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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This is a second variation of the course. It includes a survey of a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors studied include Twain, Wilde, Shakespeare, and Cervantes. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows the student to produce a long writing assignment, in addition to several shorter pieces; it also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through student-led discussion, class reports, and class participation. This is a second variation of the course. It includes a survey of a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors studied include Twain, Wilde, Shakespeare, and Cervantes. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows the student to produce a long writing assignment, in addition to several shorter pieces; it also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through student-led discussion, class reports, and class participation.

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Satire | Satire | Greek | Greek | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Writing | Writing | Literature | Literature | Communications | Communications | Cervantes | Cervantes | comedies | comedies | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Drama | Drama | Writing | Writing | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Brecht | Brecht | Nabokov | Nabokov | Heller | Heller | Chaucer | Chaucer | Milton | Milton | Allegory | Allegory | Satire | Satire | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature | tales | tales | satirical paintnigs | satirical paintnigs | films | films | comedies | comedies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays. This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subjects

humor | humor | drama | drama | narrative | narrative | genre | genre | literary history | literary history | irony | irony | comic | comic | slapstick | slapstick | satire | satire | wit | wit | trickster | trickster | allegory | allegory | transgression | transgression | social commentary | social commentary | political commentary | political commentary | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Aristophanes | Aristophanes | Moliere | Moliere | Aphra Behn | Aphra Behn | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Italo Calvino | Italo Calvino | Alison Bechdel | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT)

Description

This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays. This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays.

Subjects

Extensive reading | Extensive reading | major poets | major poets | evolution of each poet's work | evolution of each poet's work | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | recognition of beauty | recognition of beauty | justice | justice | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | British literary authors | British literary authors | 19th century | 19th century | literature | literature | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | Wordsworth | Keats | Wordsworth | Keats | Mary Robinson | Mary Robinson | Mary and Percy Shelley | Mary and Percy Shelley | Thomas De Quincey | Thomas De Quincey | Dickens | Dickens | Walter Pater | Walter Pater | Wilde | Wilde

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT) 21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT)

Description

This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald. This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Subjects

Media | film | Media | film | literature | literature | genre | genre | topic | topic | style | style | cinema | cinema | literary narrative | literary narrative | cultural | cultural | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | boundaries | boundaries | theory of narrative | theory of narrative | Akira Kurosawa | Akira Kurosawa | John Ford | John Ford | Francis Ford Coppolla | Francis Ford Coppolla | Clint Eastwood | Clint Eastwood | Orson Welles | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | Billy Wilder | Federico Fellini | Federico Fellini | Aeschylus | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Sophocles | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Cervantes | Cervantes | Honor? de Balzac | Honor? de Balzac | Henry James | Henry James | F. Scott Fitzgerald | F. Scott Fitzgerald

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.481 Victorian Literature and Culture (MIT) 21L.481 Victorian Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

The course covers British literature and culture during Queen Victoria's long reign, 1837-1901. This was the brilliant age of Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Lewis Carroll, George Eliot, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson – and many others. It was also the age of urbanization, steam power, class conflict, Darwin, religious crisis, imperial expansion, information explosion, bureaucratization – and much more. The course covers British literature and culture during Queen Victoria's long reign, 1837-1901. This was the brilliant age of Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Lewis Carroll, George Eliot, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson – and many others. It was also the age of urbanization, steam power, class conflict, Darwin, religious crisis, imperial expansion, information explosion, bureaucratization – and much more.

