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17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT) 17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics. This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics.

Subjects

security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security | security | sustainability | sustainability | international relations | international relations | comparative approaches | comparative approaches | constraints | constraints | options | options | strategies | strategies | policy choice | policy choice | developing and industrial nations | developing and industrial nations | decision | decision | trade-offs | trade-offs | inter-temporal effects | inter-temporal effects | technology | technology | design systems | design systems

License

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14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | theory | theory | fluctuations | fluctuations | the basic model | the basic model | consumption/saving choice | consumption/saving choice | the RBC model | the RBC model | the labor/leisure choice | the labor/leisure choice | non-trivial investment decisions | non-trivial investment decisions | two-good analysis | two-good analysis | money | money | price setting | price setting | the ?new Keynesian? model | the ?new Keynesian? model | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT) 14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT)

Description

The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory. The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory.

Subjects

information | information | economics | economics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | money | money | risk sharing | risk sharing | moral hazard | moral hazard | adverse selection | adverse selection | signaling | signaling | screening | screening | mechanism design | mechanism design | decision making | decision making | uncertainty | uncertainty | Decision-making | Decision-making | information economics | information economics | incentive theory | incentive theory | contract theory | contract theory | choice | choice | choices | choices | microeconomic analysis | microeconomic analysis | risk | risk

License

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT) 15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | applied economics | resource scarcity | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | allocate limited resources | business choices | business choices | modeling consumer choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | market efficiency | microeconomics | microeconomics | efficiency | efficiency | supply | supply | demand | demand | consumer theory | consumer theory | producer theory | producer theory | monopoly | monopoly | imperfect competition | imperfect competition | pricing | pricing | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | group decision making | group decision making | organizational architecture | organizational architecture | international trade | international trade | equity | equity | income distribution | income distribution | economic rewards | economic rewards | managerial economics | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | corporate finance theory | network economy | network economy

License

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24.222 Decisions, Games, and Rational Choice (MIT) 24.222 Decisions, Games, and Rational Choice (MIT)

Description

Foundations and philosophical applications of Bayesian decision theory, game theory and theory of collective choice. Why should degrees of belief be probabilities? Is it always rational to maximize expected utility? If so, why and what is its utility? What is a solution to a game? What does a game-theoretic solution concept such as Nash equilibrium say about how rational players will, or should, act in a game? How are the values and the actions of groups, institutions and societies related to the values and actions of the individuals that constitute them? Foundations and philosophical applications of Bayesian decision theory, game theory and theory of collective choice. Why should degrees of belief be probabilities? Is it always rational to maximize expected utility? If so, why and what is its utility? What is a solution to a game? What does a game-theoretic solution concept such as Nash equilibrium say about how rational players will, or should, act in a game? How are the values and the actions of groups, institutions and societies related to the values and actions of the individuals that constitute them?

Subjects

decisions | decisions | games | games | rational choice | rational choice | causal decision theory | causal decision theory | social choice theory | social choice theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | voting | voting | game theory | game theory | dictatorial games | dictatorial games | non-dictatorial games | non-dictatorial games

License

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14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | theory | theory | fluctuations | fluctuations | the basic model | the basic model | consumption/saving choice | consumption/saving choice | the RBC model | the RBC model | the labor/leisure choice | the labor/leisure choice | non-trivial investment decisions | non-trivial investment decisions | two-good analysis | two-good analysis | money | money | price setting | price setting | the ?new Keynesian? model | the ?new Keynesian? model | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy

License

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14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT) 14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT)

Description

The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory. The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory.

Subjects

information | information | economics | economics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | money | money | risk sharing | risk sharing | moral hazard | moral hazard | adverse selection | adverse selection | signaling | signaling | screening | screening | mechanism design | mechanism design | decision making | decision making | uncertainty | uncertainty | Decision-making | Decision-making | information economics | information economics | incentive theory | incentive theory | contract theory | contract theory | choice | choice | choices | choices | microeconomic analysis | microeconomic analysis | risk | risk

