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12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT) 12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT)

Description

The development of the Global Positioning System (GPS) started in the 1960s, and the system became operational in 1992. The system has seen many diverse applications develop in the last few years with the accuracy of positioning ranging from 100 meters (the civilian restricted accuracy requirement) to 1 millimeter (without the need for a security clearance!) In this course we will apply many of basic principles of science and mathematics learnt at MIT to explore the applications and principles of GPS. We also use GPS and other equipment in the class (and outside on Campus) to demonstrate the uses of this system.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .f files found on this course site. Please refer to the The development of the Global Positioning System (GPS) started in the 1960s, and the system became operational in 1992. The system has seen many diverse applications develop in the last few years with the accuracy of positioning ranging from 100 meters (the civilian restricted accuracy requirement) to 1 millimeter (without the need for a security clearance!) In this course we will apply many of basic principles of science and mathematics learnt at MIT to explore the applications and principles of GPS. We also use GPS and other equipment in the class (and outside on Campus) to demonstrate the uses of this system.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .f files found on this course site. Please refer to the

Subjects

Global Positioning | Global Positioning | Global Positioning System | Global Positioning System | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirment | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirment | basic principles | basic principles | science | science | mathematics | mathematics | GPS | GPS | navigation | navigation | accuracy | accuracy | civilian | civilian | application | application | coordinate systems | coordinate systems | lattitude | lattitude | longitude | longitude | deformable | deformable | Earth | Earth | estimation | estimation | aircraft | aircraft | stochastic | stochastic | mathematical | mathematical | models | models | statistics | statistics | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | pseudorange | pseudorange | phase measurements | phase measurements | celestial | celestial | sattelite | sattelite | astronomical observations | astronomical observations | radio | radio | ship | ship | automobile | automobile

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.540 Principles of the Global Positioning System (MIT) 12.540 Principles of the Global Positioning System (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the principles of the Global Positioning System and to demonstrate its application to various aspects of Earth Sciences. The specific content of the course depends each year on the interests of the students in the class. In some cases, the class interests are towards the geophysical applications of GPS and we concentrate on high precision(millimeter level) positioning on regional and global scales. In other cases, the interests have been more toward engineering applications of kinematic positioning with GPS in which case the concentration is on positioning with slightly less accuracy but being able to do so for a moving object. In all cases, we concentrate on the fundamen The aim of this course is to introduce the principles of the Global Positioning System and to demonstrate its application to various aspects of Earth Sciences. The specific content of the course depends each year on the interests of the students in the class. In some cases, the class interests are towards the geophysical applications of GPS and we concentrate on high precision(millimeter level) positioning on regional and global scales. In other cases, the interests have been more toward engineering applications of kinematic positioning with GPS in which case the concentration is on positioning with slightly less accuracy but being able to do so for a moving object. In all cases, we concentrate on the fundamen

Subjects

Global Positioning System | Global Positioning System | Earth Sciences | Earth Sciences | geophysical applications | geophysical applications | GPS | GPS | engineering applications | engineering applications | kinematic positioning | kinematic positioning | precision | precision | accuracy | accuracy | moving objects | moving objects | coordinate | coordinate | time | time | systems | systems | satellite | satellite | geodetic | geodetic | orbital | orbital | motions | motions | pseudo ranges | pseudo ranges | carrier phases | carrier phases | stochastic | stochastic | mathematics | mathematics | models | models | data | data | analysis | analysis | estimation | estimation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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13.002J Introduction to Numeric Analysis for Engineering (MIT) 13.002J Introduction to Numeric Analysis for Engineering (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability. Error propagation and stability. The solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques. Roots of equations and systems of equations. Numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration. Fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations. Error and convergence analysis. Subject taught first half of term.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. An introduction to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability. Error propagation and stability. The solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques. Roots of equations and systems of equations. Numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration. Fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations. Error and convergence analysis. Subject taught first half of term.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

digital computing | digital computing | algorithm accuracy | algorithm accuracy | error propagation | error propagation | linear equations | linear equations | iterative techniques | iterative techniques | roots of equations | roots of equations | systems of equations | systems of equations | numerical interpolation | numerical interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | finite-difference solutions | finite-difference solutions | differential equations | differential equations | 10.002J | 10.002J | 13.002 | 13.002 | 10.002 | 10.002

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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PE.730 Archery (MIT) PE.730 Archery (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This 12 session course is designed for the beginning or novice archer and uses recurve indoor target bows and equipment. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic techniques of indoor target archery emphasizing the care and use of equipment, range safety, stance and shooting techniques, scoring and competition. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This 12 session course is designed for the beginning or novice archer and uses recurve indoor target bows and equipment. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic techniques of indoor target archery emphasizing the care and use of equipment, range safety, stance and shooting techniques, scoring and competition.

