Searching for abolition : 14 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln. This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subjects

American colonies | American colonies | Civil War | Civil War | Spanish colonization | Spanish colonization | British empire | British empire | American Revolution | American Revolution | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | U.S. Constitution | U.S. Constitution | ratification | ratification | secession | secession | Bill of Rights | Bill of Rights | John Winthrop | John Winthrop | Thomas Paine | Thomas Paine | Thomas Jefferson | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | James Madison | William H. Garrison | William H. Garrison | George Fitzhugh | George Fitzhugh | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Abraham Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | Andrew Jackson | Andrew Jackson | George Mason | George Mason | abolition | abolition | Federalism | Federalism | slavery | slavery | Constitutional Convention | Constitutional Convention

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

RES.8-004 Reducing the Danger of Nuclear Weapons and Proliferation (MIT) RES.8-004 Reducing the Danger of Nuclear Weapons and Proliferation (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course, organized as a series of lectures, aims to provide an interdisciplinary view of the history and current climate of nuclear weapons and non-proliferation policy. The first lecture begins the series by discusses nuclear developments in one of the world's most likely nuclear flash points, and the second lecture presents a broad discussion of the dangers of current nuclear weapons policies as well as evaluations of current situations and an outlook for future nuclear weapons reductions. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course, organized as a series of lectures, aims to provide an interdisciplinary view of the history and current climate of nuclear weapons and non-proliferation policy. The first lecture begins the series by discusses nuclear developments in one of the world's most likely nuclear flash points, and the second lecture presents a broad discussion of the dangers of current nuclear weapons policies as well as evaluations of current situations and an outlook for future nuclear weapons reductions.

Subjects

nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | south asia | south asia | deterrence theory | deterrence theory | india | india | pakistan | pakistan | kargil war | kargil war | operation parakram | operation parakram | nuclear war | nuclear war | abolition | abolition | obama | obama | bomb | bomb | cold war | cold war | escalation | escalation | treaty | treaty | deterrence | deterrence | missiles | missiles | disarmament | disarmament

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.445J Slavery and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century (MIT) 21A.445J Slavery and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century (MIT)

Description

This course explores the issue of human trafficking for forced labour and sexual slavery, focusing on its representation in recent scholarly accounts and advocacy as well as in other media. Ethnographic and fictional readings along with media analysis help to develop a contextualized and comparative understanding of the phenomena in both past and present contexts. It examines the wide range of factors and agents that enable these practices, such as technology, cultural practices, social and economic conditions, and the role of governments and international organizations. The course also discusses the analytical, moral and methodological questions of researching, writing, and representing trafficking and slavery. This course explores the issue of human trafficking for forced labour and sexual slavery, focusing on its representation in recent scholarly accounts and advocacy as well as in other media. Ethnographic and fictional readings along with media analysis help to develop a contextualized and comparative understanding of the phenomena in both past and present contexts. It examines the wide range of factors and agents that enable these practices, such as technology, cultural practices, social and economic conditions, and the role of governments and international organizations. The course also discusses the analytical, moral and methodological questions of researching, writing, and representing trafficking and slavery.

Subjects

21A.445 | 21A.445 | WGS.272 | WGS.272 | slavery | slavery | human trafficking | human trafficking | sex | sex | gender | gender | human rights | human rights | race | race | capitalism | capitalism | labor exploitation | labor exploitation | public health | public health | violence | violence | child labor | child labor | organ trafficking | organ trafficking | sexual violence | sexual violence | prostitution | prostitution | white slavery | white slavery | abolitionism | abolitionism | migration | migration | border crossings | border crossings | border policing | border policing | conflict zones | conflict zones | reproductive labor | reproductive labor | sex work | sex work | technology and trafficking | technology and trafficking

