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STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT) STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT)

Description

The history and legacy of the Cold War on science is examined in a seminar setting for this course, looking predominantly at examples in the United States. Topics range from exploring scientists' new political roles after World War II as elite policy-makers in the nuclear age to their victimization by domestic anti-Communism. The course next examines the changing institutions in which the physical, biological, and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating the links between institutions and epistemology. The course closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold-War era. The history and legacy of the Cold War on science is examined in a seminar setting for this course, looking predominantly at examples in the United States. Topics range from exploring scientists' new political roles after World War II as elite policy-makers in the nuclear age to their victimization by domestic anti-Communism. The course next examines the changing institutions in which the physical, biological, and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating the links between institutions and epistemology. The course closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold-War era.

Subjects

cold war | cold war | history of science | history of science | nuclear age | nuclear age | post-cold-war era | post-cold-war era | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | atom bomb | atom bomb | hydrogen bomb | hydrogen bomb | atomic energy | atomic energy | McCarthyism | McCarthyism | espionage | espionage | anti-communism | anti-communism | soviet union | soviet union | cold war america | cold war america | american science | american science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT) 21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | energy | USA | USA | oil embargo | oil embargo | Gulf War | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | George Bush | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | fossil fuel | fossil fuel | automobiles | automobiles | suburbia | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | oil drilling | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | solar power | OPEC | OPEC | EPA | EPA | Earth Day | Earth Day | environmentalism | environmentalism | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Levittown | Manhattan Project | Manhattan Project

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-energy.xml

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

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STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT) STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines the history and legacy of the Cold War on American science. It explores scientist's new political roles after World War II, ranging from elite policy makers in the nuclear age to victims of domestic anti Communism. It also examines the changing institutions in which the physical sciences and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating possible epistemic effects on forms of knowledge. The subject closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold War era. This seminar examines the history and legacy of the Cold War on American science. It explores scientist's new political roles after World War II, ranging from elite policy makers in the nuclear age to victims of domestic anti Communism. It also examines the changing institutions in which the physical sciences and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating possible epistemic effects on forms of knowledge. The subject closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold War era.

Subjects

cold war | cold war | history of science | history of science | nuclear age | nuclear age | post-cold-war era | post-cold-war era | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | atom bomb | atom bomb | hydrogen bomb | hydrogen bomb | atomic energy | atomic energy | McCarthyism | McCarthyism | espionage | espionage | anti-communism | anti-communism | spying | spying | soviet union | soviet union | american science | american science | HUAC | HUAC | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | arms race | arms race | disarmament | disarmament | Sputnik | Sputnik | iron curtain | iron curtain | space race | space race | globalization | globalization | capitalism | capitalism | academic freedom | academic freedom | CIA | CIA | National Security Agency | National Security Agency | NSA | NSA | military-industrial complex | military-industrial complex | quantum physics | quantum physics | physics | physics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

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STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT)

Description

The history and legacy of the Cold War on science is examined in a seminar setting for this course, looking predominantly at examples in the United States. Topics range from exploring scientists' new political roles after World War II as elite policy-makers in the nuclear age to their victimization by domestic anti-Communism. The course next examines the changing institutions in which the physical, biological, and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating the links between institutions and epistemology. The course closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold-War era.

Subjects

cold war | history of science | nuclear age | post-cold-war era | atomic bomb | nuclear weapons | atom bomb | hydrogen bomb | atomic energy | McCarthyism | espionage | anti-communism | soviet union | cold war america | american science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | USA | oil embargo | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | nuclear power | wind power | fossil fuel | automobiles | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | global warming | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | OPEC | EPA | Earth Day | environmentalism | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Manhattan Project

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines the history and legacy of the Cold War on American science. It explores scientist's new political roles after World War II, ranging from elite policy makers in the nuclear age to victims of domestic anti Communism. It also examines the changing institutions in which the physical sciences and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating possible epistemic effects on forms of knowledge. The subject closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold War era.

Subjects

cold war | history of science | nuclear age | post-cold-war era | atomic bomb | nuclear weapons | atom bomb | hydrogen bomb | atomic energy | McCarthyism | espionage | anti-communism | spying | soviet union | american science | HUAC | oppenheimer | arms race | disarmament | Sputnik | iron curtain | space race | globalization | capitalism | academic freedom | CIA | National Security Agency | NSA | military-industrial complex | quantum physics | physics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | nuclear | world war two | twentieth century | foreign policy | cold war | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | baby boom | social movements | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | America's role | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Right | suburbanization | popular culture | World War II | WWII | 20th century | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | economic abundance | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | American politics | economy | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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