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7.340 Immune Evasion: How Sneaky Pathogens Avoid Host Surveillance (MIT) 7.340 Immune Evasion: How Sneaky Pathogens Avoid Host Surveillance (MIT)

Description

Every infection consists of a battle between the invading pathogen and the resisting host. To be successful, a pathogen must escape the many defenses of the host immune system until it can replicate and spread to another host. A pathogen must prevent one of three stages of immune function: detection, activation, or effector function. Examples of disease-specific immune evasion and the mechanisms used by pathogens to prevail over their hosts' immune systems are discussed. Also considered is what these host-pathogen interactions reveal about the normal function of the immune system and basic cell biological processes, such as protein maturation and degradation. Every infection consists of a battle between the invading pathogen and the resisting host. To be successful, a pathogen must escape the many defenses of the host immune system until it can replicate and spread to another host. A pathogen must prevent one of three stages of immune function: detection, activation, or effector function. Examples of disease-specific immune evasion and the mechanisms used by pathogens to prevail over their hosts' immune systems are discussed. Also considered is what these host-pathogen interactions reveal about the normal function of the immune system and basic cell biological processes, such as protein maturation and degradation.

Subjects

immunology | immunology | immune system | immune system | immune evasion | immune evasion | pathogen | pathogen | effector function | effector function | infections | infections | Human cytomegalovirus | Human cytomegalovirus | Human Immunodeficiency Virus | Human Immunodeficiency Virus | CD4 cells | CD4 cells | CD8 cells | CD8 cells | T cells | T cells | surace receptors | surace receptors | cell lysis | cell lysis | host-pathogen interactions | host-pathogen interactions | host surveillance | host surveillance | antibodies | antibodies | MHC class I | MHC class I | blood-borne pathogens | blood-borne pathogens | macrophages | macrophages | phagocytosis | phagocytosis | endocytosis | endocytosis | degradation | degradation | antigen | antigen | apoptosis | apoptosis | cytokines | cytokines | immune response | immune response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology (MIT) HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology (MIT)

Description

This course covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation, including molecular structure and assembly of MHC molecules, the biology of cytokines, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases. The course is structured as a series of lectures and tutorials in which clinical cases are discussed with faculty tutors. Lecturers Frederick W. Alt Marcus Altfeld Paul Anderson Jon C. Aster Hugh Auchincloss Steven P. Balk Samuel M. Behar Richard S. Blumberg Francisco Bonilla Bobby Cherayil Benjamin Davis David Hafler Nir Harcohen Bruce Horwitz David M. Lee Andrew Lichtman Diane Mathis Richard Mitchell Hidde Ploegh Emmett This course covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation, including molecular structure and assembly of MHC molecules, the biology of cytokines, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases. The course is structured as a series of lectures and tutorials in which clinical cases are discussed with faculty tutors. Lecturers Frederick W. Alt Marcus Altfeld Paul Anderson Jon C. Aster Hugh Auchincloss Steven P. Balk Samuel M. Behar Richard S. Blumberg Francisco Bonilla Bobby Cherayil Benjamin Davis David Hafler Nir Harcohen Bruce Horwitz David M. Lee Andrew Lichtman Diane Mathis Richard Mitchell Hidde Ploegh Emmett

Subjects

immunology | immunology | immune system | immune system | lymphocyte | lymphocyte | antigen | antigen | receptors | receptors | antibody | antibody | T cells | T cells | signal transduction | signal transduction | immunity | immunity | transplantation | transplantation | autoimmunity | autoimmunity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Hepatitis C vaccine

Description

Dr Ellie Barnes talks about her research on Hepatitis C and her work on a T cell vaccine. Dr Ellie Barnes aims to develop a prophylactic and a therapeutic hepatitis C virus vaccine to combat a global epidemic currently infecting 170 million people worldwide. Many chronically infected patients silently develop complications of liver disease that can include hepatocellular cancer, liver cirrhosis and liver failure. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

therapy | Hepatitis C virus | T cells | vaccine | genotype-3 | therapy | Hepatitis C virus | T cells | vaccine | genotype-3

