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17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT) 17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public. This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public.

Subjects

United States social policy | United States social policy | U.S. policymaking process | U.S. policymaking process | political institutions | political institutions | policy elites | policy elites | media | media | mass public | mass public | American exceptionalism | American exceptionalism | Congress | Congress | U.S. courts | U.S. courts | representative government and participation | representative government and participation | policy in practice | policy in practice

License

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | Lawrence | MA | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | 21h.104 | 21h.104 | 11.015 | 11.015

License

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

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17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT) 17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT)

Description

This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform. This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | natioanl security | natioanl security | origins | origins | structure | structure | functions | functions | U.S. | U.S. | Intelligence | Intelligence | Community | Community | national security policy | national security policy | intelligence agencies | intelligence agencies | collection | collection | analysis | analysis | counterintelligence | counterintelligence | covert action | covert action | strategic warning | strategic warning | counterterrorism | counterterrorism | counterproliferation | counterproliferation | counterinsurgency | counterinsurgency | controversies | controversies | policymakers | policymakers | congressional oversight | congressional oversight | reform | reform

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.951 Intelligence: Practice, Problems and Prospects (MIT) 17.951 Intelligence: Practice, Problems and Prospects (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role. The events of 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq have focused new attention on national intelligence, including the most significant reorganization of the community since the National Security Act of 1947. The course will highlight some of the major debates about the role, practices, and problems of national intelligence. This course will explore the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role. The events of 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq have focused new attention on national intelligence, including the most significant reorganization of the community since the National Security Act of 1947. The course will highlight some of the major debates about the role, practices, and problems of national intelligence.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | U.S. Intelligence Community | U.S. Intelligence Community | national security | national security | policymakers | policymakers | future role | future role | 9/11 | 9/11 | Iraq | Iraq | national intelligence | national intelligence | National Security Act of 1947 | National Security Act of 1947

License

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17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT) 17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT)

Description

At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death, At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death,

Subjects

Soviet Union | Soviet Union | politics | politics | communism | communism | history | history | socialist republics | socialist republics | world war two | world war two | stalin | stalin | khruschev | khruschev | brezhnev | brezhnev | october revolution | october revolution | political economy | political economy | lenin | lenin | industrialization | industrialization | collectivism | collectivism | repression | repression | society | society | culture | culture | Soviet system | Soviet system | U.S.S.R. | U.S.S.R. | Soviet society | Soviet society | political reform | political reform | social reform | social reform | revolutionary regime | revolutionary regime | Stalin revolution | Stalin revolution | post-Stalinist | post-Stalinist | Soviet collapse | Soviet collapse | political history | political history | 17.57 | 17.57 | 21H.467 | 21H.467

License

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11.941 Use of Joint Fact Finding in Science Intensive Policy Disputes, Part I (MIT) 11.941 Use of Joint Fact Finding in Science Intensive Policy Disputes, Part I (MIT)

Description

11.941 and 11.942 make up a one-year seminar. The goal of this seminar is to explore the role of science and scientists in ecosystems and natural resources management focusing on joint fact finding as a new approach to environmental policy-making. Increasingly scientists and science organizations are confronting a conundrum: Why is science often ignored in important societal decisions even as the call for decisions based on sound science escalates? One reason is that decision-making is often driven by a variety of nonscientific, adversarial, and stakeholder dynamics. Thus, even though science helps inform choices, it is only one of many values and interests considered by each stakeholder. In response to this emerging challenge, scientists, and science agencies such as the U.S. Geologi 11.941 and 11.942 make up a one-year seminar. The goal of this seminar is to explore the role of science and scientists in ecosystems and natural resources management focusing on joint fact finding as a new approach to environmental policy-making. Increasingly scientists and science organizations are confronting a conundrum: Why is science often ignored in important societal decisions even as the call for decisions based on sound science escalates? One reason is that decision-making is often driven by a variety of nonscientific, adversarial, and stakeholder dynamics. Thus, even though science helps inform choices, it is only one of many values and interests considered by each stakeholder. In response to this emerging challenge, scientists, and science agencies such as the U.S. Geologi

