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17.42 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT) 17.42 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT)

Description

The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. The topics covered include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes. The historical cases covered include World War I, World War II, Korea, Indochina, and the Peloponnesian, Crimean and Seven Years wars. The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. The topics covered include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes. The historical cases covered include World War I, World War II, Korea, Indochina, and the Peloponnesian, Crimean and Seven Years wars.

Subjects

war | war | foreign policy | foreign policy | World War I | World War I | World War II | World War II | Indochina | Indochina | Peloponnesian War | Peloponnesian War | Crimean War | Crimean War | Seven Years War | Seven Years War | conflict resolution | conflict resolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.423 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT) 17.423 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT)

Description

Course topic: the causes and prevention of interstate war.Course goal: discovering and assessing means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. Covered topics include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes.Covered historical cases include World War I, World War II, Korea, Indochina, and the Peloponnesian, Crimean and Seven Years wars. Course topic: the causes and prevention of interstate war.Course goal: discovering and assessing means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. Covered topics include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes.Covered historical cases include World War I, World War II, Korea, Indochina, and the Peloponnesian, Crimean and Seven Years wars.

Subjects

war | war | foreign policy | foreign policy | World War I | World War I | World War II | World War II | Indochina | Indochina | Peloponnesian War | Peloponnesian War | Crimean War | Crimean War | Seven Years War | Seven Years War | conflict resolution | conflict resolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.42 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT) 17.42 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT)

Description

The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. The topics covered include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes. The historical cases covered include the Peloponnesian and Seven Years wars, World War I, World War II, Korea, the Arab-Israel conflict, and the U.S.-Iraq and U.S. al-Queda wars. This is an undergraduate course, but it is open to graduate students. The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. The topics covered include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes. The historical cases covered include the Peloponnesian and Seven Years wars, World War I, World War II, Korea, the Arab-Israel conflict, and the U.S.-Iraq and U.S. al-Queda wars. This is an undergraduate course, but it is open to graduate students.

Subjects

war | war | cause | cause | prevention | prevention | World War I | World War I | World War II | World War II | Peloponnesian War | Peloponnesian War | Arab-Israel conflict | Arab-Israel conflict | Korean War | Korean War | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | escalation | escalation | weapons of mass destruction | weapons of mass destruction | military | military

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT) 17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT)

Description

This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra

Subjects

Strategy | Strategy | grand | grand | comparative | comparative | United States | United States | Great Britian | Great Britian | France | France | Germany | Germany | Russia | Russia | Europe | Europe | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | political | political | military | military | security | security | doctrine | doctrine | organizations | organizations | nationalism | nationalism | international | international | World War I | World War I | World War II | World War II | land warfare | land warfare | methods | methods | history | history | case study | case study

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT) 14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT)

Description

This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008. This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008.

Subjects

economic history | economic history | financial crises | financial crises | industrialization | industrialization | World War I | World War I | depression | depression | recovery | recovery | World War II | World War II | the Golden Age | the Golden Age | income inequality | income inequality | oil crises | oil crises | 1970s | 1970s | Japanese growth and stagnation | Japanese growth and stagnation | small crises | small crises | imbalance | imbalance | 2008 crisis | 2008 crisis | 2009 crisis | 2009 crisis | 1930s | 1930s | 1940s | 1940s

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT)

Description

At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern. At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | nobility | nobility | bourgeoisie | bourgeoisie | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Russo-Japanese War | Russo-Japanese War | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.126 America in Depression and War (MIT) 21H.126 America in Depression and War (MIT)

Description

The Great Depression and World War II permanently changed American politics and society. Topics include: the Great Crash, the New Deal, Roosevelt, the home front, the Normandy Invasion, and the atomic bomb. Explores those events through film, novels, newspapers, and other historical documents. The Great Depression and World War II permanently changed American politics and society. Topics include: the Great Crash, the New Deal, Roosevelt, the home front, the Normandy Invasion, and the atomic bomb. Explores those events through film, novels, newspapers, and other historical documents.