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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HIV and children in Africa

Description

Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones tells us about her work on HIV with children in Africa. Prof. Sarah Rowland-Jones' work mainly focuses on anti-viral immunity, and in particular how immune responses modify the outcome of HIV infection. Her research aims to contribute to the design of vaccines and immunotherapies against HIV infection, including HIV-2 infection, in developing countries where an effective vaccine is desperately needed. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity | Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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How can we live with HIV?

Description

Dr Lucy Dorrell tells us how our immune system controls HIV and how we can live with this virus. The aim of Dr Lucy Dorrells' research is to develop immunotherapy to reduce the dependence of those infected with HIV-1 on their current treatment - antiretroviral therapy (ART). This is because 9 million of the estimated 33 million people living with HIV/AIDS today are not able to access the ARTs which they are in immediate need of. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

hiv | antiretroviral | T cells | clinical trial | viral vector | vaccine | hiv | antiretroviral | T cells | clinical trial | viral vector | vaccine

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Viruses, how to be the perfect host

Description

Professor Paul Klenerman talks about our relationship with persistent viruses, such as Hepatitis C. Prof. Paul Klenerman studies the evolutionary relationships between persistent viruses and their human hosts. He aims to understand the role of our immune responses in determining the outcome of Hepatitis C virus infection. Hepatitis C virus infects around 200 million people worldwide and is a major cause of liver disease. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Hepatitis C virus | T cells | virus | hiv | liver and flow cytometry | Hepatitis C virus | T cells | virus | hiv | liver and flow cytometry

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Hepatitis C vaccine

Description

Dr Ellie Barnes talks about her research on Hepatitis C and her work on a T cell vaccine. Dr Ellie Barnes aims to develop a prophylactic and a therapeutic hepatitis C virus vaccine to combat a global epidemic currently infecting 170 million people worldwide. Many chronically infected patients silently develop complications of liver disease that can include hepatocellular cancer, liver cirrhosis and liver failure. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

therapy | Hepatitis C virus | T cells | vaccine | genotype-3 | therapy | Hepatitis C virus | T cells | vaccine | genotype-3

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

Attribution

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HIV and children in Africa

Description

Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones tells us about her work on HIV with children in Africa. Prof. Sarah Rowland-Jones' work mainly focuses on anti-viral immunity, and in particular how immune responses modify the outcome of HIV infection. Her research aims to contribute to the design of vaccines and immunotherapies against HIV infection, including HIV-2 infection, in developing countries where an effective vaccine is desperately needed. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity | Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

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How can we live with HIV?

Description

Dr Lucy Dorrell tells us how our immune system controls HIV and how we can live with this virus. The aim of Dr Lucy Dorrells' research is to develop immunotherapy to reduce the dependence of those infected with HIV-1 on their current treatment - antiretroviral therapy (ART). This is because 9 million of the estimated 33 million people living with HIV/AIDS today are not able to access the ARTs which they are in immediate need of. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

hiv | antiretroviral | T cells | clinical trial | viral vector | vaccine | hiv | antiretroviral | T cells | clinical trial | viral vector | vaccine

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Viruses, how to be the perfect host

Description

Professor Paul Klenerman talks about our relationship with persistent viruses, such as Hepatitis C. Prof. Paul Klenerman studies the evolutionary relationships between persistent viruses and their human hosts. He aims to understand the role of our immune responses in determining the outcome of Hepatitis C virus infection. Hepatitis C virus infects around 200 million people worldwide and is a major cause of liver disease. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Hepatitis C virus | T cells | virus | hiv | liver and flow cytometry | Hepatitis C virus | T cells | virus | hiv | liver and flow cytometry