Subjects

English Literature | English Literature | Victorian | Victorian | Culture | Culture | Fiction | Fiction | Nonfiction | Nonfiction | Poetry | Poetry | Queen Victoria | Queen Victoria | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens | Bronte | Bronte | Lewis Carroll | Lewis Carroll | George Eliot | George Eliot | Robert Browning | Robert Browning | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Arthur Conan Doyle | Arthur Conan Doyle | Rudyard Kipling | Rudyard Kipling | Alfred Lord Tennyson | Alfred Lord Tennyson | Urbanization | Urbanization | Class conflict | Class conflict | Darwin | Darwin | Religion | Religion | Imperialism | Imperialism | Bureaucracy | Bureaucracy | British | British | Thomas Carlyle | Thomas Carlyle | John Ruskin | John Ruskin | Elizabeth Gaskell | Elizabeth Gaskell | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Henry Mayhew | Henry Mayhew | Isabella Beeton | Isabella Beeton

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT)

Description

At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho

Subjects

Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Authors | Authors | Literature | Literature | Shaw | Shaw | Isben | Isben

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT) 21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works. This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works.

Subjects

literature | literature | fiction | fiction | reading | reading | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Kate Chopin | Kate Chopin | Leo Tolstoy | Leo Tolstoy | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Nora Okja Keller | Nora Okja Keller | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | prose narrative | prose narrative | short stories | short stories | novels | novels | literary response | literary response | literary analysis | literary analysis | art | art | war | war | verbal texts | verbal texts | narrative styles | narrative styles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT)

Description

At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho

Subjects

Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Authors | Authors | Literature | Literature | Shaw | Shaw | Isben | Isben

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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s Women

Description

Sophie Duncan introduces Oscar Wilde by setting him in an accurate historical context. She then moves on to consider the revolutionary aspects of his four plays Lady Windermere's Fan, An Ideal Husband, A Woman of No Importance and The Importance of Being Earnest. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | women in performance | s Fan | The Importance of Being Earnest | drama | Victorian | Oscar Wilde | A Woman of No Importance | An Ideal Husband | s Fan | The Importance of Being Earnest | drama | Victorian | Oscar Wilde | A Woman of No Importance | An Ideal Husband

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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CMS.S61 Special Subject: The Rise of Film Noir (MIT) CMS.S61 Special Subject: The Rise of Film Noir (MIT)

Description

This class explores the development of Hollywood Film Noir. There will be a focus on émigré directors who moved to Hollywood when the Nazis rose to power. Assignments will include short response papers about three of the films in the series, and reports by students on examples of "neo-noir" films from recent decades.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This class explores the development of Hollywood Film Noir. There will be a focus on émigré directors who moved to Hollywood when the Nazis rose to power. Assignments will include short response papers about three of the films in the series, and reports by students on examples of "neo-noir" films from recent decades.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

film noir | film noir | music | music | film music | film music | Fritz Lang | Fritz Lang | Orson Welles | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | Billy Wilder | noir | noir | neo-noir | neo-noir

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S61 Special Subject: The Rise of Film Noir (MIT)

Description

This class explores the development of Hollywood Film Noir. There will be a focus on émigré directors who moved to Hollywood when the Nazis rose to power. Assignments will include short response papers about three of the films in the series, and reports by students on examples of "neo-noir" films from recent decades. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

film noir | music | film music | Fritz Lang | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | noir | neo-noir

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT)

Description

At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho

Subjects

Oscar Wilde | Authors | Literature | Shaw | Isben

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works.

Subjects

literature | fiction | reading | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Herman Melville | Kate Chopin | Leo Tolstoy | Virginia Woolf | Nora Okja Keller | Oscar Wilde | prose narrative | short stories | novels | literary response | literary analysis | art | war | verbal texts | narrative styles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Oxford historical characters

Description

five well known people with connections to Oxford. If you are wondering about Hitler and Mussolini - had they won the war it is thought that Oxford would be their choice as capital. These are illustrations for a book on Oxford by Paul Sullivan.

Subjects

Oxford Johnson Lewis Wilde Hitler Mussolini

License

Cartoon by Bob Pomfret, copyright Oxford Brookes University. This work is licenced under a Creative Commons Licence: Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk Cartoon by Bob Pomfret, copyright Oxford Brookes University. This work is licenced under a Creative Commons Licence: Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk

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Oxford historical characters

Description

five well known people with connections to Oxford. If you are wondering about Hitler and Mussolini - had they won the war it is thought that Oxford would be their choice as capital. These are illustrations for a book on Oxford by Paul Sullivan.

