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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international economics | international trade | international trade | Ricardian model | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | trade theory | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | foreign investment | gravity models | gravity models | trade and growth | trade and growth | labor markets | labor markets | offshoring | offshoring | fragmentation of production | fragmentation of production | multinational firms | multinational firms | political economy | political economy | WTO | WTO | world trade organization | world trade organization | dynamic trade theory | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | technology and growth | innovation | innovation | technology transfer | technology transfer | product cycles | product cycles | tariff retaliation | tariff retaliation | regionalism | regionalism

License

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics. This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

Subjects

international economics | international economics | nternational trade | nternational trade | foreign investment | foreign investment | commercial policy | commercial policy | Ricardian models | Ricardian models | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | empirical tests | empirical tests | intermediate input trade | intermediate input trade | wage inequality | wage inequality | external scale economics | external scale economics | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | intraindustry heterogeneity | intraindustry heterogeneity | technological theories of FDI | technological theories of FDI | transaction-cost approach | transaction-cost approach | property-rights approach | property-rights approach | dynamic trade theory | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | technology and growth | innovation | innovation | technology transfer | technology transfer | product cycles | product cycles | tariff retaliation | tariff retaliation | WTO | WTO | regionalism | regionalism | multilateralism | multilateralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international trade | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | gravity models | trade and growth | labor markets | offshoring | fragmentation of production | multinational firms | political economy | WTO | world trade organization | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | innovation | technology transfer | product cycles | tariff retaliation | regionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.54 International Trade (MIT) 14.54 International Trade (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the theory of international trade and finance with applications to current policy issues. In this course we will cover the basic tools to understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. We will also cover applications to a number of topics of current interest, including the debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the U.S. current account deficit, the medium run prospects for exchange rates, European integration, and the debate on global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina. This course is an introduction to the theory of international trade and finance with applications to current policy issues. In this course we will cover the basic tools to understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. We will also cover applications to a number of topics of current interest, including the debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the U.S. current account deficit, the medium run prospects for exchange rates, European integration, and the debate on global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina.

Subjects

theory of international trade | theory of international trade | finance | finance | policy | policy | flow of goods | flow of goods | flow of savings and investments | flow of savings and investments | globalization | globalization | free trade agreements | free trade agreements | the US current account deficit | the US current account deficit | exchange rates | exchange rates | European integration | European integration | global financial architecture | global financial architecture | financial crises | financial crises | East Asia | East Asia | Argentina | Argentina

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography.) It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography.) It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international economics | international trade | international trade | Ricardian model | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | trade theory | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | foreign investment | gravity models | gravity models | offshoring | offshoring | fragmentation of production | fragmentation of production

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international trade | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | gravity models | trade and growth | labor markets | offshoring | fragmentation of production | multinational firms | political economy | WTO | world trade organization | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | innovation | technology transfer | product cycles | tariff retaliation | regionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

Subjects

international economics | nternational trade | foreign investment | commercial policy | Ricardian models | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | empirical tests | intermediate input trade | wage inequality | external scale economics | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | intraindustry heterogeneity | technological theories of FDI | transaction-cost approach | property-rights approach | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | innovation | technology transfer | product cycles | tariff retaliation | WTO | regionalism | multilateralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Killing Fields: The Impact of the Global Arms Trade on Africa

Description

Andrew Feinstein gives a talk for the African Studies Seminar series on the arms trade and its impact on Africa. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Africa | war | politics | arms trade | conflict | arms dealers | Africa | war | politics | arms trade | conflict | arms dealers | 2011-11-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The case of the slave ship Progresso: the Royal Navy, the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the Cape (African Studies Centre Seminar)

Description

Prof. Harries examines the surprising role the Cape played in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and the challenges the Royal Navy was forced to deal with in stopping slave ships. Professor Patrick Harries' (Basel University) examination of the historical role the Cape area played in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade offers significant conclusions on the challenges the Royal Navy faced in prohibiting the slave trade, the reality of conditions aboard slave ships, and how historians might view P.G. Hill's classic work 'Fifty Days on Board a Slave Vessel'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

slave trade | south africa | Africa | slavery | Royal Navy | the Progresso | slave trade | south africa | Africa | slavery | Royal Navy | the Progresso | 2011-02-03

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Free Trade Versus Protectionism Debate

Description

Frank Trentmann talks about the relationship between free trade and the budget and how the conflict between the ideas of free trade and protectionism shaped the 1909 budget. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

liberal | finance | reform | economics | budget | Britain | lloyd george | poverty | free trade | protectionism | liberal | finance | reform | economics | budget | Britain | lloyd george | poverty | free trade | protectionism | 2009-10-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Free Trade Versus Protectionism Debate

