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17.508 The Rise and Fall of Democracy/ Regime Change (MIT) 17.508 The Rise and Fall of Democracy/ Regime Change (MIT)

Description

Coups, civil wars, revolutions, and peaceful transitions are the "real stuff" of political science. They show us why politics matters, and they highlight the consequences of political choices in times of institutional crisis. This course will help you understand why democracies emerge and why they die, from ancient times to the recent wave of democratization in Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, and the developing world. Few things are more dramatic than the collapse of a political system, whether through violent conflict or the peaceful negotiation of new political institutions. Explaining why regimes break down, why new ones emerge, and how these new regimes are consolidated are among the most important questions in political science. Not surprisingly, regime change has obsessed scholars Coups, civil wars, revolutions, and peaceful transitions are the "real stuff" of political science. They show us why politics matters, and they highlight the consequences of political choices in times of institutional crisis. This course will help you understand why democracies emerge and why they die, from ancient times to the recent wave of democratization in Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, and the developing world. Few things are more dramatic than the collapse of a political system, whether through violent conflict or the peaceful negotiation of new political institutions. Explaining why regimes break down, why new ones emerge, and how these new regimes are consolidated are among the most important questions in political science. Not surprisingly, regime change has obsessed scholars

Subjects

Coups | Coups | Civil war | Civil war | Revolutions | Revolutions | Institutional crisis | Institutional crisis | Democratization | Democratization | Southern Europe | Southern Europe | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | Developing world | Developing world

License

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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT) 11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | the proper relationship between business | government | government | and the public interest | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | CIS | CIS | Asia | Asia | business | business | public interest | public interest | economic growth | economic growth | equity | equity | cities | cities | institution-building | institution-building | institutions | institutions | liberalization | liberalization | privatization | privatization | entrepreneurs | entrepreneurs | private firms | private firms | law | law | property rights | property rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.342 Environmental Struggles (MIT) 21A.342 Environmental Struggles (MIT)

Description

This class explores the interrelationship between humans and natural environments. It does so by focusing on conflict over access to and use of the environment as well as ideas about "nature" in various parts of the world. This class explores the interrelationship between humans and natural environments. It does so by focusing on conflict over access to and use of the environment as well as ideas about "nature" in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | environment | environment | struggle | struggle | humans | humans | conflict | conflict | access | access | use | use | nature | nature | world | world | readings | readings | films | films | land rights | land rights | hunting | hunting | fishing | fishing | regulations | regulations | knowledge | knowledge | scientific | scientific | popular | popular | hazardous waste | hazardous waste | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | cultural | cultural | European thought | European thought | ethnographic | ethnographic | historical | historical | East Africa | East Africa | South Asia | South Asia | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | Latin America | Latin America | North America | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.666 Developmental Entrepreneurship (MIT) MAS.666 Developmental Entrepreneurship (MIT)

Description

This class surveys developmental entrepreneurship via case examples of both successful and failed businesses and generally grapples with deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. By drawing on live and historical cases, especially from South Asia, Africa, Latin America as well as Eastern Europe, China, and other developing regions, we seek to cover the broad spectrum of challenges and opportunities facing developmental entrepreneurs. Finally, we explore a range of established and emerging business models as well as new business opportunities enabled by developmental technologies developed in MIT labs and beyond. This class surveys developmental entrepreneurship via case examples of both successful and failed businesses and generally grapples with deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. By drawing on live and historical cases, especially from South Asia, Africa, Latin America as well as Eastern Europe, China, and other developing regions, we seek to cover the broad spectrum of challenges and opportunities facing developmental entrepreneurs. Finally, we explore a range of established and emerging business models as well as new business opportunities enabled by developmental technologies developed in MIT labs and beyond.

Subjects

developing nations | developing nations | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | management | management | technology | technology | population growth | population growth | poverty | poverty | innovation | innovation | social conscience | social conscience | humanitarian design | humanitarian design | low-cost technology | low-cost technology | distribution of technology | distribution of technology | case studies | case studies | business models | business models | products | products | services | services | developmental entrepreneurship | developmental entrepreneurship | South Asia | South Asia | Africa | Africa | Latin America | Latin America | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | China | China | developmental technologies | developmental technologies | grassroots entrepreneurship | grassroots entrepreneurship | microfinance | microfinance | financial services | financial services | developmental capital | developmental capital

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT) STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world. This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | complex interrelationships | complex interrelationships | humans | humans | natural environments | natural environments | conflict | conflict | access | access | land rights | land rights | hunting | hunting | fishing | fishing | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | scientific | scientific | popular | popular | knowledge | knowledge | biotechnology | biotechnology | hazardous waste | hazardous waste | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | environmental | environmental | stakes | stakes | forest | forest | agricultural | agricultural | marine | marine | urban | urban | cultural | cultural | historical | historical | power relationships | power relationships | local | local | national | national | international levels. nature | international levels. nature | European thought | European thought | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | ethnographic | ethnographic | East Africa | East Africa | South Asia | South Asia | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | North America | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Olympic Games and Eastern Europe

Description

This case study considers how the Olympic stage has been utilised as a key arena for the expression of competing dominant political ideologies in modern history.