License

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economics | economics | political economy | political economy | democratic | democratic | countries | countries | collective | collective | choice | choice | electoral competiton | electoral competiton | public goods | public goods | size | size | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | voting models | voting models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | information | information | learning | learning | agency models | agency models | political parties | political parties | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | resource allocation | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | legislatures | legislatures | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | stability | stability | informational | informational | distributive | distributive | theories | theories | executive | executive | relations | relations | representative democracy | representative democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. The course is organized around nine topics/sections: Fluctuations and Facts; The basic model: the consumption/saving choice; Allowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model); Allowing for non trivial investment decisions; Allowing for two goods; Introducing money; Introducing price setting; Introducing staggering of price decisions; and Applications to fiscal and monetary policy. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. The course is organized around nine topics/sections: Fluctuations and Facts; The basic model: the consumption/saving choice; Allowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model); Allowing for non trivial investment decisions; Allowing for two goods; Introducing money; Introducing price setting; Introducing staggering of price decisions; and Applications to fiscal and monetary policy.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | fluctuations | fluctuations | consumption | consumption | saving | saving | choice | choice | labor | labor | leisure | leisure | RBC model | RBC model | non trivial investment decisions | non trivial investment decisions | money | money | price setting | price setting | staggering price decisions | staggering price decisions | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | monetary policy. | monetary policy. | monetary policy | monetary policy

License

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT) 17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed. This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | social action | rational choice | rational choice | riots | riots | rebellions | rebellions | revolutions | revolutions | rationality | rationality | j-curve | j-curve | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | peasant movement | Vietnam | Vietnam | politics | politics | insurgency | insurgency | civil war | civil war | ethnicity | ethnicity | race riot | race riot | urban riot | urban riot | Rodney King | Rodney King | relative deprivation | relative deprivation | Spilerman | Spilerman | racial disturbances | racial disturbances | protest | protest | nationalist violence | nationalist violence | USSR | USSR | Balkans | Balkans | ethnic polarization | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Mali | Mali

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

political economy | political economy | rational choice | rational choice | legislature | legislature | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | court | court | and elections | and elections | electoral competition | electoral competition | comparative | comparative | international | international | public goods | public goods | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | multiparty competition | multiparty competition | electoral system | electoral system | voter | voter | agency models | agency models | models of political parties | models of political parties | point-valued solution | point-valued solution | set-valued solution | set-valued solution | probabilistic voting models | probabilistic voting models | structure-induced equilibrium models | structure-induced equilibrium models | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | minorities | minorities | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | government stability | government stability | informational theory | informational theory | distributive theory | distributive theory | legislative-executive relations | legislative-executive relations | representative democracy | representative democracy | direct democracy | direct democracy

License

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17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social movements | social movements | comparative | comparative | collective action | collective action | twentieth century | twentieth century | United States | United States | civil rights | civil rights | unemployed workers | unemployed workers | welfare rights | welfare rights | pro-choice | pro-choice | pro-life | pro-life | gay rights | gay rights | success | success | failures. | failures.

License

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

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ESD.932 Engineering Ethics (MIT) ESD.932 Engineering Ethics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV faculty introductions. This course introduces the theory and the practice of engineering ethics using a multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural approach. Theory includes ethics and philosophy of engineering. Historical cases are taken primarily from the scholarly literatures on engineering ethics, and hypothetical cases are written by students. Each student will write a story by selecting an ancestor or mythic hero as a substitute for a character in a historical case. Students will compare these cases and recommend action. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV faculty introductions. This course introduces the theory and the practice of engineering ethics using a multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural approach. Theory includes ethics and philosophy of engineering. Historical cases are taken primarily from the scholarly literatures on engineering ethics, and hypothetical cases are written by students. Each student will write a story by selecting an ancestor or mythic hero as a substitute for a character in a historical case. Students will compare these cases and recommend action.

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | myth | myth | Kant | Kant | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Kierkegaard | Kierkegaard | Augustine | Augustine | Joseph Campbell | Joseph Campbell | risk | risk | disaster | disaster | honesty | honesty | whisteblower | whisteblower | social responsibility | social responsibility | Pugwash | Pugwash | environment | environment | bioethics | bioethics | lawsuit | lawsuit | praxistics | praxistics | decision making | decision making | management | management | accident | accident | choice | choice | morals | morals | complexity | complexity | judgement | judgement | consequence | consequence

License

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11.126J Economics of Education (MIT) 11.126J Economics of Education (MIT)

Description

This class discusses the economic aspects of current issues in education, using both economic theory and econometric and institutional readings. Topics include discussion of basic human capital theory, the growing impact of education on earnings and earnings inequality, statistical issues in determining the true rate of return to education, the labor market for teachers, implications of the impact of computers on the demand for worker skills, the effectiveness of mid-career training for adult workers, the roles of school choice, charter schools, state standards and educational technology in improving K-12 education, and the issue of college financial aid. This class discusses the economic aspects of current issues in education, using both economic theory and econometric and institutional readings. Topics include discussion of basic human capital theory, the growing impact of education on earnings and earnings inequality, statistical issues in determining the true rate of return to education, the labor market for teachers, implications of the impact of computers on the demand for worker skills, the effectiveness of mid-career training for adult workers, the roles of school choice, charter schools, state standards and educational technology in improving K-12 education, and the issue of college financial aid.

