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One War at a Time: Britain, the War of 1812 and the Defeat of Napoleon

Description

Professor Andrew Lambert, Laughton Professor of Naval History, King's College London, gives a talk for the ELAC/CCW seminar series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | america | France | Britain | napoleonic war | ethics | law | war | napoleon | armed conflict | europe | america | France | Britain | napoleonic war | ethics | law | war | napoleon | armed conflict | 2012-05-23

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Reporting the UK to a French audience

Description

Sonia Delesalle-Stolper, London correspondent for Libération, gives a talk for the Reuters School of Journalism on reporting the UK in the French media. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

media | reuters | journalism | France | media | reuters | journalism | France | 2013-01-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.346 France 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT) 21H.346 France 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT)

Description

A century and a half ago, Alexis de Tocqueville argued that the Revolution of 1789 in France constituted the culmination of long-term administrative and social changes, rather than a rupture with the past. In this class, we will consider that Tocquevillian insight by examining four aspects of French experience from the reign of the Sun King, Louis XIV, to the rule of the Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte: Absolutism, Enlightenment, Revolution, and Empire. Through the study of primary and secondary sources, we will see how the material lives, mental worlds, and individual and communal identities of the French changed over this century and a half. A century and a half ago, Alexis de Tocqueville argued that the Revolution of 1789 in France constituted the culmination of long-term administrative and social changes, rather than a rupture with the past. In this class, we will consider that Tocquevillian insight by examining four aspects of French experience from the reign of the Sun King, Louis XIV, to the rule of the Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte: Absolutism, Enlightenment, Revolution, and Empire. Through the study of primary and secondary sources, we will see how the material lives, mental worlds, and individual and communal identities of the French changed over this century and a half.

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleon | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | constitutional monarchy | France | France | de Tocqueville | de Tocqueville | administrative | administrative | social | social | changes | changes | Louis XIV | Louis XIV | absolutism | absolutism | enlightenment | enlightenment | revolution | revolution | empire | empire

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.561 European Politics (MIT) 17.561 European Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations. This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations.

Subjects

European politics | European politics | political power | political power | Britain | Britain | France | France | Germany | Germany | Italy | Italy | political parties | political parties | social class | social class | citizenship | citizenship | prime ministers | prime ministers | economy | economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | capitalism | capitalism | labour | labour | liberalization | liberalization | history | history | corruption | corruption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.951 Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: Past, Present and Future (MIT) 17.951 Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: Past, Present and Future (MIT)

Description

This course will expose students to tools and methods of analysis for use in assessing the challenges and dangers associated with nuclear weapons in international politics. The first two weeks of the course will look at the technology and design of nuclear weapons and their means of production. The next five weeks will look at the role they played in the Cold War, the organizations that managed them, the technologies that were developed to deliver them, and the methods used to analyze nuclear force structures and model nuclear exchanges. The last six weeks of the course will look at theories and cases of nuclear decision making beyond the original five weapon states, and will look particularly at why states pursue or forego nuclear weapons, the role that individuals and institutions play, This course will expose students to tools and methods of analysis for use in assessing the challenges and dangers associated with nuclear weapons in international politics. The first two weeks of the course will look at the technology and design of nuclear weapons and their means of production. The next five weeks will look at the role they played in the Cold War, the organizations that managed them, the technologies that were developed to deliver them, and the methods used to analyze nuclear force structures and model nuclear exchanges. The last six weeks of the course will look at theories and cases of nuclear decision making beyond the original five weapon states, and will look particularly at why states pursue or forego nuclear weapons, the role that individuals and institutions play,

Subjects

nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | war | war | politics | politics | World War II | World War II | Soviet Union | Soviet Union | Cold War | Cold War | Great Britain | Great Britain | France | France | China | China | India | India | Israel | Israel | Pakistan | Pakistan | North Korea | North Korea | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear disarmament | nuclear disarmament | security | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT) 17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT)

Description

This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra

Subjects

Strategy | Strategy | grand | grand | comparative | comparative | United States | United States | Great Britian | Great Britian | France | France | Germany | Germany | Russia | Russia | Europe | Europe | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | political | political | military | military | security | security | doctrine | doctrine | organizations | organizations | nationalism | nationalism | international | international | World War I | World War I | World War II | World War II | land warfare | land warfare | methods | methods | history | history | case study | case study

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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French ways and their meaning French ways and their meaning

Description

ebook version of French ways and their meaning ebook version of French ways and their meaning

Subjects

kind | kind | American prose literature -- 20th cenutry | American prose literature -- 20th cenutry | Etiquette -- France -- 20th century | Etiquette -- France -- 20th century | Etiquette -- Germany -- 20th century | Etiquette -- Germany -- 20th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT) 21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT)

Description

The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti

Subjects

Literature | Literature | celtic | celtic | colonization | colonization | King Arthur | King Arthur | Knights of the Round Table | Knights of the Round Table | British Imperialism | British Imperialism | Catholic Church | Catholic Church | twelfth century | twelfth century | thirteenth century | thirteenth century | morphology | morphology | Arthurian romance | Arthurian romance | historical documents | historical documents | English conquests | English conquests | Brittany | Brittany | Wales | Wales | Scotland | Scotland | Ireland | Ireland | Bede | Bede | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Chr?tien de Troyes | Chr?tien de Troyes | Marie de France | Marie de France | Gerald of Wales | Gerald of Wales | Perilous Graveyard | Perilous Graveyard | Knight of the Sword | Knight of the Sword | Perlesvaus | Perlesvaus | High History of the Holy Graal | High History of the Holy Graal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between. This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between.

Subjects

Nineteenth-century | Nineteenth-century | American | American | authors | authors | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Martin Delany | Martin Delany | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | Dred | Dred | Frances E. W. Harper | Frances E. W. Harper | Charles Chesnutt | Charles Chesnutt | Civil War | Civil War | Pudd'nhead Wilson | Pudd'nhead Wilson | racial tensions | racial tensions | social | social | political | political | realities. | realities.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.012 Forms of Western Narrative (MIT) 21L.012 Forms of Western Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class will investigate the ways in which the formal aspects of Western storytelling in various media have shaped both fantasies and perceptions, making certain understandings of experience possible through the selection, arrangement, and processing of narrative material. Surveying the field chronologically across the major narrative genres and sub-genres from Homeric epic through the novel and across media to include live performance, film, and video games, we will be examining the ways in which new ideologies and psychological insights become available through the development of various narrative techniques and new technologies. Emphasis will be placed on the generic conventions of story-telling as well as on literary and cultural issues, the role of media and modes of transmission, This class will investigate the ways in which the formal aspects of Western storytelling in various media have shaped both fantasies and perceptions, making certain understandings of experience possible through the selection, arrangement, and processing of narrative material. Surveying the field chronologically across the major narrative genres and sub-genres from Homeric epic through the novel and across media to include live performance, film, and video games, we will be examining the ways in which new ideologies and psychological insights become available through the development of various narrative techniques and new technologies. Emphasis will be placed on the generic conventions of story-telling as well as on literary and cultural issues, the role of media and modes of transmission,

Subjects

literature | literature | western | western | narrative | narrative | storytelling | storytelling | media | media | epic | epic | novel | novel | performance | performance | film | film | video games | video games | ideology | ideology | psychology | psychology | technology | technology | culture | culture | literary theory | literary theory | anthropology | anthropology | communication | communication | Homer | Homer | Sophocles | Sophocles | Herodotus | Herodotus | Christian evangelists | Christian evangelists | Marie de France | Marie de France | Cervantes | Cervantes | La Clos | La Clos | Poe | Poe | Lang | Lang | Cocteau | Cocteau | Disney | Disney | Pixar | Pixar | Maxis | Maxis | Electronic Arts | Electronic Arts | Propp | Propp | Bakhtin | Bakhtin | Girard | Girard | Freud | Freud | Marx | Marx

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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De Gaulle's Republic 1958 - 1969 De Gaulle's Republic 1958 - 1969

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010, This module examines the founding first decade of the Fifth Republic by focusing principally, though not exclusively, on the personality and political ideas of Charles de Gaulle. It begins by examining his emergence as the providential leader of the Resistance, to the frustrations of the Liberation and his thwarted plans for the constitutional renaissance of France, through the Fourth Republic and the wilderness years to his return in 1958, before turning to focus on the new regime and tracing the political history of the Fifth Republic between 1958 and 1969: the period Pierre Viansson-Ponté christened ‘la République gaullienne’. The main, though by no means exclusi This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010, This module examines the founding first decade of the Fifth Republic by focusing principally, though not exclusively, on the personality and political ideas of Charles de Gaulle. It begins by examining his emergence as the providential leader of the Resistance, to the frustrations of the Liberation and his thwarted plans for the constitutional renaissance of France, through the Fourth Republic and the wilderness years to his return in 1958, before turning to focus on the new regime and tracing the political history of the Fifth Republic between 1958 and 1969: the period Pierre Viansson-Ponté christened ‘la République gaullienne’. The main, though by no means exclusi

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Fifth Republic | Fifth Republic | Charles de Gaulle | Charles de Gaulle | leader of the resistance | leader of the resistance | constitutional renaissance of France | constitutional renaissance of France | Fourth Republic | Fourth Republic | political history of the Fifth Republic | political history of the Fifth Republic | Pierre Viansson-Ponté | Pierre Viansson-Ponté | ukoer | ukoer | République gaullienne’. | République gaullienne’.

