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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Drama | Drama | Writing | Writing | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Brecht | Brecht | Nabokov | Nabokov | Heller | Heller | Chaucer | Chaucer | Milton | Milton | Allegory | Allegory | Satire | Satire | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature | tales | tales | satirical paintnigs | satirical paintnigs | films | films | comedies | comedies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.486 20th Century Drama (MIT) 21L.486 20th Century Drama (MIT)

Description

In this course we will sample the range of mainstream and experimental drama that has been composed during the past century. Half of these plays are now acknowledged to be influential "classics" of modern drama; the other half are prize-winning contemporary plays that have broken new ground. We will study them both as distinguished writing and as scripts for performance. Moreover, all of these plays are historical: some draw their subject matter from past centuries, while others convey a sense of how contemporary events are informed by and located within a larger historical frame. During the first century of film, television, and computers, it seems that writers for the theater have been especially attuned to the relationships between past and present, in their art and in society In this course we will sample the range of mainstream and experimental drama that has been composed during the past century. Half of these plays are now acknowledged to be influential "classics" of modern drama; the other half are prize-winning contemporary plays that have broken new ground. We will study them both as distinguished writing and as scripts for performance. Moreover, all of these plays are historical: some draw their subject matter from past centuries, while others convey a sense of how contemporary events are informed by and located within a larger historical frame. During the first century of film, television, and computers, it seems that writers for the theater have been especially attuned to the relationships between past and present, in their art and in society

Subjects

modern plays | modern plays | Shaw | Shaw | O'Neill | O'Neill | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Williams | Williams | Soyinka | Soyinka | Churchill | Churchill | Wilson | Wilson | Friel | Friel | Stoppard | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Deveare Smith | Kushner | Kushner | performance | performance | sociopolitical | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | aesthetic contexts | theater | theater | multimedia | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT) 21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia. This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | modern plays | Shaw | Shaw | Pirandello | Pirandello | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Williams | Williams | Soyinka | Soyinka | Hwang | Hwang | Churchill | Churchill | Wilson | Wilson | Frayn | Frayn | Stoppard | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Deveare Smith | Kushner | Kushner | performance | performance | sociopolitical | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | aesthetic contexts | theater | theater | multimedia | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT) 21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th 21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th

Subjects

21G.031 | 21G.031 | 4.608 | 4.608 | avante garde | avante garde | kulturindustrie | kulturindustrie | germany | germany | asia | asia | latin america | latin america | africa | africa | europe | europe | culture | culture | consumer | consumer | history | history | politics | politics | Adorno | Adorno | Aragon | Aragon | Bataille | Bataille | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Breton | Breton | B?rger | B?rger | Duchamp | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Eisenstein | Ernst | Ernst | J?nger | J?nger | Greenberg | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Kandinsky | Malevich | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Mayakovsky | Tzara | Tzara | cinema | cinema | movies | movies | film | film | music | music | literature | literature | French culture | French culture | German culture | German culture | 20th century | 20th century | twentieth century | twentieth century | surrealism | surrealism | dadaism | dadaism | art history | art history | France | France | art movements | art movements | futurism | futurism | 21F.031J | 21F.031J | 21F.031 | 21F.031

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Culture: Madness, Murder, Mysteries (MIT) Culture: Madness, Murder, Mysteries (MIT)

Description

This course provides the opportunity to discuss, orally and in writing, cultural, ethical, and social issues on a stylistically sophisticated level. It explores representative and influential works from the nineteenth century to the present, through literary texts (prose, drama, poetry), radio plays, art, film, and architecture, as well as investigates topics such as the human and the machine, science and ethics, representation of memory, and issues of good and evil. Taught in German. This course provides the opportunity to discuss, orally and in writing, cultural, ethical, and social issues on a stylistically sophisticated level. It explores representative and influential works from the nineteenth century to the present, through literary texts (prose, drama, poetry), radio plays, art, film, and architecture, as well as investigates topics such as the human and the machine, science and ethics, representation of memory, and issues of good and evil. Taught in German.

