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2.019 Design of Ocean Systems (MIT) 2.019 Design of Ocean Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles, environment, materials and construction for ocean use, electronics, sensors, and actuators. Student teams work within schedule and budget, setting goals, reviewing progress, and making regular and final presentations. Instruction and practice occur in oral and written communication. This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles, environment, materials and construction for ocean use, electronics, sensors, and actuators. Student teams work within schedule and budget, setting goals, reviewing progress, and making regular and final presentations. Instruction and practice occur in oral and written communication.

Subjects

hydrodynamics | hydrodynamics | power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles | power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles | environment | environment | electronics | electronics | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | sea-keeping | sea-keeping | hull strength | hull strength | physics of acoustics | physics of acoustics | resistance | resistance | propulsion | propulsion | control surfaces | control surfaces | dynamics | dynamics | feedback control | feedback control | graphical information systems | graphical information systems | GIS | GIS

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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13.017 Design of Ocean Systems I (MIT) 13.017 Design of Ocean Systems I (MIT)

Description

A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation of the system, including demonstration of its operation in the marine environment. Spring Term: Introduction to the design process and its application to ocean engineering. Design project with students developing system definition and completing its preliminary design. Students are instructed in the design process, embedded systems programming and interfacing techniques, sensors, actuators, and the control of marine systems. Communications skills are honed through written and oral reports and engineering ethics are discussed. Fall Term: Students work as a group to desig A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation of the system, including demonstration of its operation in the marine environment. Spring Term: Introduction to the design process and its application to ocean engineering. Design project with students developing system definition and completing its preliminary design. Students are instructed in the design process, embedded systems programming and interfacing techniques, sensors, actuators, and the control of marine systems. Communications skills are honed through written and oral reports and engineering ethics are discussed. Fall Term: Students work as a group to desig

Subjects

design process | design process | model-scale ocean system | model-scale ocean system | operation in marine environment | operation in marine environment | system definition | system definition | preliminary design | preliminary design | embedded systems programming | embedded systems programming | interfacing techniques | interfacing techniques | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | marine systems | marine systems | engineering ethics | engineering ethics | system specification | system specification | group dynamics | group dynamics | time management | time management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.019 Design of Ocean Systems I (13.017) (MIT) 2.019 Design of Ocean Systems I (13.017) (MIT)

Description

A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation of the system, including demonstration of its operation in the marine environment. Spring Term: Introduction to the design process and its application to ocean engineering. Design project with students developing system definition and completing its preliminary design. Students are instructed in the design process, embedded systems programming and interfacing techniques, sensors, actuators, and the control of marine systems. Communications skills are honed through written and oral reports and engineering ethics are discussed. Fall Term: Students work as a group to desig A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation of the system, including demonstration of its operation in the marine environment. Spring Term: Introduction to the design process and its application to ocean engineering. Design project with students developing system definition and completing its preliminary design. Students are instructed in the design process, embedded systems programming and interfacing techniques, sensors, actuators, and the control of marine systems. Communications skills are honed through written and oral reports and engineering ethics are discussed. Fall Term: Students work as a group to desig

Subjects

design process | design process | model-scale ocean system | model-scale ocean system | operation in marine environment | operation in marine environment | system definition | system definition | preliminary design | preliminary design | embedded systems programming | embedded systems programming | interfacing techniques | interfacing techniques | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | marine systems | marine systems | engineering ethics | engineering ethics | system specification | system specification | group dynamics | group dynamics | time management | time management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | electromagnetic fields | electromagnetic fields | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | devices and circuits | devices and circuits | static and quasistatic fields | static and quasistatic fields | electromagnetic forces | electromagnetic forces | actuators | actuators | sensors | sensors | TEM lines | TEM lines | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | antennas | antennas | radiation | radiation | optical communications | optical communications | acoustics | acoustics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.75 Precision Machine Design (MIT) 2.75 Precision Machine Design (MIT)