Subjects

economics of education | economics of education | economic aspect | economic aspect | econometric | econometric | basic human capital theory | basic human capital theory | earnings and earnings inequality | earnings and earnings inequality | statistical issues | statistical issues | rate of return to education | rate of return to education | labor market for teachers | labor market for teachers | impact of computers | impact of computers | demand for worker skills | demand for worker skills | mid-career training | mid-career training | school choice | school choice | educational technology | educational technology | financial aid | financial aid

License

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11.011 The Art and Science of Negotiation (MIT) 11.011 The Art and Science of Negotiation (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to bargaining and negotiation in public, business, and legal settings. It combines a "hands-on" skill-building orientation with a look at pertinent social theory. Strategy, communications, ethics, and institutional influences are examined as they influence the ability of actors to analyze problems, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes in social, organizational, and political circumstances characterized by interdependent interests. This course provides an introduction to bargaining and negotiation in public, business, and legal settings. It combines a "hands-on" skill-building orientation with a look at pertinent social theory. Strategy, communications, ethics, and institutional influences are examined as they influence the ability of actors to analyze problems, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes in social, organizational, and political circumstances characterized by interdependent interests.

Subjects

negotiation | negotiation | bargaining | bargaining | conflict | conflict | strategy | strategy | choice | choice | strategic interaction | strategic interaction | mutual gains | mutual gains | cooperation | cooperation | problem solving | problem solving | interests | interests | stakeholders | stakeholders | listening; trust | listening; trust | communication | communication | perspective taking | perspective taking | escalation | escalation | psychological processes | psychological processes | coalitions | coalitions | listening | listening | trust | trust

License

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14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT) 14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? What is "sustainable development"? How do environmental problems differ in developing countries? Are we running out of oil and other natural resources? Should we be more energy efficient? To gain real world experience, the course is scheduled to include a visit to the MIT cogeneration plant. We will also do This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? What is "sustainable development"? How do environmental problems differ in developing countries? Are we running out of oil and other natural resources? Should we be more energy efficient? To gain real world experience, the course is scheduled to include a visit to the MIT cogeneration plant. We will also do

Subjects

economics | economics | policy | policy | environment | environment | environmental economics | environmental economics | public policy | public policy | cost-benefit analysis | cost-benefit analysis | resource management | resource management | environmental regulation | environmental regulation | health | health | sustainability | sustainability | public goods | public goods | pollution | pollution | Pigouvian taxes | Pigouvian taxes | liability | liability | kuznets curves | kuznets curves | competition | competition | growth | growth | double dividend | double dividend | hedonic | hedonic | valuation | valuation | global warming | global warming | Porter hypothesis | Porter hypothesis | social choice | social choice | carbon offsets | carbon offsets | clean development | clean development | renewables | renewables

License

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14.15J Networks (MIT) 14.15J Networks (MIT)

Description

Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a

Subjects

networks | networks | crowds | crowds | markets | markets | highly connected world | highly connected world | social networks | social networks | economic networks | economic networks | power networks | power networks | communication networks | communication networks | game theory | game theory | graph theory | graph theory | branching processes | branching processes | random graph models | random graph models | rich get richer phenomena | rich get richer phenomena | power laws | power laws | small worlds | small worlds | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | degree distributions | degree distributions | phase transitions | phase transitions | connectedness | connectedness | and giant component | and giant component | link analysis | link analysis | web search | web search | navigation | navigation | decentralized search | decentralized search | preferential attachment | preferential attachment | epidemics | epidemics | diffusion through networks | diffusion through networks | SIR | SIR | (susceptible | (susceptible | infected | infected | removed) | removed) | SIS | SIS | susceptible) | susceptible) | strategies | strategies | payoffs | payoffs | normal forms | normal forms | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | traffic networks | traffic networks | negative externalities | negative externalities | Braess' paradox | Braess' paradox | potential games | potential games | myopic behavior | myopic behavior | fictitious play | fictitious play | repeated games | repeated games | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma | cooperation | cooperation | perfect information | perfect information | imperfect information | imperfect information | positive externalities | positive externalities | strategic complements | strategic complements | path dependence | path dependence | diffusion of innovation | diffusion of innovation | contagion pheonomena | contagion pheonomena | Bayes's rule | Bayes's rule | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | first price auctions | first price auctions | second price auctions | second price auctions | social learning | social learning | Bayesian learning | Bayesian learning | copying | copying | herding | herding | herd behavior | herd behavior | informational cascades | informational cascades | decisions | decisions | social choice | social choice | Condorcet jury theorem | Condorcet jury theorem | political economy | political economy