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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THEMIS: American migrants in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom: diversity of migration motivations and patterns

Description

Amanda Klekowski von Koppenfels presents her paper 'American migrants in France, Germany, and the UK' in Parallel session II(D) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond, 24-26 Sept 2013 Migration between two countries, or localities within those countries, is usually examined only uni-directionally (although return migration may, often in a context of transnationalism, be taken into account). Examining the less-studied half of such a migration dyad can help us to understand more clearly the ways in which migration feedback processes function. This paper considers the case of Americans in France, Germany and the United Kingdom, three key receiving countries for American migrants (estimated at 2.2 to 6.8 million worldwide), and will examine the role of networks a

Subjects

THEMIS | migration | France | Germany | united kingdom | THEMIS | migration | France | Germany | united kingdom | 2013-09-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks

Description

Video and link to presentation by Christina Hendricks for the Repetition Compulsion theme, February 2015. Video and link to presentation by Christina Hendricks for the Repetition Compulsion theme, February 2015.

Subjects

lecture | lecture | powerpoint | powerpoint | Repetition Compulsion | Repetition Compulsion | video | video | Beauvoir | Beauvoir | C20th | C20th | Caribbean | Caribbean | Existentialism | Existentialism | France | France | philosophy | philosophy | postcolonialism | postcolonialism | Sartre | Sartre

License

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motherly milk in Enlightenment France

Description

In this Fertility and Reproduction Seminar Margaret Carlyle (Cambridge) discusses developments in breastpump technology in 18th-century France (27 October 2014) Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | history | France | breastfeeding | nutrition | childcare | society | anthropology | history | France | breastfeeding | nutrition | childcare | society | 2014-10-27

License

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Cultures Cultures

Description

In this free course, Cultures, you will address the question of traditional music and music from the francophone world, and you will examine the place they occupy in the world of artistic creation. The course is divided into three sections: 'Is traditional music, current music?', 'The musical heritage of Normandy' and 'Music of the francophone world'. First published on Tue, 20 Dec 2011 as Cultures. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 In this free course, Cultures, you will address the question of traditional music and music from the francophone world, and you will examine the place they occupy in the world of artistic creation. The course is divided into three sections: 'Is traditional music, current music?', 'The musical heritage of Normandy' and 'Music of the francophone world'. First published on Tue, 20 Dec 2011 as Cultures. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

French | French | France | France | Normandy | Normandy | L211_1 | L211_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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THEMIS: American migrants in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom: diversity of migration motivations and patterns

Description

Amanda Klekowski von Koppenfels presents her paper 'American migrants in France, Germany, and the UK' in Parallel session II(D) of the conference Examining Migration Dynamics: Networks and Beyond, 24-26 Sept 2013 Migration between two countries, or localities within those countries, is usually examined only uni-directionally (although return migration may, often in a context of transnationalism, be taken into account). Examining the less-studied half of such a migration dyad can help us to understand more clearly the ways in which migration feedback processes function. This paper considers the case of Americans in France, Germany and the United Kingdom, three key receiving countries for American migrants (estimated at 2.2 to 6.8 million worldwide), and will examine the role of networks a Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

THEMIS | migration | France | Germany | united kingdom | THEMIS | migration | France | Germany | united kingdom | 2013-09-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21G.341 Contemporary French Film and Social Issues (MIT) 21G.341 Contemporary French Film and Social Issues (MIT)

Description

This course covers issues in contemporary French society as expressed through movies made in the 2000s. Topics include France's national self-image, the women's movement, sexuality and gender, family life and class structure, post-colonialism and immigration, and American cultural imperialism. Films by Lelouch, Audiard, Doillon, Denis, Klapisch, Resnais, Rouan, Balasko, Collard, Dridi, Kassovitz, and others. Readings from French periodicals. Films shown with English subtitles. Taught in French. This course covers issues in contemporary French society as expressed through movies made in the 2000s. Topics include France's national self-image, the women's movement, sexuality and gender, family life and class structure, post-colonialism and immigration, and American cultural imperialism. Films by Lelouch, Audiard, Doillon, Denis, Klapisch, Resnais, Rouan, Balasko, Collard, Dridi, Kassovitz, and others. Readings from French periodicals. Films shown with English subtitles. Taught in French.