Description

Frank Trentmann talks about the relationship between free trade and the budget and how the conflict between the ideas of free trade and protectionism shaped the 1909 budget. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

liberal | finance | reform | economics | budget | Britain | lloyd george | poverty | free trade | protectionism | liberal | finance | reform | economics | budget | Britain | lloyd george | poverty | free trade | protectionism | 2009-10-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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15.223 Global Markets, National Policies, and the Competitive Advantages of Firms (MIT) 15.223 Global Markets, National Policies, and the Competitive Advantages of Firms (MIT)

Description

The world is changing in two fundamental ways. First, the development of a truly global market in products, services, capital, and even certain types of labor is changing the basic terms of competition for an array of different firms and industries. Second, the rules and institutions governing the new international economic order are still in flux. National regulations are no longer adequate yet international accords over trade, intellectual property, labor standards, and a host of other issues are fiercely and frequently contested by competing interests. The final results of these debates will determine who wins and who loses in the new global economy. Understanding the interaction between environment and business around the world is the key to understanding both the possibilities for and The world is changing in two fundamental ways. First, the development of a truly global market in products, services, capital, and even certain types of labor is changing the basic terms of competition for an array of different firms and industries. Second, the rules and institutions governing the new international economic order are still in flux. National regulations are no longer adequate yet international accords over trade, intellectual property, labor standards, and a host of other issues are fiercely and frequently contested by competing interests. The final results of these debates will determine who wins and who loses in the new global economy. Understanding the interaction between environment and business around the world is the key to understanding both the possibilities for and

Subjects

globalization | globalization | market economies | market economies | liberal market economies | liberal market economies | state-driven development | state-driven development | emerging markets | emerging markets | intellectual property | intellectual property | ngo | ngo | sustainability | sustainability | trade policy | trade policy | international trade | international trade | labor standards | labor standards | environmental standards | environmental standards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.762J Supply Chain Planning (SMA 6305) (MIT) 15.762J Supply Chain Planning (SMA 6305) (MIT)

Description

15.762J focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization. The class is recommended for Operations Management concentrators and is a first half-term subject. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 15.762J focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization. The class is recommended for Operations Management concentrators and is a first half-term subject. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA

Subjects

supply chain strategies | supply chain strategies | companies | companies | supply chain components | supply chain components | concepts and models | concepts and models | key tradeoffs and phenomena | key tradeoffs and phenomena | risk pooling and inventory placement | risk pooling and inventory placement | integrated planning and collaboration | integrated planning and collaboration | and information sharing | and information sharing | supply chain analysis and optimization | supply chain analysis and optimization | information sharing | information sharing | 15.762 | 15.762 | 1.273 | 1.273 | ESD.267 | ESD.267 | SMA 6305 | SMA 6305

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.012 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT) 15.012 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on the environment of firms with particular emphasis on economic variables such as GNP, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and international trade. The course is divided into five parts: The first presents the basic tools of macroeconomic management by focusing on historical episodes, particularly in the United States. The second looks at national economic strategies for development. The third section concentrates on the recent financial and currency crises in emerging markets. The fourth part looks at the problems faced by transition economies. Finally, the last module looks at challenges of developed countries. This course will focus on the environment of firms with particular emphasis on economic variables such as GNP, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and international trade. The course is divided into five parts: The first presents the basic tools of macroeconomic management by focusing on historical episodes, particularly in the United States. The second looks at national economic strategies for development. The third section concentrates on the recent financial and currency crises in emerging markets. The fourth part looks at the problems faced by transition economies. Finally, the last module looks at challenges of developed countries.

Subjects

economic variables | economic variables | GNP | GNP | inflation | inflation | interest rates | interest rates | exchange rates | exchange rates | international trade | international trade | macroeconomic management | macroeconomic management | history | history | historical episodes | historical episodes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.062J Drugs, Politics, and Culture (MIT) STS.062J Drugs, Politics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

Examines the relationship between drugs, politics, and society in cross-cultural perspective; use of mind-altering and habit-forming substances by "traditional societies"; the development of a global trade in sugar, opium, and cocaine with the rise of capitalism; and the use and abuse of alcohol, LSD, and Prozac in the US. Finishes by looking at the war on drugs, shifting attitudes to tobacco, and by evaluating America's drug laws. Examines the relationship between drugs, politics, and society in cross-cultural perspective; use of mind-altering and habit-forming substances by "traditional societies"; the development of a global trade in sugar, opium, and cocaine with the rise of capitalism; and the use and abuse of alcohol, LSD, and Prozac in the US. Finishes by looking at the war on drugs, shifting attitudes to tobacco, and by evaluating America's drug laws.