Subjects

Great Depression | Great Depression | World War II | World War II

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two. This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | Pugachev | Pugachev | nobility | nobility | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Chechnya | Chechnya | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Rasputin | Russia | Russia | social heritage | social heritage | cultural heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | autocracy | political reform | political reform | political revolution | political revolution | revolutionary | revolutionary | debates | debates | capitalism | capitalism | historical texts | historical texts | literary texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 19th century | 19th century | major European power | major European power | intellectual class | intellectual class | autocratic order | autocratic order | states | states | societies | societies | West | West | national consciousness | national consciousness | state | state | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Tizard Mission

Description

Stephen Phelps, Brasenose Alumnus, introduces his book about the top-secret operation that changed the course of World War II. Available now through Amazon or Pen and Sword. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

World War II | Brasenose College | united states | radar | Britain | Germany | military | technology | World War II | Brasenose College | united states | radar | Britain | Germany | military | technology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.951 Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: Past, Present and Future (MIT) 17.951 Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: Past, Present and Future (MIT)

Description

This course will expose students to tools and methods of analysis for use in assessing the challenges and dangers associated with nuclear weapons in international politics. The first two weeks of the course will look at the technology and design of nuclear weapons and their means of production. The next five weeks will look at the role they played in the Cold War, the organizations that managed them, the technologies that were developed to deliver them, and the methods used to analyze nuclear force structures and model nuclear exchanges. The last six weeks of the course will look at theories and cases of nuclear decision making beyond the original five weapon states, and will look particularly at why states pursue or forego nuclear weapons, the role that individuals and institutions play, This course will expose students to tools and methods of analysis for use in assessing the challenges and dangers associated with nuclear weapons in international politics. The first two weeks of the course will look at the technology and design of nuclear weapons and their means of production. The next five weeks will look at the role they played in the Cold War, the organizations that managed them, the technologies that were developed to deliver them, and the methods used to analyze nuclear force structures and model nuclear exchanges. The last six weeks of the course will look at theories and cases of nuclear decision making beyond the original five weapon states, and will look particularly at why states pursue or forego nuclear weapons, the role that individuals and institutions play,

Subjects

nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | war | war | politics | politics | World War II | World War II | Soviet Union | Soviet Union | Cold War | Cold War | Great Britain | Great Britain | France | France | China | China | India | India | Israel | Israel | Pakistan | Pakistan | North Korea | North Korea | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear disarmament | nuclear disarmament | security | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | engineering | engineering | hobbyist | hobbyist | communications | communications | Internet | Internet | machine age | machine age | Apollo program | Apollo program | biotechnology | biotechnology | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT) 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure. This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Supreme Court | Congress | Congress | constitutional law | constitutional law | racial profiling | racial profiling | wartime | wartime | affirmative action | affirmative action | constitutionality | constitutionality | civil rights | civil rights | civil liberties | civil liberties | roe | roe | wade | wade | economic liberties | economic liberties | desegregation | desegregation | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | fundamental rights | federalism | federalism | separation of powers | separation of powers | supreme court cases | supreme court cases | marbury | marbury | madison | madison | mccullough | mccullough | maryland | maryland | bush | bush | gore | gore | dred scott | dred scott | sanford | sanford | brown | brown | board of education | board of education | equal protection of the laws | equal protection of the laws | immigration | immigration | welfare | welfare | Eighth Amendment | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | poverty | criminal procedure | criminal procedure | World War II | World War II | Korean War | Korean War | post 9/11 america | post 9/11 america | judicial review | judicial review | religion | religion | citizenship | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Aftermath of World War II and the New Political Geography of Europe

Description

Modern European History Professor Paul Betts reflects on the legacy of World War II and its relevance to conflicts and crises today. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

World War II | refugees | borders | history | World War II | refugees | borders | history

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT) 21H.161 The Middle East in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities. This course surveys the history of the Middle East, from the end of the 19th century to the present. It examines major political, social, intellectual and cultural issues and practices. It also focuses on important events, movements, and ideas that prevailed during the last century and affect its current realities.

