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24.901 Language and its Structure I: Phonology (MIT) 24.901 Language and its Structure I: Phonology (MIT)

Description

24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the couse aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments. 24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the couse aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments.

Subjects

fundamental concepts | fundamental concepts | phonological theory | phonological theory | philosophy | philosophy | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | articulatory phonetics | articulatory phonetics | acoustic phonetics | acoustic phonetics | feature systems | feature systems | underlying representations | underlying representations | underspecification | underspecification | phonological rules | phonological rules | phonological derivations | phonological derivations | syllable structure | syllable structure | accentual systems | accentual systems | morphology-phonology interface | morphology-phonology interface

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT) 6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT)

Description

This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation. This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation.

Subjects

ToBI system | ToBI system | Tones and Break Indices | Tones and Break Indices | prosodic structure | prosodic structure | spoken utterances | spoken utterances | American English | American English | ToBI tutorial | ToBI tutorial | labelling | labelling | sample utterances | sample utterances | linguistics | linguistics | phonology | phonology | phonetics | phonetics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | speech acoustics or music | speech acoustics or music | prosody of speech | prosody of speech | intonation | intonation | rhythm | rhythm | grouping | grouping | prosodic differences | prosodic differences | phonetic implementation | phonetic implementation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT) 24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | language | language | structure | structure | theory | theory | language structure | language structure | philosophy | philosophy | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | languages | languages | syntactic theory | syntactic theory | language acquisition | language acquisition | processing | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT) STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | computers | history | history | digital | digital | scientific instrument | scientific instrument | applied science | applied science | meteorology | meteorology | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | logic | logic | mathematics | mathematics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | biochemistry | aerospace | aerospace | medicine | medicine | supercomputing | supercomputing | distributed computing | distributed computing | linguistics | linguistics | humanities | humanities | hypertext | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.868J The Society of Mind (MIT) 6.868J The Society of Mind (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is an introduction to the theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. It treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. It incorporates ideas from psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as wholes vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is an introduction to the theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. It treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. It incorporates ideas from psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as wholes vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning.

Subjects

marvin minsky | marvin minsky | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | society of the mind | society of the mind | emotion machine | emotion machine | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | cognitive theory | cognitive theory | philosophy of the mind | philosophy of the mind

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Cognitive Psychology

Description

This course introduces Cognitive Psychology. Memory, along with attention, perception, language, and decision making, are among the most prominent topics within this broad and diverse field. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Psychology 206)

Subjects

cognitive psychology | noam chomsky | cognition | motivation | emotion | neuropsychology | attention | memory | language | knowledge | comprehension | pattern recognition | object perception | problem solving | reasoning | decision making | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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24.901 Language and its Structure I: Phonology (MIT)

Description

24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the couse aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments.

Subjects

fundamental concepts | phonological theory | philosophy | cognitive psychology | articulatory phonetics | acoustic phonetics | feature systems | underlying representations | underspecification | phonological rules | phonological derivations | syllable structure | accentual systems | morphology-phonology interface

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT)

Description

This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation. Please submit any feedback about the course content using the user survey.

Subjects

ToBI system | Tones and Break Indices | prosodic structure | spoken utterances | American English | ToBI tutorial | labelling | sample utterances | linguistics | phonology | phonetics | cognitive psychology | psycholinguistics | speech acoustics or music | prosody of speech | intonation | rhythm | grouping | prosodic differences | phonetic implementation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.868J The Society of Mind (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. It treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. It incorporates ideas from psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as wholes vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning.

Subjects

marvin minsky | artificial intelligence | society of the mind | emotion machine | cognitive psychology | cognitive theory | philosophy of the mind

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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