Description

Intensive coverage of precision engineering theory, heuristics, and applications pertaining to the design of systems ranging from consumer products to machine tools. Topics covered include: economics, project management, and design philosophy; principles of accuracy, repeatability, and resolution; error budgeting; sensors; sensor mounting; systems design; bearings; actuators and transmissions; system integration driven by functional requirements, and operating physics. Emphasis on developing creative designs, which are optimized by analytical techniques applied via spreadsheets. This is a projects course with lectures consisting of design teams presenting their work and the class helping to develop solutions; thereby everyone learning from everyone's projects. Intensive coverage of precision engineering theory, heuristics, and applications pertaining to the design of systems ranging from consumer products to machine tools. Topics covered include: economics, project management, and design philosophy; principles of accuracy, repeatability, and resolution; error budgeting; sensors; sensor mounting; systems design; bearings; actuators and transmissions; system integration driven by functional requirements, and operating physics. Emphasis on developing creative designs, which are optimized by analytical techniques applied via spreadsheets. This is a projects course with lectures consisting of design teams presenting their work and the class helping to develop solutions; thereby everyone learning from everyone's projects.

Subjects

precision engineering theory | precision engineering theory | heuristics | heuristics | systems design | systems design | economics | economics | project management | project management | design philosophy | design philosophy | error budgeting | error budgeting | bearings | bearings | actuators | actuators | transmissions | transmissions | system integration | system integration | functional requirements | functional requirements | operating physics | operating physics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT) 6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | microsystem design | material properties | material properties | microfabrication technologies | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | structural behavior | sensing methods | sensing methods | fluid flow | fluid flow | microscale transport | microscale transport | noise | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | sensing/control systems | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | inertial sensors | sensitivity | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process | realistic microfabrication process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems (MIT) 2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

This course develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. Topics covered include analysis in time and frequency domains; design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping); describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems; extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers; discrete and digital hybrid systems and use of z-plane design. Students will complete an extended design case study. Students taking the graduate version (2.140) will attend the recitation sessions and complete additional assignments. This course develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. Topics covered include analysis in time and frequency domains; design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping); describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems; extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers; discrete and digital hybrid systems and use of z-plane design. Students will complete an extended design case study. Students taking the graduate version (2.140) will attend the recitation sessions and complete additional assignments.

Subjects

feedback loops | feedback loops | control systems | control systems | compensation | compensation | Bode plots | Bode plots | Nyquist plots | Nyquist plots | state space | state space | frequency domain | frequency domain | time domain | time domain | transfer functions | transfer functions | Laplace transform | Laplace transform | root locus | root locus | op-amps | op-amps | gears | gears | motors | motors | actuators | actuators | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | stability theory | stability theory | dynamic feedback | dynamic feedback | mechanical engineering problem archive | mechanical engineering problem archive

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.S06 Practical Electronics (MIT) EC.S06 Practical Electronics (MIT)

Description

You can build a wide range of practical electronic devices if you understand a few basic electronics concepts and follow some simple rules. These devices include light-activated and sound-activated toys and appliances, remote controls, timers and clocks, and motorized devices. The subject begins with an overview of the fundamental concepts, followed by a series of laboratory exercises that demonstrate the basic rules, and a final project. You can build a wide range of practical electronic devices if you understand a few basic electronics concepts and follow some simple rules. These devices include light-activated and sound-activated toys and appliances, remote controls, timers and clocks, and motorized devices. The subject begins with an overview of the fundamental concepts, followed by a series of laboratory exercises that demonstrate the basic rules, and a final project.

Subjects

Electronics | Electronics | circuit | circuit | analog circuits | analog circuits | testing circuits | testing circuits | bridge circuits | bridge circuits | passive components | passive components | resistors | resistors | diodes | diodes | capacitors | capacitors | filters | filters | flip-flops | flip-flops | relays | relays | transistors | transistors | switches | switches | rectifiers | rectifiers | function generators | function generators | comparators | comparators | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | op-amps | op-amps | timing circuits | timing circuits | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | electronics | electronics | SP.764 | SP.764 | SP.765 | SP.765

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems (MIT) 2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

This course develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. It covers analysis in time and frequency domains; design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping); describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems; extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers; discrete and digital hybrid systems and the use of z-plane design. Assignments include extended design case studies and capstone group projects. Graduate students are expected to complete additional assignments. This course develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. It covers analysis in time and frequency domains; design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping); describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems; extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers; discrete and digital hybrid systems and the use of z-plane design. Assignments include extended design case studies and capstone group projects. Graduate students are expected to complete additional assignments.

