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11.947 Sustainable Economic Development (MIT) 11.947 Sustainable Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This course explores the application of environmental and economic development planning, policy and management approaches to urban neighborhood community development. Through an applied service learning approach, the course requires students to prepare a sustainable development plan for a community-based non-profit organization. Through this client-based planning project, students will have the opportunity to test how sustainable development concepts and different economic and environmental planning approaches can be applied to advance specific community goals within the constraints of specific neighborhoods and community organizations. This course explores the application of environmental and economic development planning, policy and management approaches to urban neighborhood community development. Through an applied service learning approach, the course requires students to prepare a sustainable development plan for a community-based non-profit organization. Through this client-based planning project, students will have the opportunity to test how sustainable development concepts and different economic and environmental planning approaches can be applied to advance specific community goals within the constraints of specific neighborhoods and community organizations.

Subjects

sustainable development | sustainable development | economic development | economic development | brownfields | brownfields | neighborhoods | neighborhoods | market analysis | market analysis | industrial ecology | industrial ecology | green development | green development | economic base analysis | economic base analysis | economic indicators | economic indicators | environmental risks | environmental risks | pollution | pollution | environmental health | environmental health | environmental justice | environmental justice | green design | green design | technology transfer | technology transfer | small business development | small business development | land use planning | land use planning

License

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EPS 622: Sustainable Development EPS 622: Sustainable Development

Description

Challenges of sustainable development in the United States and in other countries, influence of sustainable development concepts on environmental decision-making, sustainable development as a paradigm for environmental policy-making. Challenges of sustainable development in the United States and in other countries, influence of sustainable development concepts on environmental decision-making, sustainable development as a paradigm for environmental policy-making.

Subjects

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Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability

Description

This free course, Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability, introduces ways in which systems thinking can help support processes of decision making among stakeholders with different, often contrasting, perspectives on sustainable development in order to generate purposeful action to improve situations of change and uncertainty. You will be encouraged to engage with the concept of sustainable development, and discover and contextualise your own sustainable development beliefs and values. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability, introduces ways in which systems thinking can help support processes of decision making among stakeholders with different, often contrasting, perspectives on sustainable development in order to generate purposeful action to improve situations of change and uncertainty. You will be encouraged to engage with the concept of sustainable development, and discover and contextualise your own sustainable development beliefs and values. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Systems (Computer) | Systems (Computer) | energy | energy | future | future | global warming | global warming | acid rain | acid rain

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrial ized nations | industrial ized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business

License

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrialized nations | industrialized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business | aging | aging | population | population | countries | countries | developing | developing | development | development | industrial | industrial | industrialized | industrialized | nations | nations | politics | politics | political | political | theory | theory | sustainable | sustainable | public | public | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | economies | economies | transition | transition | growth | growth | institutions | institutions | institutional | institutional | trade | trade | international | international

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrial ized nations | industrial ized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability

Description

This free course introduces ways in which systems thinking can help support processes of decision making among stakeholders with different often contrasting perspectives on sustainable development in order to generate purposeful action to improve situations of change and uncertainty. You will be encouraged to engage with the concept of sustainable development and discover and contextualise your own sustainable development beliefs and values.

Subjects

ICT | T306_3 | sustainable development | energy | future | global warming | acid rain

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability

Description

This free course introduces ways in which systems thinking can help support processes of decision making among stakeholders with different often contrasting perspectives on sustainable development in order to generate purposeful action to improve situations of change and uncertainty. You will be encouraged to engage with the concept of sustainable development and discover and contextualise your own sustainable development beliefs and values.

Subjects

Systems (Computer) | energy | future | global warming | acid rain

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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11.947 Sustainable Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This course explores the application of environmental and economic development planning, policy and management approaches to urban neighborhood community development. Through an applied service learning approach, the course requires students to prepare a sustainable development plan for a community-based non-profit organization. Through this client-based planning project, students will have the opportunity to test how sustainable development concepts and different economic and environmental planning approaches can be applied to advance specific community goals within the constraints of specific neighborhoods and community organizations.