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Immunology basics Immunology basics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn semester 2009 Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The body fights infection through the functions of the immune system, whose power has been harnessed by the development of vaccination (immunisation). Suitable for study at: Undergraduate levels 1 and 2. Dr Ian Todd, School of Molecular Medical Sciences Dr Ian Todd is Associate Professor & Reader in Cellular Immunopathology at The University of Nottingham. After reading Biochemistry at The University of Oxford, he carried out research for his PhD in Immunology at University College London. He then undertook post-doctoral research at The Oregon Health Sciences University and The Middlesex Hospital Medica This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn semester 2009 Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The body fights infection through the functions of the immune system, whose power has been harnessed by the development of vaccination (immunisation). Suitable for study at: Undergraduate levels 1 and 2. Dr Ian Todd, School of Molecular Medical Sciences Dr Ian Todd is Associate Professor & Reader in Cellular Immunopathology at The University of Nottingham. After reading Biochemistry at The University of Oxford, he carried out research for his PhD in Immunology at University College London. He then undertook post-doctoral research at The Oregon Health Sciences University and The Middlesex Hospital Medica

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Immunology | Immunology | Introduction to immunology | Introduction to immunology | Recognition of extracellular pathogens | Recognition of extracellular pathogens | Defence against extracellular pathogens | Defence against extracellular pathogens | T cell-mediated immunity | T cell-mediated immunity | Helper T cells and cytokines | Helper T cells and cytokines | Immunity to viruses | Immunity to viruses

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology (MIT)

Description

This course covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation, including molecular structure and assembly of MHC molecules, the biology of cytokines, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases. The course is structured as a series of lectures and tutorials in which clinical cases are discussed with faculty tutors. Lecturers Frederick W. Alt Marcus Altfeld Paul Anderson Jon C. Aster Hugh Auchincloss Steven P. Balk Samuel M. Behar Richard S. Blumberg Francisco Bonilla Bobby Cherayil Benjamin Davis David Hafler Nir Harcohen Bruce Horwitz David M. Lee Andrew Lichtman Diane Mathis Richard Mitchell Hidde Ploegh Emmett

Subjects

immunology | immune system | lymphocyte | antigen | receptors | antibody | T cells | signal transduction | immunity | transplantation | autoimmunity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Immune Evasion: How Sneaky Pathogens Avoid Host Surveillance (MIT)

Description

Every infection consists of a battle between the invading pathogen and the resisting host. To be successful, a pathogen must escape the many defenses of the host immune system until it can replicate and spread to another host. A pathogen must prevent one of three stages of immune function: detection, activation, or effector function. Examples of disease-specific immune evasion and the mechanisms used by pathogens to prevail over their hosts' immune systems are discussed. Also considered is what these host-pathogen interactions reveal about the normal function of the immune system and basic cell biological processes, such as protein maturation and degradation.

Subjects

immunology | immune system | immune evasion | pathogen | effector function | infections | Human cytomegalovirus | Human Immunodeficiency Virus | CD4 cells | CD8 cells | T cells | surace receptors | cell lysis | host-pathogen interactions | host surveillance | antibodies | MHC class I | blood-borne pathogens | macrophages | phagocytosis | endocytosis | degradation | antigen | apoptosis | cytokines | immune response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology (MIT)

Description

This course covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation, including molecular structure and assembly of MHC molecules, the biology of cytokines, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases. The course is structured as a series of lectures and tutorials in which clinical cases are discussed with faculty tutors. Lecturers Frederick W. Alt Marcus Altfeld Paul Anderson Jon C. Aster Hugh Auchincloss Steven P. Balk Samuel M. Behar Richard S. Blumberg Francisco Bonilla Bobby Cherayil Benjamin Davis David Hafler Nir Harcohen Bruce Horwitz David M. Lee Andrew Lichtman Diane Mathis Richard Mitchell Hidde Ploegh Emmett

Subjects

immunology | immune system | lymphocyte | antigen | receptors | antibody | T cells | signal transduction | immunity | transplantation | autoimmunity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

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