Subjects

archery | archery | bow | bow | arrow | arrow | stringing | stringing | tourney | tourney | technique | technique | release | release | aim | aim | firing | firing | grouping | grouping | clusters | clusters | safety | safety | stretching | stretching | video | video | high speed video | high speed video | stance | stance | sighting | sighting | speed shooting | speed shooting | balance | balance | musculature | musculature | tournaments | tournaments | distance | distance | accuracy | accuracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.993J Introduction to Numerical Analysis for Engineering (13.002J) (MIT) 2.993J Introduction to Numerical Analysis for Engineering (13.002J) (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to undergraduates and introduces students to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Topics covered include: fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability, error propagation and stability, the solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques, roots of equations and systems of equations, numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration, fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations, and error and convergence analysis. The subject is taught the first half of the term. This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.002J. In 2005, ocean engineering This course is offered to undergraduates and introduces students to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Topics covered include: fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability, error propagation and stability, the solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques, roots of equations and systems of equations, numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration, fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations, and error and convergence analysis. The subject is taught the first half of the term. This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.002J. In 2005, ocean engineering

Subjects

digital computing | digital computing | algorithm accuracy | algorithm accuracy | error propagation | error propagation | linear equations | linear equations | iterative techniques | iterative techniques | roots of equations | roots of equations | systems of equations | systems of equations | numerical interpolation | numerical interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | finite-difference solutions | finite-difference solutions | differential equations | differential equations | convergence analysis | convergence analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT) 12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the concepts and applications of navigation techniques using celestial bodies and satellite positioning systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Topics include astronomical observations, radio navigation systems, the relationship between conventional navigation results and those obtained from GPS, and the effects of the security systems, Selective Availability, and anti-spoofing on GPS results. Laboratory sessions cover the use of sextants, astronomical telescopes, and field use of GPS. Application areas covered include ship, automobile, and aircraft navigation and positioning, including very precise positioning applications. This course introduces the concepts and applications of navigation techniques using celestial bodies and satellite positioning systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Topics include astronomical observations, radio navigation systems, the relationship between conventional navigation results and those obtained from GPS, and the effects of the security systems, Selective Availability, and anti-spoofing on GPS results. Laboratory sessions cover the use of sextants, astronomical telescopes, and field use of GPS. Application areas covered include ship, automobile, and aircraft navigation and positioning, including very precise positioning applications.

Subjects

Global Positioning System | Global Positioning System | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirement | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirement | basic principles | basic principles | science | science | mathematics | mathematics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT)

Description

The development of the Global Positioning System (GPS) started in the 1960s, and the system became operational in 1992. The system has seen many diverse applications develop in the last few years with the accuracy of positioning ranging from 100 meters (the civilian restricted accuracy requirement) to 1 millimeter (without the need for a security clearance!) In this course we will apply many of basic principles of science and mathematics learnt at MIT to explore the applications and principles of GPS. We also use GPS and other equipment in the class (and outside on Campus) to demonstrate the uses of this system.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .f files found on this course site. Please refer to the

Subjects

Global Positioning | Global Positioning System | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirment | basic principles | science | mathematics | GPS | navigation | accuracy | civilian | application | coordinate systems | lattitude | longitude | deformable | Earth | estimation | aircraft | stochastic | mathematical | models | statistics | dynamic systems | pseudorange | phase measurements | celestial | sattelite | astronomical observations | radio | ship | automobile

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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TALAT Lecture 3208: The Finishing of Castings

Description

This lecture provides an introduction to some of the finer points in the production of high quality castings. The students will be able to understand the various processes for sealing porosity in badly made castings and to appreciate factors influencing the accuracy of castings, including a basic understanding of how to control and measure casting dimensions. Basic understanding of the foundry industry is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | machining | forming | casting | leakage | pressure testing | leaking castings | impregnation | accuracy | controlling factors | datum planes | heat treatment | mechanical properties | residual stresses | corrosion resistance | machinability | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the concepts and applications of navigation techniques using celestial bodies and satellite positioning systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Topics include astronomical observations, radio navigation systems, the relationship between conventional navigation results and those obtained from GPS, and the effects of the security systems, Selective Availability, and anti-spoofing on GPS results. Laboratory sessions cover the use of sextants, astronomical telescopes, and field use of GPS. Application areas covered include ship, automobile, and aircraft navigation and positioning, including very precise positioning applications.

Subjects

Global Positioning System | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirement | basic principles | science | mathematics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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PE.730 Archery (MIT)

Description

This 12 session course is designed for the beginning or novice archer and uses recurve indoor target bows and equipment. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic techniques of indoor target archery emphasizing the care and use of equipment, range safety, stance and shooting techniques, scoring and competition.

