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21M.873 Theater Arts Topics (MIT) 21M.873 Theater Arts Topics (MIT)

Description

Directed practice in acting, directing, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production. Directed practice in acting, directing, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production.

Subjects

Acting; directing; design; theater; one-act; full length; pre-rehearsal; workshop; production; theater arts; directed practice; stagecraft; Dramashop; rehearsal; Anne Washburn; play; The Internationalist; Sonenberg; auditions; technical. | Acting; directing; design; theater; one-act; full length; pre-rehearsal; workshop; production; theater arts; directed practice; stagecraft; Dramashop; rehearsal; Anne Washburn; play; The Internationalist; Sonenberg; auditions; technical. | Acting; | Acting; | Acting | Acting | directing | directing | design | design | theater | theater | one-act | one-act | full length | full length | pre-rehearsal | pre-rehearsal | workshop | workshop | production | production | theater arts | theater arts | directed practice | directed practice | stagecraft | stagecraft | Dramashop | Dramashop | rehearsal | rehearsal | Anne Washburn | Anne Washburn | play | play | The Internationalist | The Internationalist | Sonenberg | Sonenberg | auditions | auditions | technical | technical

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Drama | Drama | Writing | Writing | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Brecht | Brecht | Nabokov | Nabokov | Heller | Heller | Chaucer | Chaucer | Milton | Milton | Allegory | Allegory | Satire | Satire | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature | tales | tales | satirical paintnigs | satirical paintnigs | films | films | comedies | comedies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The raigne of King Edvvard the Third The raigne of King Edvvard the Third

Description

ebook version of The raigne of King Edvvard the Third ebook version of The raigne of King Edvvard the Third

Subjects

kind | kind | Edward -- III | -- King of England | -- 1312-1377 -- Drama | Edward -- III | -- King of England | -- 1312-1377 -- Drama | Plays -- England -- 16th century | Plays -- England -- 16th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances. Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater. | theater.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic. This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Fiction | Drama | Drama | Poetry | Poetry | Joyce | Joyce | Yeats | Yeats | Bolger | Bolger | Beckett | Beckett | O'Brien | O'Brien | Trevor | Trevor | Lavin | Lavin | McGahern | McGahern | Dorcey | Dorcey | Doyle | Doyle | Berkeley | Berkeley | Friel | Friel | Heaney | Heaney | Crotty | Crotty | Boland | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Meehan | Carr | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.873 Theater Arts Topics - Suburbia (MIT) 21M.873 Theater Arts Topics - Suburbia (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. Directed practice in acting, production, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production. Consult Theater Arts Office. Includes directed practice in stagecraft. Dramashop rehearses a production of Eric Bogosian's play "subUrbia" for presentation the first two weekends in February. Visiting artist, David R. Gammons, directs. Approximately 10 roles filled by auditions. Students can receive up to six credits for acting or technical positions. Schedule of rehearsals to be arranged, but actors should be available during the afternoon. Students must be available for performances in early February. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. Directed practice in acting, production, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production. Consult Theater Arts Office. Includes directed practice in stagecraft. Dramashop rehearses a production of Eric Bogosian's play "subUrbia" for presentation the first two weekends in February. Visiting artist, David R. Gammons, directs. Approximately 10 roles filled by auditions. Students can receive up to six credits for acting or technical positions. Schedule of rehearsals to be arranged, but actors should be available during the afternoon. Students must be available for performances in early February. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period

Subjects

Acting | Acting | directing | directing | design | design | theater | theater | one-act | one-act | full length | full length | pre-rehearsal | pre-rehearsal | workshop | workshop | production | production | theater arts | theater arts | directed practice | directed practice | stagecraft | stagecraft | Dramashop | Dramashop | rehearsal | rehearsal | subUrbia | subUrbia | David Gammons | David Gammons | Eric Bogosian | Eric Bogosian | play | play | auditions | auditions | technical | technical | audio | audio | video | video | images | images