Subjects

ecosystems | ecosystems | natural resources management | natural resources management | environmental policy-making | environmental policy-making | science organizations | science organizations | science | science | decision-making | decision-making | science agencies | science agencies | U.S. Geological Survey | U.S. Geological Survey | environmental conflicts | environmental conflicts | Cape Wind controversy | Cape Wind controversy | disputes | disputes | joint fact finding | joint fact finding | environmental policy | environmental policy

License

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11.360 Community Growth and Land Use Planning (MIT) 11.360 Community Growth and Land Use Planning (MIT)

Description

This subject explores the techniques, processes, and personal and professional skills required to effectively manage growth and land use change. While primarily focused on the planning practice in the United States, the principles and techniques reviewed and presented may have international application. This course is not for bystanders; it is designed for those who wish to become actively involved or exposed to the planning discipline and profession as it is practiced today, and as it may need to be practiced in the future. This subject explores the techniques, processes, and personal and professional skills required to effectively manage growth and land use change. While primarily focused on the planning practice in the United States, the principles and techniques reviewed and presented may have international application. This course is not for bystanders; it is designed for those who wish to become actively involved or exposed to the planning discipline and profession as it is practiced today, and as it may need to be practiced in the future.

Subjects

growth management | growth management | land use planning and change | land use planning and change | planning | planning | professional practice | professional practice | participatory processes | participatory processes | client-based projects | client-based projects | GIS | GIS | community particpation | community particpation | regional development | regional development | Land use change | Land use change | land use planning | land use planning | United States of America | United States of America | U.S.A. | U.S.A. | government | government | zoning controls | zoning controls | growth rate controls | growth rate controls | visioning | visioning

License

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

License

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21A.217 Anthropology of War and Peace (MIT) 21A.217 Anthropology of War and Peace (MIT)

Description

This class has been reorganized to focus primarily on the War in Iraq. As in previous years, the class still examines war in cross-cultural perspective, asking whether war is intrinsic to human nature, what causes war, how particular cultural experiences of war differ, and how war has affected American culture. This class has been reorganized to focus primarily on the War in Iraq. As in previous years, the class still examines war in cross-cultural perspective, asking whether war is intrinsic to human nature, what causes war, how particular cultural experiences of war differ, and how war has affected American culture.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | war | war | peace | peace | f humans are by nature warlike | f humans are by nature warlike | the evolution of war in cross-cultural perspective | the evolution of war in cross-cultural perspective | the socialization of warriors and the construction of enemies | the socialization of warriors and the construction of enemies | the recent emergence of anti-war movements | the recent emergence of anti-war movements | sociobiological and other theories of war | sociobiological and other theories of war | ethnic hatred and civil war in Rwanda | ethnic hatred and civil war in Rwanda | Bosnia | Bosnia | and Northern Ireland | and Northern Ireland | military culture in the U.S. and elsewhere | military culture in the U.S. and elsewhere | peace movements | peace movements | studies of military conversion | studies of military conversion | Northern Ireland | Northern Ireland | humans are by nature warlike | humans are by nature warlike

License

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

21H.104 | 21H.104 | 11.015 | 11.015 | riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln. This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subjects

American colonies | American colonies | Civil War | Civil War | Spanish colonization | Spanish colonization | British empire | British empire | American Revolution | American Revolution | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | U.S. Constitution | U.S. Constitution | ratification | ratification | secession | secession | Bill of Rights | Bill of Rights | John Winthrop | John Winthrop | Thomas Paine | Thomas Paine | Thomas Jefferson | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | James Madison | William H. Garrison | William H. Garrison | George Fitzhugh | George Fitzhugh | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Abraham Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | Andrew Jackson | Andrew Jackson | George Mason | George Mason | abolition | abolition | Federalism | Federalism | slavery | slavery | Constitutional Convention | Constitutional Convention

License

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21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT) 21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT)

Description

This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City. This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City.