Subjects

Middle East | Middle East | history | history | Ottoman period | Ottoman period | imperialism | imperialism | nation-state | nation-state | Turkey | Turkey | Egypt | Egypt | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Israeli-Palestinian conflict | Islam | Islam | Iranian Revolution | Iranian Revolution | democracy | democracy | Orientalism | Orientalism | Western Imperialism | Western Imperialism | World War I | World War I | Great War | Great War | Nationalism | Nationalism | Israel | Israel | Palestine | Palestine | Islamic radicalism | Islamic radicalism | Hamas | Hamas | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Isis | Isis | Iraq | Iraq | Yezidis | Yezidis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.42 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT)

Description

The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. The topics covered include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes. The historical cases covered include World War I, World War II, Korea, Indochina, and the Peloponnesian, Crimean and Seven Years wars.

Subjects

war | foreign policy | World War I | World War II | Indochina | Peloponnesian War | Crimean War | Seven Years War | conflict resolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.423 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT)

Description

Course topic: the causes and prevention of interstate war.Course goal: discovering and assessing means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. Covered topics include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes.Covered historical cases include World War I, World War II, Korea, Indochina, and the Peloponnesian, Crimean and Seven Years wars.

Subjects

war | foreign policy | World War I | World War II | Indochina | Peloponnesian War | Crimean War | Seven Years War | conflict resolution

License

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14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT)

Description

This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008.

Subjects

economic history | financial crises | industrialization | World War I | depression | recovery | World War II | the Golden Age | income inequality | oil crises | 1970s | Japanese growth and stagnation | small crises | imbalance | 2008 crisis | 2009 crisis | 1930s | 1940s

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.42 Causes and Prevention of War (MIT)

Description

The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. The topics covered include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes. The historical cases covered include the Peloponnesian and Seven Years wars, World War I, World War II, Korea, the Arab-Israel conflict, and the U.S.-Iraq and U.S. al-Queda wars. This is an undergraduate course, but it is open to graduate students.

Subjects

war | cause | prevention | World War I | World War II | Peloponnesian War | Arab-Israel conflict | Korean War | nuclear weapons | escalation | weapons of mass destruction | military

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT)

Description

This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra

Subjects

Strategy | grand | comparative | United States | Great Britian | France | Germany | Russia | Europe | nineteenth century | twentieth century | political | military | security | doctrine | organizations | nationalism | international | World War I | World War II | land warfare | methods | history | case study

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.245J Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, 1917 to the Present (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and historical evolution of the Soviet state and society from the 1917 Revolution to the present. It covers the creation of a revolutionary regime, causes and nature of the Stalin revolution, post-Stalinist efforts to achieve political and social reform, and causes of the Soviet collapse. It also examines current developments in Russia in light of Soviet history.

Subjects

21H.245 | 17.57 | 21G.086 | Soviet Union | politics | society | Vladimir Putin | Imperial Russia | Russian Revolution | New Economic Policy | Gorbachev | Yeltsin | Lenin | Pobedonostsev | Marxism | October Manifesto | World War I | February Revolution | Romanov dynasty | Bolsheviks | Trotsky | October Revolution | Civil War | Red Army | Communism | Stalin | collectivization | industrialization | Gulag | Molotov-Ribbentrop pact | World War II | Novikov telegram | Khrushchev | Brezhnev | Alena Ledeneva | Putin | Kremlin | Medvedev | Ukraine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Congress | constitutional law | racial profiling | wartime | affirmative action | constitutionality | civil rights | civil liberties | roe | wade | economic liberties | desegregation | gender discrimination | gay marriage | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | federalism | separation of powers | supreme court cases | marbury | madison | mccullough | maryland | bush | gore | dred scott | sanford | brown | board of education | equal protection of the laws | immigration | welfare | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | criminal procedure | World War II | Korean War | post 9/11 america | judicial review | religion | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | Civil War | World War II | Cold War | industrialization | mass production | craftsmanship | transportation | Taylorism | aeronautics | systems approach | computers | control | automation | nature | popular culture | terrorism | engineering | hobbyist | communications | Internet | machine age | Apollo program | biotechnology | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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