Subjects

France | France | French | French | contemporary | contemporary | 1990s | 1990s | national image | national image | women's movement | women's movement | sexuality | sexuality | gender | gender | class structure | class structure | family | family | post-colonialism | post-colonialism | immigration | immigration | American cultural imperialism | American cultural imperialism | Lelouch | Lelouch | Audiard | Audiard | Doillon | Doillon | Denis | Denis | Klapisch | Klapisch | Resnais | Resnais | Rouan | Rouan | Balasko | Balasko | Collard | Collard | Dridi | Dridi | Kassovitz | Kassovitz

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.346 Topics in Modern French Literature and Culture: North America Through French Eyes (MIT) 21G.346 Topics in Modern French Literature and Culture: North America Through French Eyes (MIT)

Description

This course offers an analysis of the keen interest shown by France and the French in North American cultures since the eighteenth century. Not only did France contribute to the construction of both Canadian and American nations but also it has constantly delineated its identity by way of praising or criticizing North American cultures. Taught in French. This course offers an analysis of the keen interest shown by France and the French in North American cultures since the eighteenth century. Not only did France contribute to the construction of both Canadian and American nations but also it has constantly delineated its identity by way of praising or criticizing North American cultures. Taught in French.

Subjects

France | France | North America | North America | Canada | Canada | United States | United States | liberalism | liberalism | entertainment | entertainment | media | media | trade | trade | cultural goods | cultural goods | transatlantic intellectual encounters | transatlantic intellectual encounters | translation | translation | Tocqueville | Tocqueville | Céline | Céline | Beauvoir | Beauvoir | Dubois | Dubois | Tati | Tati | Chomet | Chomet | anti-globalization | anti-globalization | Barack Obama | Barack Obama | Hergé | Hergé | Tintin | Tintin | de Tocqueville | de Tocqueville | de Gaulle | de Gaulle | Victor Hugo | Victor Hugo | Sarkozy | Sarkozy | Baudrillard | Baudrillard | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Sartre | Sartre | Stuart Hall | Stuart Hall

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.053 Understanding Contemporary French Politics (MIT) 21G.053 Understanding Contemporary French Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the changes in contemporary French society through the study of political debates, reforms and institutions since 1958, and analyzes the deep influence of politics on cultural and social life, despite a decline in political participation. Public controversies and political cleavages, from the Algerian war to postcolonial issues, from the birth of the European Union to the recent financial crisis, and from the moral "revolution" of the seventies to the recognition of new families are revisited. This course is taught in English. This course examines the changes in contemporary French society through the study of political debates, reforms and institutions since 1958, and analyzes the deep influence of politics on cultural and social life, despite a decline in political participation. Public controversies and political cleavages, from the Algerian war to postcolonial issues, from the birth of the European Union to the recent financial crisis, and from the moral "revolution" of the seventies to the recognition of new families are revisited. This course is taught in English.

Subjects

French | French | France | France | French society culture | French society culture | politics | politics | presidency | presidency | ideology | ideology | Fifth Republic | Fifth Republic | political system | political system | public speaking | public speaking | political debate | political debate

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.068J The Invention of French Theory: A History of Transatlantic Intellectual Life since 1945 (MIT) 21G.068J The Invention of French Theory: A History of Transatlantic Intellectual Life since 1945 (MIT)

Description

In the decades following the Second World War, a cluster of extraordinary French thinkers were widely translated and read in American universities. Their works were soon labeled as "French Theory." Why would sharing the same nationality make authors such as Lacan, Cixous, Derrida, Foucault or Debord, ambassadors of a specifically "French" theory? The course will explore the maze of transatlantic intellectual debates since 1945 and the heyday of French existentialism. We will study the debates on communism, decolonization, neo‐liberalism, gender, youth culture and mass media. This course is taught in English. In the decades following the Second World War, a cluster of extraordinary French thinkers were widely translated and read in American universities. Their works were soon labeled as "French Theory." Why would sharing the same nationality make authors such as Lacan, Cixous, Derrida, Foucault or Debord, ambassadors of a specifically "French" theory? The course will explore the maze of transatlantic intellectual debates since 1945 and the heyday of French existentialism. We will study the debates on communism, decolonization, neo‐liberalism, gender, youth culture and mass media. This course is taught in English.