Subjects

immigration | immigration | migration | migration | lawrence | lawrence | chinatown | chinatown | U.S.-Mexico border | U.S.-Mexico border | Great Migration | Great Migration | The Jazz Singer | The Jazz Singer | Lower East Side | Lower East Side | ethnicity | ethnicity | New York City | New York City | New Immigration | New Immigration | Filipino | Filipino | american imperialism | american imperialism | cuban-american | cuban-american | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | caribbean migration | caribbean migration | asian immigration | asian immigration

License

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SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT) SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT)

Description

This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw

Subjects

seminar | seminar | samurai | samurai | cooking | cooking | blacksmithing | blacksmithing | Japan | Japan | Peru | Peru | China | China | U.S.A | U.S.A | England | England | longitude | longitude | marine navigation | marine navigation | clocks | clocks | cars | cars | suburbia | suburbia | weaving | weaving | quipus | quipus | encoding | encoding | aesthetics | aesthetics | Zen Buddhism | Zen Buddhism | Inca Empire | Inca Empire | culture | culture | myths | myths | technology | technology | social change | social change

License

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17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT) 17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT)

Description

At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death, At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death,

Subjects

Soviet Union | Soviet Union | politics | politics | communism | communism | history | history | socialist republics | socialist republics | world war two | world war two | stalin | stalin | khruschev | khruschev | brezhnev | brezhnev | october revolution | october revolution | political economy | political economy | lenin | lenin | industrialization | industrialization | collectivism | collectivism | repression | repression | society | society | culture | culture | Soviet system | Soviet system | U.S.S.R. | U.S.S.R. | Soviet society | Soviet society | political reform | political reform | social reform | social reform | revolutionary regime | revolutionary regime | Stalin revolution | Stalin revolution | post-Stalinist | post-Stalinist | Soviet collapse | Soviet collapse | political history | political history | 17.57 | 17.57 | 21H.467 | 21H.467

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.272 Culture Tech (MIT) ES.272 Culture Tech (MIT)

Description

This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw

Subjects

seminar | seminar | samurai | samurai | cooking | cooking | blacksmithing | blacksmithing | Japan | Japan | Peru | Peru | China | China | U.S.A | U.S.A | England | England | longitude | longitude | marine navigation | marine navigation | clocks | clocks | cars | cars | suburbia | suburbia | weaving | weaving | quipus | quipus | encoding | encoding | aesthetics | aesthetics | Zen Buddhism | Zen Buddhism | Inca Empire | Inca Empire | culture | culture | myths | myths | technology | technology | social change | social change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT) 21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence. An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | asian immigration | chinese problem | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | anti-asian movements | WWII | WWII | new wave immigration | new wave immigration | racism | racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | Chinatown | Chinatown | panethnicity | panethnicity | memoir | memoir | chinese exlucsion | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | Philippines | japanese-american internment | japanese-american internment | diaspora | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.473 The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation: Nuclear History, Strategy, and Statecraft (MIT) 17.473 The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation: Nuclear History, Strategy, and Statecraft (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the politics and theories surrounding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. It introduces the basics of nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, and deterrence theory. It also examines the historical record during the Cold War as well as the proliferation of nuclear weapons to regional powers and the resulting deterrence consequences. This course provides an introduction to the politics and theories surrounding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. It introduces the basics of nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, and deterrence theory. It also examines the historical record during the Cold War as well as the proliferation of nuclear weapons to regional powers and the resulting deterrence consequences.