Subjects

German | German | language | language | literature | literature | culture | culture | E. T. A. Hoffmann | E. T. A. Hoffmann | "Das Fräulein von Scuderi | " | "Das Fräulein von Scuderi | " | Annette von Droste-Hülshoff | Annette von Droste-Hülshoff | "Die Judenbuche | " | "Die Judenbuche | " | Gerhart Hauptmann | Gerhart Hauptmann | "Bahnwärter Thiel | " | "Bahnwärter Thiel | " | Bertolt Brecht | Bertolt Brecht | Kurt Weill | Kurt Weill | Die Dreigroschenoper | Die Dreigroschenoper | Friedrich Dürrenmatt | Friedrich Dürrenmatt | Die Physiker | Die Physiker | Jakob Arjouni | Jakob Arjouni | Happy Birthday | Happy Birthday | Türke | Türke | Tom Tykwer | Tom Tykwer | Das Parfum: Die Geschichte eines Mörders | Das Parfum: Die Geschichte eines Mörders

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21F.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in the fields of poet

Subjects

avante garde | kulturindustrie | germany | asia | latin america | africa | europe | culture | consumer | history | politics | Adorno | Aragon | Bataille | Beckett | Brecht | Breton | B?rger | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Ernst | J?nger | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Tzara | cinema | movies | film | music | literature | French culture | German culture | 20th century | twentieth century | surrealism | dadaism | art history | France | art movements | futurism | 21F.031 | 4.608

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | Shaw | Pirandello | Beckett | Brecht | Williams | Soyinka | Hwang | Churchill | Wilson | Frayn | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Kushner | performance | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | theater | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21F.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in the fields of poet

Subjects

avante garde | kulturindustrie | germany | asia | latin america | africa | europe | culture | consumer | history | politics | Adorno | Aragon | Bataille | Beckett | Brecht | Breton | B?rger | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Ernst | J?nger | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Tzara | cinema | movies | film | music | literature | French culture | German culture | 20th century | twentieth century | surrealism | dadaism | art history | France | art movements | futurism | 21F.031 | 4.608

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Drama | Writing | Shakespeare | Twain | Wilde | Brecht | Nabokov | Heller | Chaucer | Milton | Allegory | Satire | comic | funny | jokes | literature | tales | satirical paintnigs | films | comedies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.486 20th Century Drama (MIT)

Description

In this course we will sample the range of mainstream and experimental drama that has been composed during the past century. Half of these plays are now acknowledged to be influential "classics" of modern drama; the other half are prize-winning contemporary plays that have broken new ground. We will study them both as distinguished writing and as scripts for performance. Moreover, all of these plays are historical: some draw their subject matter from past centuries, while others convey a sense of how contemporary events are informed by and located within a larger historical frame. During the first century of film, television, and computers, it seems that writers for the theater have been especially attuned to the relationships between past and present, in their art and in society

Subjects

modern plays | Shaw | O'Neill | Beckett | Brecht | Williams | Soyinka | Churchill | Wilson | Friel | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Kushner | performance | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | theater | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | Shaw | Pirandello | Beckett | Brecht | Williams | Soyinka | Hwang | Churchill | Wilson | Frayn | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Kushner | performance | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | theater | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Culture: Madness, Murder, Mysteries (MIT)

Description

This course provides the opportunity to discuss, orally and in writing, cultural, ethical, and social issues on a stylistically sophisticated level. It explores representative and influential works from the nineteenth century to the present, through literary texts (prose, drama, poetry), radio plays, art, film, and architecture, as well as investigates topics such as the human and the machine, science and ethics, representation of memory, and issues of good and evil. Taught in German.

Subjects

German | language | literature | culture | E. T. A. Hoffmann | ulein von Scuderi | " | lshoff | "Die Judenbuche | " | Gerhart Hauptmann | rter Thiel | " | Bertolt Brecht | Kurt Weill | Die Dreigroschenoper | rrenmatt | Die Physiker | Jakob Arjouni | Happy Birthday | rke | Tom Tykwer | rders

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th

Subjects

21G.031 | 4.608 | avante garde | kulturindustrie | germany | asia | latin america | africa | europe | culture | consumer | history | politics | Adorno | Aragon | Bataille | Beckett | Brecht | Breton | B?rger | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Ernst | J?nger | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Tzara | cinema | movies | film | music | literature | French culture | German culture | 20th century | twentieth century | surrealism | dadaism | art history | France | art movements | futurism | 21F.031J | 21F.031

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

This course is a study of the history of theater art and practice from its origins to the modern period, including its roles in non-western cultures. Special attention is given to the relationship between the literary and performative dimensions of drama, and the relationship between drama and its cultural context.

Subjects

drama | Brecht | modern theatre | Octoroon | Elam | Cixous | Hroswitha | Boucicault | Trifles | Aristotle | Poetics | Sophocles | Oedipus | Euripides | Medea | Dulcitius | York Crucifixion | Kan'ami | Matsukaze | Japan | Zeami | Calderon | Life is a Dream | A Doll's House | Modern Europe | Churchill | Cloud Nine | Street Scene | Treadwell | Machinal | Fires in the Mirror | Anna Deavere Smith | Gao | The Other Shore | realism | semiotics | Western Origins | England | America | performance art | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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