Subjects

archery | bow | arrow | stringing | tourney | technique | release | aim | firing | grouping | clusters | safety | stretching | video | high speed video | stance | sighting | speed shooting | balance | musculature | tournaments | distance | accuracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.993J Introduction to Numerical Analysis for Engineering (13.002J) (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to undergraduates and introduces students to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Topics covered include: fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability, error propagation and stability, the solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques, roots of equations and systems of equations, numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration, fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations, and error and convergence analysis. The subject is taught the first half of the term. This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.002J. In 2005, ocean engineering

Subjects

digital computing | algorithm accuracy | error propagation | linear equations | iterative techniques | roots of equations | systems of equations | numerical interpolation | differentiation | integration | finite-difference solutions | differential equations | convergence analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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TALAT Lecture 3208: The Finishing of Castings

Description

This lecture provides an introduction to some of the finer points in the production of high quality castings. The students will be able to understand the various processes for sealing porosity in badly made castings and to appreciate factors influencing the accuracy of castings, including a basic understanding of how to control and measure casting dimensions. Basic understanding of the foundry industry is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | machining | forming | casting | leakage | pressure testing | leaking castings | impregnation | accuracy | controlling factors | datum planes | heat treatment | mechanical properties | residual stresses | corrosion resistance | machinability | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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InfosmART: Information Skills for Creatives

Description

InfosmART is the Glasgow School of Art Library's award-winning portfolio of easy-to-follow interactive modules in information, study and research skills. All InfosmART modules are self-directed, so you can follow each module from start to finish, or dip in and out when you need specific information. All InfosmART content is written in easy-to-understand language and is designed for you to work through at your own pace.

Subjects

information literacy | study skills | research | literature review | search | browse | Google | currency | authority | relevance | methodology | accuracy | objectivity | peer review | Wikipedia | bibliography | endnote | footnote | citation | referencing | copyright

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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12.540 Principles of the Global Positioning System (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the principles of the Global Positioning System and to demonstrate its application to various aspects of Earth Sciences. The specific content of the course depends each year on the interests of the students in the class. In some cases, the class interests are towards the geophysical applications of GPS and we concentrate on high precision(millimeter level) positioning on regional and global scales. In other cases, the interests have been more toward engineering applications of kinematic positioning with GPS in which case the concentration is on positioning with slightly less accuracy but being able to do so for a moving object. In all cases, we concentrate on the fundamen

Subjects

Global Positioning System | Earth Sciences | geophysical applications | GPS | engineering applications | kinematic positioning | precision | accuracy | moving objects | coordinate | time | systems | satellite | geodetic | orbital | motions | pseudo ranges | carrier phases | stochastic | mathematics | models | data | analysis | estimation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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13.002J Introduction to Numeric Analysis for Engineering (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability. Error propagation and stability. The solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques. Roots of equations and systems of equations. Numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration. Fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations. Error and convergence analysis. Subject taught first half of term.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

digital computing | algorithm accuracy | error propagation | linear equations | iterative techniques | roots of equations | systems of equations | numerical interpolation | differentiation | integration | finite-difference solutions | differential equations | 10.002J | 13.002 | 10.002

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.993J Introduction to Numerical Analysis for Engineering (13.002J) (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to undergraduates and introduces students to the formulation, methodology, and techniques for numerical solution of engineering problems. Topics covered include: fundamental principles of digital computing and the implications for algorithm accuracy and stability, error propagation and stability, the solution of systems of linear equations, including direct and iterative techniques, roots of equations and systems of equations, numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration, fundamentals of finite-difference solutions to ordinary differential equations, and error and convergence analysis. The subject is taught the first half of the term. This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.002J. In 2005, ocean engineering

Subjects

digital computing | algorithm accuracy | error propagation | linear equations | iterative techniques | roots of equations | systems of equations | numerical interpolation | differentiation | integration | finite-difference solutions | differential equations | convergence analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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PE.730 Archery (MIT)

Description

This 12 session course is designed for the beginning or novice archer and uses recurve indoor target bows and equipment. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic techniques of indoor target archery emphasizing the care and use of equipment, range safety, stance and shooting techniques, scoring and competition.

Subjects

archery | bow | arrow | stringing | tourney | technique | release | aim | firing | grouping | clusters | safety | stretching | video | high speed video | stance | sighting | speed shooting | balance | musculature | tournaments | distance | accuracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.215 Modern Navigation (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the concepts and applications of navigation techniques using celestial bodies and satellite positioning systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Topics include astronomical observations, radio navigation systems, the relationship between conventional navigation results and those obtained from GPS, and the effects of the security systems, Selective Availability, and anti-spoofing on GPS results. Laboratory sessions cover the use of sextants, astronomical telescopes, and field use of GPS. Application areas covered include ship, automobile, and aircraft navigation and positioning, including very precise positioning applications.

Subjects

Global Positioning System | GPScivilian restricted accuracy requirement | basic principles | science | mathematics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.90 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to numerical methods and computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques covered include numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; numerical discretization of partial differential equations; and probabilistic methods for quantifying the impact of variability. Specific emphasis is given to finite volume methods in fluid mechanics, and finite element methods in structural mechanics.Acknowledgement: Prof. David Darmofal taught this course in prior years, and created some of the materials found in this OCW site.

Subjects

numerical integration | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite volume | finite element | discretization | PDEs | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | optimization | computational methods | aerospace engineering | Monte Carlo | Fourier stability analysis | Matrix stability analysis | Runge-Kutta | convergence | accuracy | stiffness | weighted residual | statistical sampling | sensitivity analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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