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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King Lear to In the loop : fiction and British politics King Lear to In the loop : fiction and British politics

Description

On 11 December 2009, Nottingham University's Centre for British Politics held a conference at the British Academy that drew together politicians, writers and academics to explore the interaction of British politics and fiction. In addition to the conference several video interviews were conducted with some of the speakers on the day. In this interview taken at the Fiction and British Politics Conference in London, Research Fellow - Matthew Bailey - answers a question posed by Hazel Blears. Could a West Wing-styled drama improve the standing of British politicians? Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Dr Matthew Bailey, Research Fellow, The Centre for British Politics, The University of Nottingham Dr Matthew Bailey has published work on a variety of topics regard On 11 December 2009, Nottingham University's Centre for British Politics held a conference at the British Academy that drew together politicians, writers and academics to explore the interaction of British politics and fiction. In addition to the conference several video interviews were conducted with some of the speakers on the day. In this interview taken at the Fiction and British Politics Conference in London, Research Fellow - Matthew Bailey - answers a question posed by Hazel Blears. Could a West Wing-styled drama improve the standing of British politicians? Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Dr Matthew Bailey, Research Fellow, The Centre for British Politics, The University of Nottingham Dr Matthew Bailey has published work on a variety of topics regard

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Politics | Politics | Fiction | Fiction | Political Fiction | Political Fiction | Political Drama | Political Drama | Political Dipiction | Political Dipiction | Political Representation | Political Representation | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Música y Arquitectura: Espacios y paisajes sonoros Música y Arquitectura: Espacios y paisajes sonoros

Description

“Música y Arquitectura: Espacios y Paisajes Sonoros” se centra en el análisis de la percepción sonora de la arquitectura y de la ciudad, de sus características y de su evolución a través de la historia. Se utilizará como referencia la historia de la música, del teatro y del cine para destacar la importancia que tienen todos sentidos en la percepción del espacio. El sonido y su influencia en el diseño de los espacios arquitectónicos y urbanos, está directamente relacionado con la experiencia de la música y la palabra. Se aborda también una introducción a la teoría de los paisajes sonoros ("soundscapes") y la ecología acústica, introducidos por el compositor canadiense R. Murray Schafer para describir críticamente nuestro medio ambiente como un campo humano-ecoló “Música y Arquitectura: Espacios y Paisajes Sonoros” se centra en el análisis de la percepción sonora de la arquitectura y de la ciudad, de sus características y de su evolución a través de la historia. Se utilizará como referencia la historia de la música, del teatro y del cine para destacar la importancia que tienen todos sentidos en la percepción del espacio. El sonido y su influencia en el diseño de los espacios arquitectónicos y urbanos, está directamente relacionado con la experiencia de la música y la palabra. Se aborda también una introducción a la teoría de los paisajes sonoros ("soundscapes") y la ecología acústica, introducidos por el compositor canadiense R. Murray Schafer para describir críticamente nuestro medio ambiente como un campo humano-ecoló

Subjects

Puesta en escena | Puesta en escena | Cine | Cine | Paisajes Sonoros | Paisajes Sonoros | Ópera | Ópera | Ecología acústica | Ecología acústica | Sala de Conciertos | Sala de Conciertos | Sonido | Sonido | Espacio Escénico | Espacio Escénico | Escenografia | Escenografia | Espacios Sonoros | Espacios Sonoros | Arquitecturas efímeras | Arquitecturas efímeras | Drama | Drama | Expresión Gráfica Arquitectónica | Expresión Gráfica Arquitectónica | Escenario | Escenario | Audiovisión | Audiovisión | Acústica | Acústica | Audición | Audición | Espacio Escenográfico | Espacio Escenográfico | Objetos sonoros | Objetos sonoros | Ruido | Ruido | Arte sonoro | Arte sonoro | Películas | Películas | Teatro | Teatro | Espectáculo | Espectáculo | Ciudad | Ciudad | Vanguardias artísticas | Vanguardias artísticas | Auditorio | Auditorio