Subjects

Oxford Johnson Lewis Wilde Hitler Mussolini

License

Cartoon by Bob Pomfret, copyright Oxford Brookes University. This work is licenced under a Creative Commons Licence: Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk Cartoon by Bob Pomfret, copyright Oxford Brookes University. This work is licenced under a Creative Commons Licence: Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This is a second variation of the course. It includes a survey of a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors studied include Twain, Wilde, Shakespeare, and Cervantes. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows the student to produce a long writing assignment, in addition to several shorter pieces; it also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through student-led discussion, class reports, and class participation.

Subjects

Comedy | Satire | Greek | Twain | Wilde | Shakespeare | Writing | Literature | Communications | Cervantes | comedies | comic | funny | jokes | literature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Drama | Writing | Shakespeare | Twain | Wilde | Brecht | Nabokov | Heller | Chaucer | Milton | Allegory | Satire | comic | funny | jokes | literature | tales | satirical paintnigs | films | comedies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molire, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subjects

humor | drama | narrative | genre | literary history | irony | comic | slapstick | satire | wit | trickster | allegory | transgression | social commentary | political commentary | William Shakespeare | Aristophanes | Moliere | Aphra Behn | Jane Austen | Mark Twain | Oscar Wilde | Italo Calvino | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT)

Description

This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays.

Subjects

Extensive reading | major poets | evolution of each poet's work | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | recognition of beauty | justice | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | British literary authors | 19th century | literature | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | Wordsworth | Keats | Mary Robinson | Mary and Percy Shelley | Thomas De Quincey | Dickens | Walter Pater | Wilde

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT)

Description

This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Subjects

Media | film | literature | genre | topic | style | cinema | literary narrative | cultural | political | aesthetic | boundaries | theory of narrative | Akira Kurosawa | John Ford | Francis Ford Coppolla | Clint Eastwood | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | Federico Fellini | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Shakespeare | Cervantes | Honor? de Balzac | Henry James | F. Scott Fitzgerald

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.481 Victorian Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

The course covers British literature and culture during Queen Victoria's long reign, 1837-1901. This was the brilliant age of Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Lewis Carroll, George Eliot, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson – and many others. It was also the age of urbanization, steam power, class conflict, Darwin, religious crisis, imperial expansion, information explosion, bureaucratization – and much more.

Subjects

English Literature | Victorian | Culture | Fiction | Nonfiction | Poetry | Queen Victoria | Charles Dickens | Bronte | Lewis Carroll | George Eliot | Robert Browning | Oscar Wilde | Arthur Conan Doyle | Rudyard Kipling | Alfred Lord Tennyson | Urbanization | Class conflict | Darwin | Religion | Imperialism | Bureaucracy | British | Thomas Carlyle | John Ruskin | Elizabeth Gaskell | John Stuart Mill | Henry Mayhew | Isabella Beeton

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT)

Description

At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho

Subjects

Oscar Wilde | Authors | Literature | Shaw | Isben

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works.

Subjects

literature | fiction | reading | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Herman Melville | Kate Chopin | Leo Tolstoy | Virginia Woolf | Nora Okja Keller | Oscar Wilde | prose narrative | short stories | novels | literary response | literary analysis | art | war | verbal texts | narrative styles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S61 Special Subject: The Rise of Film Noir (MIT)

Description

This class explores the development of Hollywood Film Noir. There will be a focus on migr directors who moved to Hollywood when the Nazis rose to power. Assignments will include short response papers about three of the films in the series, and reports by students on examples of "neo-noir" films from recent decades.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

film noir | music | film music | Fritz Lang | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | noir | neo-noir

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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