Subjects

21G.068 | 21G.068 | WGS.234 | WGS.234 | French Theory | French Theory | postcolonial France | postcolonial France | existentialism | existentialism | Lacan | Lacan | Camus | Camus | Sartre | Sartre | Debord | Debord | Foucault | Foucault | Derrida | Derrida | Barthes | Barthes | Bourdieu | Bourdieu | Lyotard | Lyotard | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Eribon | Eribon | Blanchot | Blanchot | Franz Fanon | Franz Fanon | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | gender | gender | communism | communism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.312 Basic Themes in French Literature and Culture (MIT) 21G.312 Basic Themes in French Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

Childhood is a source of fascination in most Western cultures. It is both a major inspiration for artistic creation and a political ideal, which aims at protecting future generations. Which role does it play in French society and in other francophone areas? Why is the French national anthem ("La Marseillaise") addressed to its "children"? This course will study the transformation of childhood since the 18th century and the development of sentimentality within the family. We will examine various representations of childhood in literature (e.g. Pagnol, Proust, Sarraute, Laye, Morgièvre), movies (e.g. Truffaut), and songs (e.g. Brel, Barbara). Course taught in French. Childhood is a source of fascination in most Western cultures. It is both a major inspiration for artistic creation and a political ideal, which aims at protecting future generations. Which role does it play in French society and in other francophone areas? Why is the French national anthem ("La Marseillaise") addressed to its "children"? This course will study the transformation of childhood since the 18th century and the development of sentimentality within the family. We will examine various representations of childhood in literature (e.g. Pagnol, Proust, Sarraute, Laye, Morgièvre), movies (e.g. Truffaut), and songs (e.g. Brel, Barbara). Course taught in French.

Subjects

French | French | Romain Gary | Romain Gary | literature | literature | l'enfance | l'enfance | cultural studies | cultural studies | films | films | France | France | société | société | françaises | françaises | historique | historique | La République | La République | littéraire | littéraire | filmique | filmique | textes | textes | chansons | chansons | identité Française | identité Française | Truffaut | Truffaut | sexe et sexualité | sexe et sexualité | la guerre | la guerre | la vie devant soi | la vie devant soi | les médias de masse | les médias de masse | l'enfant roi | l'enfant roi

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.017 Germany and its European Context (MIT) 21G.017 Germany and its European Context (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on main currents in contemporary German literary and visual culture. Taking Nietzsche's thought as a point of departure, students will survey the dialectics of tradition and modernity in both Germany and other European countries, particularly the UK, France, Denmark, and Poland. Primary works are drawn from literature, cinema, art, and performance, including works by Peter Sloterdijk, Thomas Vinterberg, and Michel Houellebecq. This course focuses on main currents in contemporary German literary and visual culture. Taking Nietzsche's thought as a point of departure, students will survey the dialectics of tradition and modernity in both Germany and other European countries, particularly the UK, France, Denmark, and Poland. Primary works are drawn from literature, cinema, art, and performance, including works by Peter Sloterdijk, Thomas Vinterberg, and Michel Houellebecq.

Subjects

Germany | Germany | European | European | Politics | Politics | Society | Society | Nietzsche | Nietzsche | United Kingdom | United Kingdom | France | France | Denmark | Denmark | Poland | Poland | Art | Art | Performance | Performance | Peter Sloterdijk | Peter Sloterdijk | Thomas Vinterberg | Thomas Vinterberg | Michel Houellebecq | Michel Houellebecq

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT) 21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th 21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th

Subjects

21G.031 | 21G.031 | 4.608 | 4.608 | avante garde | avante garde | kulturindustrie | kulturindustrie | germany | germany | asia | asia | latin america | latin america | africa | africa | europe | europe | culture | culture | consumer | consumer | history | history | politics | politics | Adorno | Adorno | Aragon | Aragon | Bataille | Bataille | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Breton | Breton | B?rger | B?rger | Duchamp | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Eisenstein | Ernst | Ernst | J?nger | J?nger | Greenberg | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Kandinsky | Malevich | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Mayakovsky | Tzara | Tzara | cinema | cinema | movies | movies | film | film | music | music | literature | literature | French culture | French culture | German culture | German culture | 20th century | 20th century | twentieth century | twentieth century | surrealism | surrealism | dadaism | dadaism | art history | art history | France | France | art movements | art movements | futurism | futurism | 21F.031J | 21F.031J | 21F.031 | 21F.031

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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