Subjects

drugs | drugs | politics | politics | society | society | cross-cultural perspective | cross-cultural perspective | mind-altering substances | mind-altering substances | habit-forming substances | habit-forming substances | global trade | global trade | sugar | sugar | opium | opium | cocaine | cocaine | capitalism | capitalism | alcohol | alcohol | alcohol abuse | alcohol abuse | LSD | LSD | Prozac | Prozac | war on drugs | war on drugs | tobacco | tobacco | drug laws | drug laws | STS.062 | STS.062 | 21A.344 | 21A.344

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-2 Expository Writing - Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about Food and Culture (MIT) 21W.730-2 Expository Writing - Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about Food and Culture (MIT)

Description

"Civilization is mostly the story of how seeds, meats, and ways to cook them travel from place to place." - Adam Gopnik, "What's Cooking.""A significant part of the pleasure of eating is in one's accurate consciousness of the lives and the world from which food comes." - Wendell Berry, "The Pleasures of Eating."If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. The aroma of turkey roasting or the taste of green tea can be a portal to memories, while too many Big Macs can clog our arteries. The chef is an artist, yet those who pick oranges or process meat may be little more than slaves. In this class, we will explore many of the fascinating iss "Civilization is mostly the story of how seeds, meats, and ways to cook them travel from place to place." - Adam Gopnik, "What's Cooking.""A significant part of the pleasure of eating is in one's accurate consciousness of the lives and the world from which food comes." - Wendell Berry, "The Pleasures of Eating."If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. The aroma of turkey roasting or the taste of green tea can be a portal to memories, while too many Big Macs can clog our arteries. The chef is an artist, yet those who pick oranges or process meat may be little more than slaves. In this class, we will explore many of the fascinating iss

Subjects

Expository | Expository | writing | writing | food | food | thought | thought | life | life | symbol | symbol | it earth | it earth | families | families | cultures | cultures | The aroma of turkey memories | The aroma of turkey memories | chef | chef | artist | artist | family meals | family meals | art | art | science | science | cooking | cooking | fair trade | fair trade | eating disorders | eating disorders | Fast Food Nation | Fast Food Nation | films | films | videos | videos | personal narratives | personal narratives | essays | essays | research | research | workshop. | workshop.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.54 International Trade (MIT) 14.54 International Trade (MIT)

Description

The course will help us understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. The subject is one of the oldest fields in economics and is extremely topical at the moment, with the ongoing debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the large current account deficits of the US, the prospects for exchange rates, and the calls for a new global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina. In the course we will both cover the basic tools and some topics of current interest. The course will help us understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. The subject is one of the oldest fields in economics and is extremely topical at the moment, with the ongoing debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the large current account deficits of the US, the prospects for exchange rates, and the calls for a new global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina. In the course we will both cover the basic tools and some topics of current interest.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | international | international | trade | trade | goods | goods | countries | countries | savings | savings | investments | investments | international finance | international finance | globalization | globalization | free trade | free trade | t deficits | t deficits | United States | United States | exchange rates | exchange rates | financial crises | financial crises | East Asia | East Asia | Argentina | Argentina

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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International Relations (MIT) International Relations (MIT)

Description

This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior.

Subjects

globalization | globalization | migration | migration | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | environment | environment | public policy | public policy | transnational organization | transnational organization | sustainable development | sustainable development | global change | global change | government | government | technology | technology | security | security | civil society | civil society | political theory | political theory | theory | theory | policy | policy | emergent structures | emergent structures | processes | processes | flows | flows | goods | goods | services | services | national boundaries | national boundaries | international trade | international trade | immigration | immigration | international policies | international policies | macro-level | macro-level | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | comparative politics | comparative politics | integration | integration | national economies | national economies | IR | IR | IPE | IPE | sovereignty | sovereignty | inter-state relations | inter-state relations | supra-state | supra-state | non-state | non-state | narrow globalization | narrow globalization | comlex view | comlex view | international conflict | international conflict | domestic politics | domestic politics | international politics | international politics | population movements | population movements | macro-level behavior | macro-level behavior | complex view | complex view

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT) 17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics. This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics.

Subjects

security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security | security | sustainability | sustainability | international relations | international relations | comparative approaches | comparative approaches | constraints | constraints | options | options | strategies | strategies | policy choice | policy choice | developing and industrial nations | developing and industrial nations | decision | decision | trade-offs | trade-offs | inter-temporal effects | inter-temporal effects | technology | technology | design systems | design systems

License

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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A General history of trade: and especially consider'd as it respects the British commerce, as well at home, as to all parts of the world. With essays upon the improvement of our trade in particular. A General history of trade: and especially consider'd as it respects the British commerce, as well at home, as to all parts of the world. With essays upon the improvement of our trade in particular.