License

Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill (MIT)

Description

What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do we need to know that is not information? If words circulate, can meaning be stable? What is the relationship between pleasure and responsibility? What are the politics of stagecraft in our time What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do we need to know that is not information? If words circulate, can meaning be stable? What is the relationship between pleasure and responsibility? What are the politics of stagecraft in our time

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Drama | Drama | Stoppard | Stoppard | Churchill | Churchill | Play | Play | British | British | Text analysis | Text analysis | Stagecraft | Stagecraft | Writer | Writer | History | History | Politics | Politics | Culture | Culture | Performance | Performance | Comedy | Comedy | 21M.616 | 21M.616

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.873 Theater Arts Topics (MIT)

Description

Directed practice in acting, directing, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production.

Subjects

Acting; directing; design; theater; one-act; full length; pre-rehearsal; workshop; production; theater arts; directed practice; stagecraft; Dramashop; rehearsal; Anne Washburn; play; The Internationalist; Sonenberg; auditions; technical. | Acting; | Acting | directing | design | theater | one-act | full length | pre-rehearsal | workshop | production | theater arts | directed practice | stagecraft | Dramashop | rehearsal | Anne Washburn | play | The Internationalist | Sonenberg | auditions | technical

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill (MIT)

Description

What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do we need to know that is not information? If words circulate, can meaning be stable? What is the relationship between pleasure and responsibility? What are the politics of stagecraft in our time

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Drama | Stoppard | Churchill | Play | British | Text analysis | Stagecraft | Writer | History | Politics | Culture | Performance | Comedy | 21M.616

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Drama | Poetry | Joyce | Yeats | Bolger | Beckett | O'Brien | Trevor | Lavin | McGahern | Dorcey | Doyle | Berkeley | Friel | Heaney | Crotty | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Chris Difford Guest Lecture "Cool for Cats..."

Description

On Thursday 19 November, double Ivor Novello Award winner Chris Difford delivered on song writing to a full lecture theatre. It was a moment to remember for all in attendance, with one member of staff commenting, "I've worked here for sixteen years and that was the best hour yet". Chris' anecdotes and advice were especially appreciated by the song writers and music production students in the audience. With over 25 years of experience, and a single-minded attitude, Chris has become one of the most successful lyricists of recent times. He first found success as a member of Squeeze with their hit singles including, Cool for Cats, Black Coffee In Bed, Up the Junction and Hourglass. As a young boy, Chris wrote poetry, inventing stories that would allow him to exercise his vivid imagination

Subjects

ukoer | song writing | music production | Dance | Drama and Music | Creative Arts and Design | design | W000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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INN Guest Lecture - The Whiskas Story

Description

Sustainability of Artist as Producer and Performer', which has enabled him to creatively produce music for artists including Mi Mye and Duels and he is currently working on his solo project, Honour Before Glory.

Subjects

ukoer | music promotition | music industry | record label | Dance | Drama and Music | Creative Arts and Design | design | W000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Innovation North Research Conference 2006 Ian Gibson

Description

A running stream approach to music technology

Subjects

ukoer | innovation north | music technology | Dance | Drama and Music | Creative Arts and Design | design | W000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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JAMES Conference - Dennis Weinreich Keynote

Description

JAMES (Joint Audio Media Education Services) Conference - Dennis Weinreich Keynote

Subjects

ukoer | james | audio media | Dance | Drama and Music | Creative Arts and Design | design | W000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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JAMES Conference - Steve Lawson Keynote

Description

JAMES (Joint Audio Media Education Services) Conference - Steve Lawson Keynote

Subjects

ukoer | james | audio media | Dance | Drama and Music | Creative Arts and Design | design | W000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Prof. Nick Childs - 'History of Brass Bands - The Golden Period'