Subjects

UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | cc-by | creative commons | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | The Olympics and Eastern Europe | Western Europe | Eastern Europe | doping | drugs | East Germany | Russia | Olympic Boycotts | Melbourne 1956 | Melbourne | Soviet invasion of Afghanistan | Afghanistan | Moscow | Moscow 1980 | Sochi 2014 | Sochi bid | Sochi | investment | funding | finance | protest | boycott | politics | political issues | conflict | oxb:060111:013cs | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | The Olympics Impact and Legacy

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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New Indicators of High-Level Corruption using Government Contracting Data: Examples from Eastern Europe

Description

Existing measures of corruption often suffer from bias and are too broad to guide policy or test theories. This paper proposes three new indirect indicators of high-level corruption in public procurement, using contract and organisation-level administrat The first is a composite score expressing the probability of corruption occurring in public procurement tenders based on the incidence of ?red flags? associated with barriers to competition and unusually high winner market share. The second is a binary variable marking companies whose public procurement market success depends on the government in power, generated by tracking companies? market volumes from before to after the government changes. The third is a binary variable marking those public procurement winners whose owners or Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

high-level corruption | indicators | government contracting data | Eastern Europe | high-level corruption | indicators | government contracting data | Eastern Europe | 2014-06-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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New Indicators of High-Level Corruption using Government Contracting Data: Examples from Eastern Europe (Slides)

Description

Existing measures of corruption often suffer from bias and are too broad to guide policy or test theories. This paper proposes three new indirect indicators of high-level corruption in public procurement, using contract and organisation-level administrat The first is a composite score expressing the probability of corruption occurring in public procurement tenders based on the incidence of ?red flags? associated with barriers to competition and unusually high winner market share. The second is a binary variable marking companies whose public procurement market success depends on the government in power, generated by tracking companies? market volumes from before to after the government changes. The third is a binary variable marking those public procurement winners whose owners or Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

high-level corruption | indicators | government contracting data | Eastern Europe | high-level corruption | indicators | government contracting data | Eastern Europe | 2014-06-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Olympic Games and Eastern Europe

Description

This case study considers how the Olympic stage has been utilised as a key arena for the expression of competing dominant political ideologies in modern history.

Subjects

UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | cc-by | creative commons | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | The Olympics and Eastern Europe | Western Europe | Eastern Europe | doping | drugs | East Germany | Russia | Olympic Boycotts | Melbourne 1956 | Melbourne | Soviet invasion of Afghanistan | Afghanistan | Moscow | Moscow 1980 | Sochi 2014 | Sochi bid | Sochi | investment | funding | finance | protest | boycott | politics | political issues | conflict | oxb:060111:013cs | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | The Olympics Impact and Legacy

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine

Description

Bloody clashes in front of the Ukrainian Parliament have reminded us about the EU’s tormented neighbour. Ultra-nationalists were not successful in the last parliamentary elections, but the tragic situation in Donbas has allowed them thrive. At stake this time were planned changes to the Ukrainian Constitution that envisaged a territorial decentralization as stipulated by the Minsk Agreement. For Ukrainian radicals these changes “imposed” from outside amount to a partition of their country. Is Ukraine unravelling? I do not think so, but much depends on Europe. The post The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine appeared first on Politics in Spires. Bloody clashes in front of the Ukrainian Parliament have reminded us about the EU’s tormented neighbour. Ultra-nationalists were not successful in the last parliamentary elections, but the tragic situation in Donbas has allowed them thrive. At stake this time were planned changes to the Ukrainian Constitution that envisaged a territorial decentralization as stipulated by the Minsk Agreement. For Ukrainian radicals these changes “imposed” from outside amount to a partition of their country. Is Ukraine unravelling? I do not think so, but much depends on Europe. The post The fatalistic predicament of Ukraine appeared first on Politics in Spires.