Subjects

feedback loops | feedback loops | compensation | compensation | Bode plots | Bode plots | Nyquist plots | Nyquist plots | state space | state space | frequency domain | frequency domain | time domain | time domain | transfer functions | transfer functions | Laplace transform | Laplace transform | root locus | root locus | op-amps | op-amps | gears | gears | motors | motors | actuators | actuators | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | stability theory | stability theory | control systems | control systems | dynamic feedback | dynamic feedback | mechanical engineering problem archive | mechanical engineering problem archive

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

This course develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. It covers analysis in time and frequency domains; design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping); describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems; extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers; discrete and digital hybrid systems and the use of z-plane design. Assignments include extended design case studies and capstone group projects. Graduate students are expected to complete additional assignments.

Subjects

feedback loops | compensation | Bode plots | Nyquist plots | state space | frequency domain | time domain | transfer functions | Laplace transform | root locus | op-amps | gears | motors | actuators | nonlinear systems | stability theory | control systems | dynamic feedback | mechanical engineering problem archive

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.764 Practical Electronics (MIT)

Description

You can build a wide range of practical electronic devices if you understand a few basic electronics concepts and follow some simple rules. These devices include light-activated and sound-activated toys and appliances, remote controls, timers and clocks, and motorized devices. The subject begins with an overview of the fundamental concepts, followed by a series of laboratory exercises that demonstrate the basic rules, and a final project.

Subjects

Electronics | circuit | analog circuits | testing circuits | bridge circuits | passive components | resistors | diodes | capacitors | filters | flip-flops | relays | transistors | switches | rectifiers | function generators | comparators | operational amplifiers | op-amps | timing circuits | sensors | actuators | electronics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetic fields | electrodynamics | devices and circuits | static and quasistatic fields | electromagnetic forces | actuators | sensors | TEM lines | electromagnetic waves | antennas | radiation | optical communications | acoustics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.S06 Practical Electronics (MIT)

Description

You can build a wide range of practical electronic devices if you understand a few basic electronics concepts and follow some simple rules. These devices include light-activated and sound-activated toys and appliances, remote controls, timers and clocks, and motorized devices. The subject begins with an overview of the fundamental concepts, followed by a series of laboratory exercises that demonstrate the basic rules, and a final project.

Subjects

Electronics | circuit | analog circuits | testing circuits | bridge circuits | passive components | resistors | diodes | capacitors | filters | flip-flops | relays | transistors | switches | rectifiers | function generators | comparators | operational amplifiers | op-amps | timing circuits | sensors | actuators | electronics | SP.764 | SP.765

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DG3134 Applications of Programmable Logic Controllers

Description

The aim of this unit is to introduce you to programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and examine where and why they are used. The unit explores what a PLC is and gives examples and solution programs. The teaching pack is written in three sections to coincide with the three learning outcomes and Higher National Unit Specifications of the Scottish Qualifications Authority. The first section gives a brief overview of what PLCs are and why they are used before explaining their basic architecture. Section 2 describes the operation of basic software commands and allows you to use these within simple programs. The third section uses the knowledge gained in the previous sections to allow you to develop programs to simulate the control of industrial processes. Outcomes There are three learning outcome

Subjects

DG31 34 | relay | Hard-wired systems | Sensors | actuators | PLC subsystems | PLC applications | Basic logic functions | PLC architecture | PLC failures | PLC classification | Normally open and closed contact | Auxiliary relay | Shift registers | Program execution | X: Engineering | ENGINEERING | SCQF Level 7

License

Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Scottish Qualification Authority (SQA), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG) and SQA, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Scottish Qualification Authority (SQA), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG) and SQA, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17761/LicenceSQAMaterialsCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17761/LicenceSQAMaterialsCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 SQA SQA

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2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

This course develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. It covers analysis in time and frequency domains; design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping); describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems; extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers; discrete and digital hybrid systems and the use of z-plane design. Assignments include extended design case studies and capstone group projects. Graduate students are expected to complete additional assignments.