Subjects

sustainable development | economic development | brownfields | neighborhoods | market analysis | industrial ecology | green development | economic base analysis | economic indicators | environmental risks | pollution | environmental health | environmental justice | green design | technology transfer | small business development | land use planning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Systems practice: Managing sustainability

Description

This free course, Systems practice: Managing sustainability, introduces ways in which systems thinking can help support processes of decision making amongst stakeholders with different, often contrasting, perspectives on sustainable development in order to generate purposeful action to improve situations of change and uncertainty. You will learn about systems practice for managing sustainable development, and find out how 'learning systems' are designed for purposeful action in the domain of sustainable development. First published on Thu, 05 May 2016 as Systems practice: Managing sustainability. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Computing & ICT | T306_4 | systems thinking | stakeholders

License

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Presentation on embedding sustainable development in language teaching

Description

The slides of a presentation I gave in 2010 on possible ways of embedding sustainable development into the language curricula.

Subjects

License

Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike

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SP.722 D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination (MIT) SP.722 D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination is a design studio course in which students work on international development projects for underserved communities. The class is focused on a participatory, iterative prototyping design process, with particular attention on the constraints faced when designing for developing communities. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students will learn about their partner communities through the collaborative design process and be exposed to many hands-on fabrication and prototyping skills relevant to development at MIT and manufacturing in their partner community. The course will consist of hands-on labs, guest speakers, and a gu D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination is a design studio course in which students work on international development projects for underserved communities. The class is focused on a participatory, iterative prototyping design process, with particular attention on the constraints faced when designing for developing communities. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students will learn about their partner communities through the collaborative design process and be exposed to many hands-on fabrication and prototyping skills relevant to development at MIT and manufacturing in their partner community. The course will consist of hands-on labs, guest speakers, and a gu

Subjects

development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Honduras | Honduras | Zambia | Zambia | Lesotho | Lesotho | Nicaragua | Nicaragua | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | poverty | poverty | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | AIDS | AIDS | solar water disinfection | solar water disinfection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.721 D-Lab: Development, Dialogue and Delivery (MIT) SP.721 D-Lab: Development, Dialogue and Delivery (MIT)

Description

D-Lab is a year-long series of courses and field trips. The fall class provides a basic background in international development and appropriate technology through guest speakers, case studies and hands-on exercises. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in an IAP field trip to Haiti, India, Brazil, Honduras, Zambia, Samoa, or Lesotho and continue their work in a spring term design class. As part of the fall class, students will partner with community organizations in these countries and develop plans for the IAP site visit. In addition, students will learn about the culture, language, economics, politics and history of their host country. D-Lab is a year-long series of courses and field trips. The fall class provides a basic background in international development and appropriate technology through guest speakers, case studies and hands-on exercises. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in an IAP field trip to Haiti, India, Brazil, Honduras, Zambia, Samoa, or Lesotho and continue their work in a spring term design class. As part of the fall class, students will partner with community organizations in these countries and develop plans for the IAP site visit. In addition, students will learn about the culture, language, economics, politics and history of their host country.

Subjects

development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | Haiti | Haiti | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Honduras | Honduras | Zambia | Zambia | Samoa | Samoa | Lesotho | Lesotho | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | cooking | cooking | latrine | latrine | grain mill | grain mill | solar energy | solar energy | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | poverty | poverty | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | co-creation | co-creation | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | medical ethics | medical ethics | infant mortality | infant mortality

License

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International Relations (MIT) International Relations (MIT)

Description

This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior.

Subjects

globalization | globalization | migration | migration | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | environment | environment | public policy | public policy | transnational organization | transnational organization | sustainable development | sustainable development | global change | global change | government | government | technology | technology | security | security | civil society | civil society | political theory | political theory | theory | theory | policy | policy | emergent structures | emergent structures | processes | processes | flows | flows | goods | goods | services | services | national boundaries | national boundaries | international trade | international trade | immigration | immigration | international policies | international policies | macro-level | macro-level | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | comparative politics | comparative politics | integration | integration | national economies | national economies | IR | IR | IPE | IPE | sovereignty | sovereignty | inter-state relations | inter-state relations | supra-state | supra-state | non-state | non-state | narrow globalization | narrow globalization | comlex view | comlex view | international conflict | international conflict | domestic politics | domestic politics | international politics | international politics | population movements | population movements | macro-level behavior | macro-level behavior | complex view | complex view

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.410 Globalization, Migration, and International Relations (MIT) 17.410 Globalization, Migration, and International Relations (MIT)