License

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

License

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14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT) 14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice. This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | mechanism design | mechanism design | auction theory | auction theory | one-sided matching | one-sided matching | house allocation | house allocation | market problems | market problems | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | stability | stability | many-to-one | many-to-one | one-to-one | one-to-one | small cores | small cores | large markets | large markets | stochastic matching mechanisms | stochastic matching mechanisms | student assignment | student assignment | school choice | school choice | resale markets | resale markets | dynamics | dynamics | simplicity | simplicity | robustness | robustness | limited rationality | limited rationality | message spaces | message spaces | sharing risk | sharing risk | decentralized exchanges | decentralized exchanges | over-the-counter exchanges | over-the-counter exchanges

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT) 14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT)

Description

Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings. Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings.

Subjects

productivity | productivity | health | health | education | education | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | public finance | public finance | decision making | decision making | families | families | firms | firms | contracts | contracts | technology | technology | labor | labor | migration | migration | land | land | credit | credit | savings | savings | poverty | poverty | inequality | inequality | nutrition | nutrition | school choice | school choice | school vouchers | school vouchers | subsidies | subsidies | taxes | taxes | employment | employment

License

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14.385 Nonlinear Econometric Analysis (MIT) 14.385 Nonlinear Econometric Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course presents micro-econometric models, including large sample theory for estimation and hypothesis testing, generalized method of moments (GMM), estimation of censored and truncated specifications, quantile regression, structural estimation, nonparametric and semiparametric estimation, treatment effects, panel data, bootstrapping, simulation methods, and Bayesian methods. The methods are illustrated with economic applications. This course presents micro-econometric models, including large sample theory for estimation and hypothesis testing, generalized method of moments (GMM), estimation of censored and truncated specifications, quantile regression, structural estimation, nonparametric and semiparametric estimation, treatment effects, panel data, bootstrapping, simulation methods, and Bayesian methods. The methods are illustrated with economic applications.

Subjects

nonlinear | nonlinear | econometric | econometric | analysis | analysis | generalized method of moments | generalized method of moments | GMM | GMM | maximum likelihood estimation | maximum likelihood estimation | MLE | MLE | minimum distance | minimum distance | extremum | extremum | large sample theory | large sample theory | asymptotic theory | asymptotic theory | discrete choice | discrete choice | censoring | censoring | sample selection | sample selection | bootstrap | bootstrap | subsampling | subsampling | finite-sample methods | finite-sample methods | quantile regression | quantile regression | QR | QR | distributional methods | distributional methods | Bayesian methods | Bayesian methods | quasi-Bayesian methods | quasi-Bayesian methods | bounds | bounds | partial identification | partial identification | weak instruments | weak instruments | many instruments | many instruments | instrumental variables | instrumental variables | nonparametric estimation | nonparametric estimation | semiparametric estimation | semiparametric estimation | treatment effects | treatment effects | nonlinear models | nonlinear models | panel data | panel data | economic modeling | economic modeling

License

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14.453 Macroeconomic Theory III (MIT) 14.453 Macroeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This course covers issues in the theory of consumption, investment and asset prices. We lay out the basic models first, and then examine the empirical facts that motivate extensions to these models. This course covers issues in the theory of consumption, investment and asset prices. We lay out the basic models first, and then examine the empirical facts that motivate extensions to these models.

Subjects

Macroeconomic theory | Macroeconomic theory | consumption and savings decisions under certainty and uncertainty | consumption and savings decisions under certainty and uncertainty | aggregate savings | aggregate savings | wealth | wealth | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | portfolio choice | portfolio choice | asset pricing | asset pricing | investment and finance decisions | investment and finance decisions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory and is the first course in the microeconomic theory series. It is intended for graduate students in the economics program. Some components of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know while others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics of recent interest will also be covered and may include: theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty); markets and competition; tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. This course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory and is the first course in the microeconomic theory series. It is intended for graduate students in the economics program. Some components of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know while others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics of recent interest will also be covered and may include: theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty); markets and competition; tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty) | theories of production and individual choice (under certainty and uncertainty) | markets and competition | markets and competition | tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory | tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

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