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7.342 Developmental and Molecular Biology of Regeneration (MIT) 7.342 Developmental and Molecular Biology of Regeneration (MIT)

Description

How does a regenerating animal "know" what's missing? How are stem cells or differentiated cells used to create new tissues during regeneration? In this class we will take a comparative approach to explore this fascinating problem by critically examining classic and modern scientific literature about the developmental and molecular biology of regeneration. We will learn about conserved developmental pathways that are necessary for regeneration, and we will discuss the relevance of these findings for regenerative medicine. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highl How does a regenerating animal "know" what's missing? How are stem cells or differentiated cells used to create new tissues during regeneration? In this class we will take a comparative approach to explore this fascinating problem by critically examining classic and modern scientific literature about the developmental and molecular biology of regeneration. We will learn about conserved developmental pathways that are necessary for regeneration, and we will discuss the relevance of these findings for regenerative medicine. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highl

Subjects

Regeneration | Regeneration | blastema | blastema | embryo | embryo | progenitor | progenitor | stem cells | stem cells | differentiation | differentiation | dedifferentiation | dedifferentiation | hydra | hydra | morphallaxis | morphallaxis | limb | limb | organ | organ | zebrafish | zebrafish | homeostasis | homeostasis | self-renewal | self-renewal | regenerative medicine | regenerative medicine | differentitate | differentitate | regulate | regulate | salamander | salamander | catenin | catenin | newt | newt | liver | liver | pluriptent | pluriptent | fibroblast | fibroblast

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 Developmental and Molecular Biology of Regeneration (MIT)

Description

How does a regenerating animal "know" what's missing? How are stem cells or differentiated cells used to create new tissues during regeneration? In this class we will take a comparative approach to explore this fascinating problem by critically examining classic and modern scientific literature about the developmental and molecular biology of regeneration. We will learn about conserved developmental pathways that are necessary for regeneration, and we will discuss the relevance of these findings for regenerative medicine. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highl

Subjects

Regeneration | blastema | embryo | progenitor | stem cells | differentiation | dedifferentiation | hydra | morphallaxis | limb | organ | zebrafish | homeostasis | self-renewal | regenerative medicine | differentitate | regulate | salamander | catenin | newt | liver | pluriptent | fibroblast

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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See all metadata