Description

Tracing the evolution of international interactions, this course examines the dimensions of globalization in terms of scale and scope. It is divided into three parts; together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries – with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. 17.411 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Graduate students are exp Tracing the evolution of international interactions, this course examines the dimensions of globalization in terms of scale and scope. It is divided into three parts; together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries – with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. 17.411 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Graduate students are exp

Subjects

globalization | globalization | migration | migration | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | environment | environment | public policy | public policy | transnational organization | transnational organization | sustainable development | sustainable development | global change | global change | government | government | technology | technology | security | security | civil society | civil society | political theory | political theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.253J Transportation Policy and Environmental Limits (MIT) 1.253J Transportation Policy and Environmental Limits (MIT)

Description

Through a combination of lectures, cases, and class discussions this subject examines the economic and political conflict between transportation and the environment. It investigates the role of government regulation, green business and transportation policy as facilitators of economic development and environmental sustainability. It analyzes a variety of international policy problems including government-business relations; the role of interest groups, non-governmental organizations, and the public and media in the regulation of the automobile; sustainable development; global warming; the politics of risk and siting of transport facilities; environmental justice; equity; and transportation and public health in the urban metropolis. It provides students with an opportunity to apply transpor Through a combination of lectures, cases, and class discussions this subject examines the economic and political conflict between transportation and the environment. It investigates the role of government regulation, green business and transportation policy as facilitators of economic development and environmental sustainability. It analyzes a variety of international policy problems including government-business relations; the role of interest groups, non-governmental organizations, and the public and media in the regulation of the automobile; sustainable development; global warming; the politics of risk and siting of transport facilities; environmental justice; equity; and transportation and public health in the urban metropolis. It provides students with an opportunity to apply transpor

Subjects

public transportation systems | public transportation systems | pollution | pollution | infrastructure | infrastructure | government regulation | government regulation | public policy | public policy | strategic planning management | strategic planning management | labor relations | labor relations | maintenance planning | maintenance planning | administration | administration | financing | financing | marketing policy | marketing policy | fare policy | fare policy | management information | management information | decision support systems | decision support systems | transit industry | transit industry | service provision | service provision | private sector | private sector | 1.253 | 1.253 | 11.543 | 11.543 | ESD.222 | ESD.222

License

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11.364 International Environmental Negotiation (MIT) 11.364 International Environmental Negotiation (MIT)

Description

This seminar will explore the difficulties of getting agreement on global definitions of sustainability; in particularly building international support for efforts to combat climate change created by greenhouse gas emissions as well as other international resource management efforts. We will focus on possible changes in the way global environmental agreements are formulated and implemented, especially on ways of shifting from the current "pollution control" approach to combating climate change to a more comprehensive strategy for taking advantage of sustainable development opportunities. This seminar will explore the difficulties of getting agreement on global definitions of sustainability; in particularly building international support for efforts to combat climate change created by greenhouse gas emissions as well as other international resource management efforts. We will focus on possible changes in the way global environmental agreements are formulated and implemented, especially on ways of shifting from the current "pollution control" approach to combating climate change to a more comprehensive strategy for taking advantage of sustainable development opportunities.

Subjects

sustainability | sustainability | managing common resources | managing common resources | transboundary pollution control | transboundary pollution control | economic development | economic development | social development | social development | environmental resource protection | environmental resource protection | environmental protection standardsinternational negotiations | environmental protection standardsinternational negotiations | multi-lateral negotiations | multi-lateral negotiations | representation | representation | voting | voting | issue linkage | issue linkage | balancing science and politics | balancing science and politics | Climate Change Convention | Climate Change Convention

License

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11.947 Urbanization and Development (MIT) 11.947 Urbanization and Development (MIT)

Description

The course examines the causes and effects of rapid urbanization in developing countries. Using case studies from the world's four major developing regions, including (among others) Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Managua, Singapore, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Kabul, Beirut, Cairo, Kinshasa, Cape Town and Johannesburg, it explores the economic and political dynamics that grease the wheels of contemporary patterns of growth. In addition to examining both local and transnational forces that drive contemporary urbanization, the course focuses on key issues that emerge in rapidly growing cities of the developing world, ranging from growing income inequality and socio-economic exclusion, environmental challenges, and rising violence. Class sessions are discussion-based and focus on a critical analysis o The course examines the causes and effects of rapid urbanization in developing countries. Using case studies from the world's four major developing regions, including (among others) Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Managua, Singapore, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Kabul, Beirut, Cairo, Kinshasa, Cape Town and Johannesburg, it explores the economic and political dynamics that grease the wheels of contemporary patterns of growth. In addition to examining both local and transnational forces that drive contemporary urbanization, the course focuses on key issues that emerge in rapidly growing cities of the developing world, ranging from growing income inequality and socio-economic exclusion, environmental challenges, and rising violence. Class sessions are discussion-based and focus on a critical analysis o