Subjects

feedback loops | compensation | Bode plots | Nyquist plots | state space | frequency domain | time domain | transfer functions | Laplace transform | root locus | op-amps | gears | motors | actuators | nonlinear systems | stability theory | control systems | dynamic feedback | mechanical engineering problem archive

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.019 Design of Ocean Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles, environment, materials and construction for ocean use, electronics, sensors, and actuators. Student teams work within schedule and budget, setting goals, reviewing progress, and making regular and final presentations. Instruction and practice occur in oral and written communication.

Subjects

hydrodynamics | power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles | environment | electronics | sensors | actuators | sea-keeping | hull strength | physics of acoustics | resistance | propulsion | control surfaces | dynamics | feedback control | graphical information systems | GIS

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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13.017 Design of Ocean Systems I (MIT)

Description

A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation of the system, including demonstration of its operation in the marine environment. Spring Term: Introduction to the design process and its application to ocean engineering. Design project with students developing system definition and completing its preliminary design. Students are instructed in the design process, embedded systems programming and interfacing techniques, sensors, actuators, and the control of marine systems. Communications skills are honed through written and oral reports and engineering ethics are discussed. Fall Term: Students work as a group to desig

Subjects

design process | model-scale ocean system | operation in marine environment | system definition | preliminary design | embedded systems programming | interfacing techniques | sensors | actuators | marine systems | engineering ethics | system specification | group dynamics | time management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.019 Design of Ocean Systems I (13.017) (MIT)

Description

A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation of the system, including demonstration of its operation in the marine environment. Spring Term: Introduction to the design process and its application to ocean engineering. Design project with students developing system definition and completing its preliminary design. Students are instructed in the design process, embedded systems programming and interfacing techniques, sensors, actuators, and the control of marine systems. Communications skills are honed through written and oral reports and engineering ethics are discussed. Fall Term: Students work as a group to desig

Subjects

design process | model-scale ocean system | operation in marine environment | system definition | preliminary design | embedded systems programming | interfacing techniques | sensors | actuators | marine systems | engineering ethics | system specification | group dynamics | time management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

This course develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. Topics covered include analysis in time and frequency domains; design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping); describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems; extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers; discrete and digital hybrid systems and use of z-plane design. Students will complete an extended design case study. Students taking the graduate version (2.140) will attend the recitation sessions and complete additional assignments.

Subjects

feedback loops | control systems | compensation | Bode plots | Nyquist plots | state space | frequency domain | time domain | transfer functions | Laplace transform | root locus | op-amps | gears | motors | actuators | nonlinear systems | stability theory | dynamic feedback | mechanical engineering problem archive

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.75 Precision Machine Design (MIT)

Description

Intensive coverage of precision engineering theory, heuristics, and applications pertaining to the design of systems ranging from consumer products to machine tools. Topics covered include: economics, project management, and design philosophy; principles of accuracy, repeatability, and resolution; error budgeting; sensors; sensor mounting; systems design; bearings; actuators and transmissions; system integration driven by functional requirements, and operating physics. Emphasis on developing creative designs, which are optimized by analytical techniques applied via spreadsheets. This is a projects course with lectures consisting of design teams presenting their work and the class helping to develop solutions; thereby everyone learning from everyone's projects.

Subjects

precision engineering theory | heuristics | systems design | economics | project management | design philosophy | error budgeting | bearings | actuators | transmissions | system integration | functional requirements | operating physics

License

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EC.S06 Practical Electronics (MIT)

Description

You can build a wide range of practical electronic devices if you understand a few basic electronics concepts and follow some simple rules. These devices include light-activated and sound-activated toys and appliances, remote controls, timers and clocks, and motorized devices. The subject begins with an overview of the fundamental concepts, followed by a series of laboratory exercises that demonstrate the basic rules, and a final project.

Subjects

Electronics | circuit | analog circuits | testing circuits | bridge circuits | passive components | resistors | diodes | capacitors | filters | flip-flops | relays | transistors | switches | rectifiers | function generators | comparators | operational amplifiers | op-amps | timing circuits | sensors | actuators | electronics | SP.764 | SP.765

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetic fields | electrodynamics | devices and circuits | static and quasistatic fields | electromagnetic forces | actuators | sensors | TEM lines | electromagnetic waves | antennas | radiation | optical communications | acoustics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | material properties | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | sensing methods | fluid flow | microscale transport | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | actuators | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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