Subjects

nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | strategy | strategy | statecraft | statecraft | world politics | world politics | global community | global community | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | foreign policy | foreign policy | international relations | international relations | rogue states | rogue states | non-state | non-state | deterrence | deterrence | containment | containment | atomic age | atomic age | bomb scare | bomb scare | Second World War | Second World War | Manhattan Project | Manhattan Project | Hiroshima | Hiroshima | nuclear power | nuclear power | nuclear age | nuclear age | nonproliferation | nonproliferation | early Cold War | early Cold War | the Berlin Crisis | the Berlin Crisis | the Cuban Missile Crisis | the Cuban Missile Crisis | Detente | Detente | nuclear arms control | nuclear arms control | nuclear balance | nuclear balance | Euromissile Crisis | Euromissile Crisis | Nuclear Suppliers Group | Nuclear Suppliers Group | parity | parity | Dr. Strangelove | Dr. Strangelove | terrorism | terrorism | global zero | global zero | U.S. policy | U.S. policy | national security | national security | nucelar dynamics | nucelar dynamics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public.

Subjects

United States social policy | U.S. policymaking process | political institutions | policy elites | media | mass public | American exceptionalism | Congress | U.S. courts | representative government and participation | policy in practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT) 17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT)

Description

At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death, At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death,

Subjects

Soviet Union | Soviet Union | politics | politics | communism | communism | history | history | socialist republics | socialist republics | world war two | world war two | stalin | stalin | khruschev | khruschev | brezhnev | brezhnev | october revolution | october revolution | political economy | political economy | lenin | lenin | industrialization | industrialization | collectivism | collectivism | repression | repression | society | society | culture | culture | Soviet system | Soviet system | U.S.S.R. | U.S.S.R. | Soviet society | Soviet society | political reform | political reform | social reform | social reform | revolutionary regime | revolutionary regime | Stalin revolution | Stalin revolution | post-Stalinist | post-Stalinist | Soviet collapse | Soviet collapse | political history | political history | 17.57 | 17.57 | 21H.467 | 21H.467

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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s win s win

Description

Donald Trump’s presidential election victory has—among many others—upset political commentators. Few predicted the outcome. Most used periodic polling and historical trends to predict that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton would win. Almost every step of the way, from the primaries to election night, there were election analysts who failed to acknowledge Trump as a credible contender. Studies of the electoral map suggested the pathway to the White House was nearly unachievable for Trump. He would need to win all of the big swing states to reach the required 270 Electoral College votes. In the end Clinton won the popular vote ... Donald Trump’s presidential election victory has—among many others—upset political commentators. Few predicted the outcome. Most used periodic polling and historical trends to predict that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton would win. Almost every step of the way, from the primaries to election night, there were election analysts who failed to acknowledge Trump as a credible contender. Studies of the electoral map suggested the pathway to the White House was nearly unachievable for Trump. He would need to win all of the big swing states to reach the required 270 Electoral College votes. In the end Clinton won the popular vote ...

Subjects

Special Series | Special Series | USA Decides 2016 | USA Decides 2016 | Donald Trump | Donald Trump | Hillary Clinton | Hillary Clinton | Polling | Polling | Polls | Polls | U.S. elections | U.S. elections

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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21F.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | WWII | new wave immigration | racism | affirmative action | race | ethnicity | Chinatown | panethnicity | memoir | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | japanese-american internment | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT)

Description

This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw

Subjects

seminar | samurai | cooking | blacksmithing | Japan | Peru | China | U.S.A | England | longitude | marine navigation | clocks | cars | suburbia | weaving | quipus | encoding | aesthetics | Zen Buddhism | Inca Empire | culture | myths | technology | social change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | WWII | new wave immigration | racism | affirmative action | race | ethnicity | Chinatown | panethnicity | memoir | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | japanese-american internment | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

riot | strike | conspiracy | cities | urbanism | U.S. history | revolutionary war | boston tea party | civil war | slavery | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | textile workers | Lawrence | MA | student uprising | Vietnam War | Columbia University | communism | socialism | Lawrence | MA | 21h.104 | 11.015

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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