Subjects

sustainable development | sustainable development | economic development | economic development | brownfields | brownfields | neighborhoods | neighborhoods | market analysis | market analysis | industrial ecology | industrial ecology | green development | green development | economic base analysis | economic base analysis | economic indicators | economic indicators | environmental risks | environmental risks | pollution | pollution | environmental health | environmental health | environmental justice | environmental justice | green design | green design | technology transfer | technology transfer | small business development | small business development | land use planning | land use planning

License

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11.366J Planning for Sustainable Development (MIT) 11.366J Planning for Sustainable Development (MIT)

Description

This course explores policy and planning for sustainable development. It critically examines concept of sustainability as a process of social, organizational, and political development drawing on cases from the U.S. and Europe. It also explores pathways to sustainability through debates on ecological modernization; sustainable technology development, international and intergenerational fairness, and democratic governance. This course explores policy and planning for sustainable development. It critically examines concept of sustainability as a process of social, organizational, and political development drawing on cases from the U.S. and Europe. It also explores pathways to sustainability through debates on ecological modernization; sustainable technology development, international and intergenerational fairness, and democratic governance.

Subjects

11.366 | 11.366 | 1.817 | 1.817

License

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14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT) 14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? What is "sustainable development"? How do environmental problems differ in developing countries? Are we running out of oil and other natural resources? Should we be more energy efficient? To gain real world experience, the course is scheduled to include a visit to the MIT cogeneration plant. We will also do This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? What is "sustainable development"? How do environmental problems differ in developing countries? Are we running out of oil and other natural resources? Should we be more energy efficient? To gain real world experience, the course is scheduled to include a visit to the MIT cogeneration plant. We will also do

Subjects

economics | economics | policy | policy | environment | environment | environmental economics | environmental economics | public policy | public policy | cost-benefit analysis | cost-benefit analysis | resource management | resource management | environmental regulation | environmental regulation | health | health | sustainability | sustainability | public goods | public goods | pollution | pollution | Pigouvian taxes | Pigouvian taxes | liability | liability | kuznets curves | kuznets curves | competition | competition | growth | growth | double dividend | double dividend | hedonic | hedonic | valuation | valuation | global warming | global warming | Porter hypothesis | Porter hypothesis | social choice | social choice | carbon offsets | carbon offsets | clean development | clean development | renewables | renewables

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT) MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT)

Description

Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to th Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to th

Subjects

appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | international development | international development | micro-finance | micro-finance | social entrepreneurship | social entrepreneurship | social venture | social venture | communications technology | communications technology | cell phone | cell phone | cellular technology | cellular technology | SMS | SMS | mobile phone | mobile phone | mobile technology | mobile technology | innovation | innovation | health care | health care | economic empowerment | economic empowerment | education | education | civic engagement | civic engagement | bottom of the pyramid | bottom of the pyramid | poverty | poverty | ICT | ICT | ICT4D | ICT4D | can you make a cellphone change the world? | can you make a cellphone change the world?

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | co-creation | co-creation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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(complete 12 unit module with HTML navigation)

Description

This module opens with a review of changes in the contemporary world political economy and their implications for sustainable development. One of the most important factors generating change is globalisation and we examine the ideologies and institutions which serve to integrate all regions and peoples more intensely than ever before. The relationship between patterns of globalisation and endemic poverty and various environmental crises is examined to illustrate the contours of some of the most important challenges facing humanity today and in the future. The module concludes by assessing the potential of various agents and actors at the international, national and local level to modify patterns of production and consumption in more sustainable directions.

Subjects

sustainable development | environment | green | ukoer | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT) EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international develop Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international develop

Subjects

sustainable energy | sustainable energy | renewable energy | renewable energy | green energy | green energy | sustainable development | sustainable development | third world | third world | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | solar power | solar power | wind power | wind power | micro-hydro power | micro-hydro power | design | design | co-creation | co-creation | Nicaragua | Nicaragua

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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