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21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. The colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact are examined. Readings include writings of the period by Winthrop, Paine, Jefferson, Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and Lincoln. This course focuses on a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. The colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact are examined. Readings include writings of the period by Winthrop, Paine, Jefferson, Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and Lincoln.

Subjects

A basic history of American social | economic | and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War | A basic history of American social | economic | and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War | colonial heritages of Spanish and British America | colonial heritages of Spanish and British America | the American Revolution and its impact | the American Revolution and its impact | the establishment and growth of the new nation | the establishment and growth of the new nation | the Civil War | its background | character | and impact | the Civil War | its background | character | and impact | writings of the period by Winthrop | Paine | Jefferson | Madison | W. H. Garrison | G. Fitzhugh | H. B. Stowe | and Lincoln | writings of the period by Winthrop | Paine | Jefferson | Madison | W. H. Garrison | G. Fitzhugh | H. B. Stowe | and Lincoln

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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An American Constitutional History Course for Non American Students An American Constitutional History Course for Non American Students

Description

This course provides an overview of the American Constitutional History, and it is aimed to Law students primarily in countries outside of the Anglo-Saxon legal system. This course provides an overview of the American Constitutional History, and it is aimed to Law students primarily in countries outside of the Anglo-Saxon legal system.

Subjects

New Deal | New Deal | Colonial Origins | Colonial Origins | Reconstruction Era | Reconstruction Era | Civil Rights | Civil Rights | Historia del Derecho y de las Instituciones | Historia del Derecho y de las Instituciones | Progressive Era | Progressive Era | American Constitutional History | American Constitutional History | Process of Federation | Process of Federation | Civil War | Civil War | Grado en Derecho | Grado en Derecho | American Constitutionalism | American Constitutionalism | First Changes to the Constitution | First Changes to the Constitution | Constitutions of the Revolution | Constitutions of the Revolution | 2012 | 2012

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.235 Metropolis: History of New York City (MIT) 21H.235 Metropolis: History of New York City (MIT)

Description

Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. —Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other citie Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. —Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other citie

Subjects

New York City | New York City | metropolis | metropolis | Harlem | Harlem | Bronx | Bronx | Brooklyn | Brooklyn | Queens | Queens | Long Island | Long Island | Manhattan | Manhattan | gay society | gay society | New Amsterdam | New Amsterdam | working class | working class | Haudenosaunee | Haudenosaunee | sex work | sex work | Chinatown | Chinatown | Tammany Hall | Tammany Hall | race relations | race relations | Civil War | Civil War | immigration | immigration | organized crime | organized crime | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | urban planning | urban planning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln. This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subjects

American colonies | American colonies | Civil War | Civil War | Spanish colonization | Spanish colonization | British empire | British empire | American Revolution | American Revolution | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | U.S. Constitution | U.S. Constitution | ratification | ratification | secession | secession | Bill of Rights | Bill of Rights | John Winthrop | John Winthrop | Thomas Paine | Thomas Paine | Thomas Jefferson | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | James Madison | William H. Garrison | William H. Garrison | George Fitzhugh | George Fitzhugh | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Abraham Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | Andrew Jackson | Andrew Jackson | George Mason | George Mason | abolition | abolition | Federalism | Federalism | slavery | slavery | Constitutional Convention | Constitutional Convention

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.116J The Civil War and Reconstruction (MIT) 21H.116J The Civil War and Reconstruction (MIT)

Description

Although attention will be devoted to the causes and long-term consequences of the Civil War, this class will focus primarily on the war years (1861-1865) with special emphasis on the military and technological aspects of the conflict. Four questions, long debated by historians, will receive close scrutiny: What caused the war? Why did the North win the war? Could the South have won? To what extent is the Civil War America's "defining moment"? Although attention will be devoted to the causes and long-term consequences of the Civil War, this class will focus primarily on the war years (1861-1865) with special emphasis on the military and technological aspects of the conflict. Four questions, long debated by historians, will receive close scrutiny: What caused the war? Why did the North win the war? Could the South have won? To what extent is the Civil War America's "defining moment"?