Description

The repertoire played by bands has altered radically over many years. However, commissioning bodies have always been governed by a desire to attract the leading mainstream composers of the day to write original material for the medium. The so-called 'Golden Period', spanning the period between the Great Depression and the Second World War, encapsulates this ambition at its most successful. A sequence of seminal works, by John Ireland, Gustav Holst, Granville Bantock, Herbert Howells, and Sir Edward Elgar revitalised the repertory and placed amateur musicians in a place of honour within the British musical establishment. In an illustrated lecture, Prof. Nicholas Childs and the Black Dyke Band place this music in its wider context, from the production of the first original band composition

Subjects

ukoer | brass band | black dyke band | compositions | music history | Dance | Drama and Music | Creative Arts and Design | design | W000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Ray Russell Inaugural Lecture "A life in music..."

Description

Visiting Professor, Ray Russell delivered his inaugural lecture on Thursday 25 March in Gandhi Hall. Ray's lecture, entitled 'A Life in Music' covered highlights from his 40-year career in the music industry ranging from his first professional job with the John Barry Seven to working with Tina Turner and on classic television theme tunes including Bergerac and A Touch of Frost. The lecture was delivered in a unique format that saw Ray backed by a band including his sons, Charlie and George, on bass and drums and his friend, Geoff Castle, on keyboards, to perform various pieces from throughout Ray's career. Ray's warm and humorous delivery was full of interesting and funny anecdotes and the audience of students, staff and industry guests thoroughly enjoyed the evening.

Subjects

ukoer | music industry | Dance | Drama and Music | Creative Arts and Design | design | W000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Online survey of staff ICT skills using the training needs analysis (TNA) tool at Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSAMD)

Description

As part of their aim for excellence, RSAMD started a Post graduate Certificate (PG Cert) in Learning and Teaching in Higher Arts Education for staff in 2008. Accredited by the Higher Education Academy and awarded by RSAMD, the introduction of the Pg Cert had a really positive effect on the staff in general, not just for the dozen or so staff in the first cohort. There was a marked change in people’s perception of using technology as a result of the positive and enlightened conversations which arose directly as a result of staff working towards this certification. While there had been a general understanding of the use of technology in learning and teaching, studying for the Pg Cert was like switching on a light. It influenced a more pedagogical, transformational approach to teaching and

Subjects

2009 | case studies | Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSAMD) | training needs analysis (TNA) | surveys | None

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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Using e-Portfolios to create a learning community and to support assessment and reflective practice at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (formerly the RSAMD)

Description

Creating a learning community and supporting assessment and reflective practice are key aims for those working in FE and HE. It is something staff at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (the RSAMD at the time of recording this case study) have been focusing on and using the ePortfolio tool, Mahara, to support. Staff and students have been making use of the opportunities to incorporate rich multi-media, to blog, upload videos of performances and more to enable reflection on practice, assess in more effective ways and foster inter-disciplinary engagement across the institution.

Subjects

2011 | case studies | Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSAMD) | Royal Conservatoire of Scotland | e-Assessment | Mahara | e-Portfolios | None

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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Music matters wiki at RSAMD

Description

Students at RSAMD who have chosen to study Community Music have to be skilled in documenting their practice, with the ability to analyse the processes they have used to createoriginal work, and to make this learning explicit. The Music Matters wiki has been developed to encourage staff, students and community partners to collaborate in the design of materials for performance and the documentation of work, using a range of media. As a result, they can now share their learning more widely with other colleagues within the RSAMD Community Music Community of Practice who have recognised the value of the wiki resources as reference material which can be used for continuing professional development training.

Subjects

2012 | wikis | case studies | Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSAMD) | Royal Conservatoire of Scotland | collaborative learning | Wikispaces | community music | music | work based placements | None

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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Citing your References in the MHRA Style

Description

A guide for English Literature and Drama students on how to use the MHRA referencing style

Subjects

Referencing MHRA Style English Drama Footnotes Quotations Bibliographies

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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