Description

ebook version of A General history of trade: and especially consider'd as it respects the British commerce, as well at home, as to all parts of the world. With essays upon the improvement of our trade in particular. ebook version of A General history of trade: and especially consider'd as it respects the British commerce, as well at home, as to all parts of the world. With essays upon the improvement of our trade in particular.

Subjects

kind | kind | Commerce | Commerce | Foreign trade promotion -- England | Foreign trade promotion -- England | Great Britain -- Commerce | Great Britain -- Commerce | Periodicals -- 18th century. -- England | Periodicals -- 18th century. -- England | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

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3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT) 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more. As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more.

Subjects

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | thermoforming | thermoforming | investment casting | investment casting | powder processing | powder processing | three-dimensional printing | three-dimensional printing | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | project management | project management | communications and computer skills | communications and computer skills | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

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14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT) 14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second of a two-part sequence of courses in labor economics. The course sequence is also open to qualified students in related fields and classes may be taken individually or out of sequence. This part of the sequence is principally concerned with issues relating to the determinants of the wage and salary distribution. The first half is organized around topics in wage determination, which are of particular interest for current research and policy and culminates with a focus on recent debates about the increasing dispersion of wage and salary income. The second half of the course is focused on labor market institutions and technological changes, and relates the debate about the income distribution to other major changes in the structure and texture of advanced industrial societi This is the second of a two-part sequence of courses in labor economics. The course sequence is also open to qualified students in related fields and classes may be taken individually or out of sequence. This part of the sequence is principally concerned with issues relating to the determinants of the wage and salary distribution. The first half is organized around topics in wage determination, which are of particular interest for current research and policy and culminates with a focus on recent debates about the increasing dispersion of wage and salary income. The second half of the course is focused on labor market institutions and technological changes, and relates the debate about the income distribution to other major changes in the structure and texture of advanced industrial societi

Subjects

labor | labor | economics | economics | trade unions | trade unions | wage differentials | wage differentials | international trade | international trade | wage and salary distribution | wage and salary distribution | wage determination | wage determination | increasing dispersion of wage and salary income | increasing dispersion of wage and salary income | labor market institutions | labor market institutions | technological changes | technological changes | income distribution | income distribution | United States and other advanced industrial countries | United States and other advanced industrial countries | moral hazard and agency | moral hazard and agency | Static single agent models | Static single agent models | Intrinsic motivation | Intrinsic motivation | Multiple tasks | Multiple tasks | Multiple agents | Multiple agents | Dynamic agency | Dynamic agency | Efficiency wages | Efficiency wages | Employer Wage Differentials | Employer Wage Differentials | Industry and firm size differentials | Industry and firm size differentials | Compensating differentials | Compensating differentials | Discrimination and Differentials by Race and Gender | Discrimination and Differentials by Race and Gender | Changes in the Wage Structure and Inequality | Changes in the Wage Structure and Inequality | Worker Motivation and Behavior | Worker Motivation and Behavior | Social Dimensions of the Labor Force | Social Dimensions of the Labor Force | Social class | Social class | Social capital | Social capital | Immigration | Immigration | Quasi-unions in the New Labor Market | Quasi-unions in the New Labor Market | Labor market regulations in a global economy | Labor market regulations in a global economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.763J Manufacturing System and Supply Chain Design (MIT) 15.763J Manufacturing System and Supply Chain Design (MIT)

Description

15.763J focuses on decision making for system design, as it arises in manufacturing systems and supply chains. Students are exposed to frameworks and models for structuring the key issues and trade-offs. The class presents and discusses new opportunities, issues and concepts introduced by the internet and e-commerce. It also introduces various models, methods and software tools for logistics network design, capacity planning and flexibility, make-buy, and integration with product development. Industry applications and cases illustrate concepts and challenges. The class is recommended for anyone concentrating in Operations Management, and is a second half-term subject. 15.763J focuses on decision making for system design, as it arises in manufacturing systems and supply chains. Students are exposed to frameworks and models for structuring the key issues and trade-offs. The class presents and discusses new opportunities, issues and concepts introduced by the internet and e-commerce. It also introduces various models, methods and software tools for logistics network design, capacity planning and flexibility, make-buy, and integration with product development. Industry applications and cases illustrate concepts and challenges. The class is recommended for anyone concentrating in Operations Management, and is a second half-term subject.

Subjects

15.763 | 15.763 | 1.274 | 1.274 | ESD.268 | ESD.268 | supply chain strategies | supply chain strategies | companies | companies | supply chain components | supply chain components | concepts and models | concepts and models | key tradeoffs and phenomena | key tradeoffs and phenomena | risk pooling and inventory placement | risk pooling and inventory placement | integrated planning and collaboration | integrated planning and collaboration | information sharing | information sharing | supply chain analysis and optimization | supply chain analysis and optimization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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