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | EuroMaidan | EuroMaidan | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union | Ukraine | Ukraine

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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Greece has become the EU’s third protectorate Greece has become the EU’s third protectorate

Description

The EU looks, walks and talks like an empire. After extending its borders into Central and Eastern Europe, the EU has just created its third protectorate in the Balkans. From now on Greece will effectively be run by the EU the way Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina already are. Empire is not a synonym of evil despite some bad historical connotations, especially from the colonial era. Power can be exercised in noble ways, and peripheries often prefer to be “conquered” than abandoned. However, the EU’s ambition to run dysfunctional countries by decree is doomed to fail and will represent yet another blow to the project of European integration. Formal involvement of the UN or the IMF in running the protectorates will not exonerate the EU. The post Greece has become the EU’s third protector The EU looks, walks and talks like an empire. After extending its borders into Central and Eastern Europe, the EU has just created its third protectorate in the Balkans. From now on Greece will effectively be run by the EU the way Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina already are. Empire is not a synonym of evil despite some bad historical connotations, especially from the colonial era. Power can be exercised in noble ways, and peripheries often prefer to be “conquered” than abandoned. However, the EU’s ambition to run dysfunctional countries by decree is doomed to fail and will represent yet another blow to the project of European integration. Formal involvement of the UN or the IMF in running the protectorates will not exonerate the EU. The post Greece has become the EU’s third protector

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | EuroMaidan | EuroMaidan | Europe | Europe | European Union | European Union | Ukraine | Ukraine

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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MAS.666 Developmental Entrepreneurship (MIT)

Description

This class surveys developmental entrepreneurship via case examples of both successful and failed businesses and generally grapples with deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. By drawing on live and historical cases, especially from South Asia, Africa, Latin America as well as Eastern Europe, China, and other developing regions, we seek to cover the broad spectrum of challenges and opportunities facing developmental entrepreneurs. Finally, we explore a range of established and emerging business models as well as new business opportunities enabled by developmental technologies developed in MIT labs and beyond.

Subjects

developing nations | entrepreneurship | management | technology | population growth | poverty | innovation | social conscience | humanitarian design | low-cost technology | distribution of technology | case studies | business models | products | services | developmental entrepreneurship | South Asia | Africa | Latin America | Eastern Europe | China | developmental technologies | grassroots entrepreneurship | microfinance | financial services | developmental capital

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.342 Environmental Struggles (MIT)

Description

This class explores the interrelationship between humans and natural environments. It does so by focusing on conflict over access to and use of the environment as well as ideas about "nature" in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | environment | struggle | humans | conflict | access | use | nature | world | readings | films | land rights | hunting | fishing | regulations | knowledge | scientific | popular | hazardous waste | social | economic | political | cultural | European thought | ethnographic | historical | East Africa | South Asia | Eastern Europe | Latin America | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.666 Developmental Entrepreneurship (MIT)

Description

This class surveys developmental entrepreneurship via case examples of both successful and failed businesses and generally grapples with deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. By drawing on live and historical cases, especially from South Asia, Africa, Latin America as well as Eastern Europe, China, and other developing regions, we seek to cover the broad spectrum of challenges and opportunities facing developmental entrepreneurs. Finally, we explore a range of established and emerging business models as well as new business opportunities enabled by developmental technologies developed in MIT labs and beyond.

Subjects

developing nations | entrepreneurship | management | technology | population growth | poverty | innovation | social conscience | humanitarian design | low-cost technology | distribution of technology | case studies | business models | products | services | developmental entrepreneurship | South Asia | Africa | Latin America | Eastern Europe | China | developmental technologies | grassroots entrepreneurship | microfinance | financial services | developmental capital

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | complex interrelationships | humans | natural environments | conflict | access | land rights | hunting | fishing | environmental regulations | scientific | popular | knowledge | biotechnology | hazardous waste | social | economic | political | environmental | stakes | forest | agricultural | marine | urban | cultural | historical | power relationships | local | national | international levels. nature | European thought | theoretical paradigms | ethnographic | East Africa | South Asia | Southeast Asia | Eastern Europe | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | government | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | CIS | Asia | business | public interest | economic growth | equity | cities | institution-building | institutions | liberalization | privatization | entrepreneurs | private firms | law | property rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.508 The Rise and Fall of Democracy/ Regime Change (MIT)

Description

Coups, civil wars, revolutions, and peaceful transitions are the "real stuff" of political science. They show us why politics matters, and they highlight the consequences of political choices in times of institutional crisis. This course will help you understand why democracies emerge and why they die, from ancient times to the recent wave of democratization in Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, and the developing world. Few things are more dramatic than the collapse of a political system, whether through violent conflict or the peaceful negotiation of new political institutions. Explaining why regimes break down, why new ones emerge, and how these new regimes are consolidated are among the most important questions in political science. Not surprisingly, regime change has obsessed scholars

Subjects

Coups | Civil war | Revolutions | Institutional crisis | Democratization | Southern Europe | Eastern Europe | Developing world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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How does European Union membership affect economic growth in newly joined members?

Description

Kadhraoui.

Subjects

economic growth | EU | Central and Eastern Europe

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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