth and early twentieth century American entertainment culture. You can view module outlines for 4 modules taught within the school: * American Drama (undergraduate year 3 level) * American Sensations (undergraduate year 3 level) * Film History (undergraduate year 1 level) * Emergence of Mass Culture (undergraduate year 2 level) The information contained within the module outlines includes: module objectives, lecture schedules, reading lists, teaching and l This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn/Spring Semesters 2009/2010 This resource presents material from four different courses taught across the School of American and Canadian Studies and Film and Television Studies. It addresses various aspects of nineteenth and early twentieth century American entertainment culture. You can view module outlines for 4 modules taught within the school: * American Drama (undergraduate year 3 level) * American Sensations (undergraduate year 3 level) * Film History (undergraduate year 1 level) * Emergence of Mass Culture (undergraduate year 2 level) The information contained within the module outlines includes: module objectives, lecture schedules, reading lists, teaching and l

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | American and canadian studies | American and canadian studies | Film and television studies | Film and television studies | Sensational novels 1850 | Sensational novels 1850 | Mass market magazines 1900 | Mass market magazines 1900 | Movie palaces 1920 | Movie palaces 1920 | Depession-era theatre 1930 | Depession-era theatre 1930 | Media studies | Media studies | American literature | American literature | Amercian society and culture | Amercian society and culture

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Cu 21, Sn 79 (wt%), peritectic transformation

Description

This microstructure is generated via a peritecticâ?²s reaction (L+?µ = ?·), which bears some similarities to the more familiar eutectic reaction (L = ?±+?²). Upon cooling from the liquid phase field, primary ?µ is formed, which can be seen here as a slightly darker phase than the sheath of ?· surrounding it. The ?· sheath is the product of a peritectic reaction between ?µ and liquid. The peritectic reaction rarely goes to completion, since the formation of ?· around the ?µ phase separates it from the liquid and inhibits further growth. Eventually, the remaining liquid transforms by a eutectic reaction to ?· and Sn. In this micrograph, the constituents of the eutectic mixture cannot be distinguished and it appears

Subjects

alloy | bronze | copper | metal | peritectic reaction | tin | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Cu 21, Sn 79 (wt%), peritectic transformation

Description

This microstructure is generated via a peritectic reaction (L+? = ?), which bears some similarities to the more familiar eutectic reaction (L = ? + ?). Upon cooling from the liquid phase field, primary ? is formed, which can be seen here as a slightly darker phase than the sheath of ? surrounding it. The ? sheath is the product of a peritectic reaction between ? and liquid. The peritectic reaction rarely goes to completion, since the formation of ? around the ? phase separates it from the liquid and inhibits further growth. Eventually, the remaining liquid transforms by a eutectic reaction to ? and Sn. In this micrograph, the constituents of the eutectic mixture cannot be distinguished and it appears uniformly dark.

Subjects

alloy | bronze | copper | metal | peritectic reaction | tin | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Blackheart cast iron

Description

Blackheart cast iron is produced by heating white cast iron at 900-950 C for many days before cooling slowly. This results in a microstructure containing irregular though equiaxed nodules of graphite in a ferritic matrix. The term "blackheart" comes from the fact that the fracture surface has a grey or black appearance due to the presence of graphite at the surface. The purpose of the heat treatment is to increase the ductility of the cast iron.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | iron | metal | white cast iron | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Blackheart cast iron

Description

Blackheart cast iron is produced by heating white cast iron at 900-950 C for many days before cooling slowly. This results in a microstructure containing irregular though equiaxed nodules of graphite in a ferritic matrix. The term "blackheart" comes from the fact that the fracture surface has a grey or black appearance due to the presence of graphite at the surface. The purpose of the heat treatment is to increase the ductility of the cast iron.

Subjects

alloy | carbon | iron | metal | white cast iron | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Al-4 wt% Cu, age hardened alloy

Description

This alloy was solution treated. Hardening is achieved by the controlled rejection of copper from a supersaturated solid solution. There is some additional hardening from precipitates such as MgSi2. From the phase diagram for the pure aluminium-copper binary system, it can be seen that the solubility of copper in -aluminium increases with increasing temperature up to the eutectic temperature of about 550C. The equilibrium microstructure below the eutectic temperature is a two-phase mixture of -aluminium and the Al2Cu intermetallic phase (also known as ? phase). The initial solution heat treatment aims to obtain the maximum possible concentration of copper in solution. Rapid quenching from the solution temperature prevents the kinetically slow precipitation of , forming a highly super

Subjects

aged | alloy | aluminium | copper | hardening | heat treatment | metal | quenching | vacancy | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Al-4 wt% Cu, over aged alloy

Description

Prolonged heat treatment above 150C to 200C has led to the evolution of the stable CuAl2 phase (?). The CuAl2 phase is visible at high magnifications. It does not contribute to the strength of the alloy and the over aged aluminium has poor mechanical properties.

Subjects

aged | alloy | aluminium | copper | hardening | heat treatment | metal | quenching | vacancy | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Al-4 wt% Cu, over aged alloy

Description

Prolonged heat treatment above 150C to 200C has led to the evolution of the stable CuAl2 phase (?). The CuAl2 phase is visible at high magnifications. It does not contribute to the strength of the alloy and the over aged aluminium has poor mechanical properties.

Subjects

aged | alloy | aluminium | copper | hardening | heat treatment | metal | quenching | vacancy | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Al-4 wt% Cu, over aged alloy

Description

Prolonged heat treatment above 150C to 200C has led to the evolution of the stable CuAl2 phase (?). The CuAl2 phase is visible at high magnifications. It does not contribute to the strength of the alloy and the over aged aluminium has poor mechanical properties.

Subjects

aged | alloy | aluminium | copper | hardening | heat treatment | metal | quenching | vacancy | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Al-4 wt% Cu, over aged alloy

Description

Prolonged heat treatment above 150C to 200C has led to the evolution of the stable CuAl2 phase (?). The CuAl2 phase is visible at high magnifications. It does not contribute to the strength of the alloy and the over aged aluminium has poor mechanical properties.

Subjects

aged | alloy | aluminium | copper | hardening | heat treatment | metal | quenching | vacancy | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Al-4 wt% Cu, over aged alloy

Description

Prolonged heat treatment above 150C to 200C has led to the evolution of the stable CuAl2 phase (?). The CuAl2 phase is visible at high magnifications. It does not contribute to the strength of the alloy and the over aged aluminium has poor mechanical properties.

Subjects

aged | alloy | aluminium | copper | hardening | heat treatment | metal | quenching | vacancy | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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