Subjects

21H.116 | 21H.116 | STS.029 | STS.029 | History | History | Civil War | Civil War | Reconstruction | Reconstruction | causes | causes | consequences | consequences | 1861-1865 | 1861-1865 | military | military | technology | technology | North | North | South | South | Federal | Federal | Confederacy | Confederacy | soldiers | soldiers | Ken Burns | Ken Burns

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.102 The Emergence of Modern America 1865-Present (MIT) 21H.102 The Emergence of Modern America 1865-Present (MIT)

Description

This subject studies the changing structure of American politics, economics, and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. We will consider secondary historical accounts and primary documents to examine some of the key issues in the development of modern America: industrialization and urbanization; U.S. emergence as a global power; ideas about rights and equality; and the changing structures of gender, class, and race. This subject also examines the multiple answers that Americans gave to the question of what it means to be an American in the modern age. As a communications intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises. This subject studies the changing structure of American politics, economics, and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. We will consider secondary historical accounts and primary documents to examine some of the key issues in the development of modern America: industrialization and urbanization; U.S. emergence as a global power; ideas about rights and equality; and the changing structures of gender, class, and race. This subject also examines the multiple answers that Americans gave to the question of what it means to be an American in the modern age. As a communications intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises.

Subjects

America | America | politics | politics | economics | economics | society | society | post-Civil War | post-Civil War | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | global power | global power | equality | equality | gender | gender | class | class | race | race

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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American Society (MIT) American Society (MIT)

Description

Writing in the wake of the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman insisted that "the real war will never get in the books." Throughout American history, the experience of war has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. This subject examines how Americans have told the stories of modern war in history, literature, and popular culture, and interprets them in terms of changing ideas about American national identity. Writing in the wake of the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman insisted that "the real war will never get in the books." Throughout American history, the experience of war has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. This subject examines how Americans have told the stories of modern war in history, literature, and popular culture, and interprets them in terms of changing ideas about American national identity.

Subjects

Civil War | Civil War | war | war | citizenship | citizenship | representation | representation | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | literature | literature | national identity | national identity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT) 21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special

Subjects

history | history | art and science | art and science | art vs. science | art vs. science | history of science | history of science | religion | religion | natural philosophy | natural philosophy | mathematics | mathematics | literature | literature | church | church | cosmology | cosmology | physics | physics | philosphy | philosphy | astronomy | astronomy | alchemy | alchemy | chemistry | chemistry | plays | plays | theater history | theater history | cultural studies | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Ford | Ford | Tate | Tate | Behn | Behn | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | Burton | Burton | Hobbes | Hobbes | Boyle | Boyle | 17th century | 17th century | England | England | Scotland | Scotland | english history | english history | scottish history | scottish history | Britain | Britain | Charles I | Charles I | Charles II | Charles II | Cromwell | Cromwell | Jacobean era | Jacobean era | Caroline era | Caroline era | English Restoration | English Restoration | House of Stuart | House of Stuart | English Civil War | English Civil War | Early Modern English | Early Modern English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context. What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | 19th century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 1800s | 1800s | novel | novel | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | American authors | American authors | colonial America | colonial America | native American | native American | Puritan | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | Hobomok | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | authors | authors | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | Civil War | Civil War | Walt Whitman | Walt Whitman | gender | gender | race | race | social | social | political | political | realities | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between. This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between.

Subjects

Nineteenth-century | Nineteenth-century | American | American | authors | authors | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Martin Delany | Martin Delany | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | Dred | Dred | Frances E. W. Harper | Frances E. W. Harper | Charles Chesnutt | Charles Chesnutt | Civil War | Civil War | Pudd'nhead Wilson | Pudd'nhead Wilson | racial tensions | racial tensions | social | social | political | political | realities. | realities.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | engineering | engineering | hobbyist | hobbyist | communications | communications | Internet | Internet | machine age | machine age | Apollo program | Apollo program | biotechnology | biotechnology | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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American Society (MIT) American Society (MIT)

Description

Writing in the wake of the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman insisted that "the real war will never get in the books." Throughout American history, the experience of war has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. This subject examines how Americans have told the stories of modern war in history, literature, and popular culture, and interprets them in terms of changing ideas about American national identity. Writing in the wake of the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman insisted that "the real war will never get in the books." Throughout American history, the experience of war has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. This subject examines how Americans have told the stories of modern war in history, literature, and popular culture, and interprets them in terms of changing ideas about American national identity.

Subjects

Civil War | Civil War | war | war | citizenship | citizenship | representation | representation | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | literature | literature | national identity | national identity

License

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21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT) 21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT)

Description

In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people. In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subjects

modern Spain | modern Spain | Spanish Civil War | Spanish Civil War | Franco | Franco | censorship | censorship | regional autonomy | regional autonomy | Basque | Basque | Catalonia | Catalonia | Pedro Almodóvar | Pedro Almodóvar | educational reform | educational reform | feminism | feminism | magazines | magazines | newspapers | newspapers | films | films | television | television | fiction | fiction | Roman Catholic Church | Roman Catholic Church | Juan Carlos | Juan Carlos | constitution | constitution | reform | reform | revolution | revolution | democratic transition | democratic transition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT) 21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact. This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | renaissance | revolution | revolution | Europe | Europe | Italy | Italy | French Revolution | French Revolution | theology | theology | magic | magic | science | science | England | England | censorship | censorship | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Copernicus | Constantine | Constantine | printing | printing | rare books | rare books | paper-making | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | The Paraclesis | free will | free will | Luther | Luther | German Peasants War | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | radical reform movements | religion | religion | Menocchio | Menocchio | skepticism | skepticism | the occult | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | astrology | Cardano | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Newtonianism | Principia | Principia | The Encyclopedie | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | Diderot | d'Alembert | d'Alembert | metric system | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.640J The New Spain:1977-Present (MIT) 21L.640J The New Spain:1977-Present (MIT)

Description

In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: Sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people. In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: Sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subjects

modern Spain | modern Spain | Spanish Civil War | Spanish Civil War | Franco | Franco | censorship | censorship | regional autonomy | regional autonomy | Basque | Basque | Catalonia | Catalonia | Pedro Almodóvar | Pedro Almodóvar | educational reform | educational reform | feminism | feminism | magazines | magazines | newspapers | newspapers | films | films | television | television | fiction | fiction | Roman Catholic Church | Roman Catholic Church | Juan Carlos | Juan Carlos | constitution | constitution | reform | reform | revolution | revolution | democratic transition | democratic transition | José Ibáñez Martín | José Ibáñez Martín

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. The colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact are examined. Readings include writings of the period by Winthrop, Paine, Jefferson, Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and Lincoln.

Subjects

A basic history of American social | economic | and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War | colonial heritages of Spanish and British America | the American Revolution and its impact | the establishment and growth of the new nation | the Civil War | its background | character | and impact | writings of the period by Winthrop | Paine | Jefferson | Madison | W. H. Garrison | G. Fitzhugh | H. B. Stowe | and Lincoln

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT)

Description

In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subjects

modern Spain | Spanish Civil War | Franco | censorship | regional autonomy | Basque | Catalonia | óvar | educational reform | feminism | magazines | newspapers | films | television | fiction | Roman Catholic Church | Juan Carlos | constitution | reform | revolution | democratic transition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | Civil War | World War II | Cold War | industrialization | mass production | craftsmanship | transportation | Taylorism | aeronautics | systems approach | computers | control | automation | nature | popular culture | terrorism | engineering | hobbyist | communications | Internet | machine age | Apollo program | biotechnology | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.116J The Civil War and Reconstruction (MIT)

Description

Although attention will be devoted to the causes and long-term consequences of the Civil War, this class will focus primarily on the war years (1861-1865) with special emphasis on the military and technological aspects of the conflict. Four questions, long debated by historians, will receive close scrutiny: What caused the war? Why did the North win the war? Could the South have won? To what extent is the Civil War America's "defining moment"?

Subjects

21H.116 | STS.029 | History | Civil War | Reconstruction | causes | consequences | 1861-1865 | military | technology | North | South | Federal | Confederacy | soldiers | Ken Burns

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.102 The Emergence of Modern America 1865-Present (MIT)

Description

This subject studies the changing structure of American politics, economics, and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. We will consider secondary historical accounts and primary documents to examine some of the key issues in the development of modern America: industrialization and urbanization; U.S. emergence as a global power; ideas about rights and equality; and the changing structures of gender, class, and race. This subject also examines the multiple answers that Americans gave to the question of what it means to be an American in the modern age. As a communications intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises.

Subjects

America | politics | economics | society | post-Civil War | industrialization | urbanization | global power | equality | gender | class | race

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT)

Description

In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subjects

modern Spain | Spanish Civil War | Franco | censorship | regional autonomy | Basque | Catalonia | var | educational reform | feminism | magazines | newspapers | films | television | fiction | Roman Catholic Church | Juan Carlos | constitution | reform | revolution | democratic transition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Hobbes, Leviathan (Seeing and Knowing)

Description

Video and slides from Christina Hendricks' lecture on Hobbes' Leviathan in October 2015.

Subjects

lecture | powerpoint | Seeing and Knowing | video | C17th | English Civil War | Hobbes | Leviathan

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ca/deed.en_US

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