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

"For Salt River...Direct Through Without Landing" Newspaper Clipping, ca. 1856

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: "For Salt River...Direct Through Without Landing" Newspaper Clipping, ca. 1856 Election Year: 1856 Date Made: ca. 1856 Measurement: Clipping: 4.5 x 2.75 in.; 11.43 x 6.985 cm Classification: Ephemera Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/61fb There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | clippings | frémontjohncharles | sumnercharles | greeleyhorace | politics | saltriver | satire | steamboats | beecherhenryward | sewardwilliamhenry | douglassfrederick | unity | officersadministrators | politicians | journalists | clergy | abolitionists | slavery | racerelations | culidentifier:value=2214pm0108 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

Cornell University Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The American Renaissance

Description

The “American Renaissance,” a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the period’s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (English Literature 405)

Subjects

american literature | american renaissance | romanticism | transcendentalism | whitman | dickinson | hawthorne | melville | emerson | thoreau | abolitionism | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900

Description

This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (History 311)

Subjects

history | slavery | slave trade | africa | abolition | empires | voyages | new world | middle passage | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Class Wargames interview with Kimathi Donkor

Description

An interview with artist Kimathi Donkor about his painting "Toussaint L'Ouverture at Bedourete" which depicts the Haitian Revolution against the French and Spanish colonialist rulers in 1804

Subjects

painting artist | art | rebellion | abolitionism | black culture | colonialists | colonialism | revolution | history | presence | heritage | kimathi donkor | haitian revolution | haiti | black african | black history | black history month | bhm | british asian history | british asians | black britons | black leaders | black artists | black activists | black photographers | black communities | black and asian presence | black business | black entrepreneurship | black scholarship | black integration | black identity | black civil rights | african | asian | britain | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.445J Slavery and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century (MIT)

Description

This course explores the issue of human trafficking for forced labour and sexual slavery, focusing on its representation in recent scholarly accounts and advocacy as well as in other media. Ethnographic and fictional readings along with media analysis help to develop a contextualized and comparative understanding of the phenomena in both past and present contexts. It examines the wide range of factors and agents that enable these practices, such as technology, cultural practices, social and economic conditions, and the role of governments and international organizations. The course also discusses the analytical, moral and methodological questions of researching, writing, and representing trafficking and slavery.

Subjects

21A.445 | WGS.272 | slavery | human trafficking | sex | gender | human rights | race | capitalism | labor exploitation | public health | violence | child labor | organ trafficking | sexual violence | prostitution | white slavery | abolitionism | migration | border crossings | border policing | conflict zones | reproductive labor | sex work | technology and trafficking

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subjects

American colonies | Civil War | Spanish colonization | British empire | American Revolution | Declaration of Independence | U.S. Constitution | ratification | secession | Bill of Rights | John Winthrop | Thomas Paine | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | William H. Garrison | George Fitzhugh | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Abraham Lincoln | Frederick Douglass | Andrew Jackson | George Mason | abolition | Federalism | slavery | Constitutional Convention

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature analysis | political theory | oratory | autobiography | poetry | science fiction | war | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Blake | Williams | Civil War | abolition | Stowe | Whitman | Lincoln | Lowell | Walcott | Ondaatje | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

RES.8-004 Reducing the Danger of Nuclear Weapons and Proliferation (MIT)

Description

This course, organized as a series of lectures, aims to provide an interdisciplinary view of the history and current climate of nuclear weapons and non-proliferation policy. The first lecture begins the series by discusses nuclear developments in one of the world's most likely nuclear flash points, and the second lecture presents a broad discussion of the dangers of current nuclear weapons policies as well as evaluations of current situations and an outlook for future nuclear weapons reductions.

Subjects

nuclear proliferation | nuclear weapons | south asia | deterrence theory | india | pakistan | kargil war | operation parakram | nuclear war | abolition | obama | bomb | cold war | escalation | treaty | deterrence | missiles | disarmament

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature analysis | political theory | oratory | autobiography | poetry | science fiction | war | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Blake | Williams | Civil War | abolition | Stowe | Whitman | Lincoln | Lowell | Walcott | Ondaatje | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata