Searching for colonization : 37 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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21L.007 World Literatures: Contact Zone (MIT) 21L.007 World Literatures: Contact Zone (MIT)

Description

Subjects

contact zone | contact zone | exploration | exploration | colonization | colonization | race | race | gender | gender | language | language | power | power | poetry | poetry | prose | prose | Africa | Africa | Caribbean | Caribbean | South Asia | South Asia | literary conventions | literary conventions

License

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

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21A.441 The Conquest of America (MIT) 21A.441 The Conquest of America (MIT)

Description

In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans. In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans.

Subjects

history | history | cultural anthropology | cultural anthropology | conquest | conquest | colonization | colonization | Americas | Americas | native people | native people | Guatemala | Guatemala | Canada | Canada | Brazil | Brazil | Panama | Panama | colonial New England | colonial New England | Jesuit | Jesuit | mission | mission | Huron | Huron | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | politics | politics | Kuna | Kuna | twentieth century | twentieth century | conflict | conflict | europe | europe | indian | indian | native americans | native americans | missions | missions

License

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21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln. This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subjects

American colonies | American colonies | Civil War | Civil War | Spanish colonization | Spanish colonization | British empire | British empire | American Revolution | American Revolution | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | U.S. Constitution | U.S. Constitution | ratification | ratification | secession | secession | Bill of Rights | Bill of Rights | John Winthrop | John Winthrop | Thomas Paine | Thomas Paine | Thomas Jefferson | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | James Madison | William H. Garrison | William H. Garrison | George Fitzhugh | George Fitzhugh | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Abraham Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | Andrew Jackson | Andrew Jackson | George Mason | George Mason | abolition | abolition | Federalism | Federalism | slavery | slavery | Constitutional Convention | Constitutional Convention

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT) 21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT)

Description

This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Subjects

21H.968 | 21H.968 | STS.415 | STS.415 | imperialism | imperialism | colonization | colonization | global exploration | global exploration | environment | environment | nature | nature | natural history | natural history | domestic animals | domestic animals | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | James Cook | James Cook

License

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21H.601 Islam, the Middle East, and the West (MIT) 21H.601 Islam, the Middle East, and the West (MIT)

Description

This course aims to provide students with a general overview of basic themes and issues in Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the present, with an emphasis on the encounters and exchanges between the "Middle East" (Southwest Asia and North Africa) and the "West" (Europe and the United States). This course aims to provide students with a general overview of basic themes and issues in Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the present, with an emphasis on the encounters and exchanges between the "Middle East" (Southwest Asia and North Africa) and the "West" (Europe and the United States).

Subjects

southwest asia | southwest asia | north africa | north africa | europe | europe | united states | united states | abbasid | abbasid | empire | empire | mongol | mongol | christianity | christianity | ottoman | ottoman | colonization | colonization | napoleon | napoleon | egypt | egypt | hegemony | hegemony | islam | islam | middle | middle | east | east | west | west

License

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21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT) 21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT)

Description

From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s. From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s.

Subjects

History | History | europe | europe | european | european | imperialism | imperialism | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | political | political | economic | economic | cultural | cultural | Africa | Africa | India | India | Asia | Asia | imperial expansion | imperial expansion | the rise of "scientific" racism | the rise of "scientific" racism | national identities | national identities | social class | social class | gender | gender | colonial ideologies | colonial ideologies | colonial rule | colonial rule | decolonization | decolonization | globalization | globalization | post-colonial world. | post-colonial world.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT) 21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT)

Description

The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti

Subjects

Literature | Literature | celtic | celtic | colonization | colonization | King Arthur | King Arthur | Knights of the Round Table | Knights of the Round Table | British Imperialism | British Imperialism | Catholic Church | Catholic Church | twelfth century | twelfth century | thirteenth century | thirteenth century | morphology | morphology | Arthurian romance | Arthurian romance | historical documents | historical documents | English conquests | English conquests | Brittany | Brittany | Wales | Wales | Scotland | Scotland | Ireland | Ireland | Bede | Bede | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Chr?tien de Troyes | Chr?tien de Troyes | Marie de France | Marie de France | Gerald of Wales | Gerald of Wales | Perilous Graveyard | Perilous Graveyard | Knight of the Sword | Knight of the Sword | Perlesvaus | Perlesvaus | High History of the Holy Graal | High History of the Holy Graal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | engineering | engineering | hobbyist | hobbyist | communications | communications | Internet | Internet | machine age | machine age | Apollo program | Apollo program | biotechnology | biotechnology | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT) 21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT)

Description

This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Subjects

21H.968 | 21H.968 | STS.415 | STS.415 | imperialism | imperialism | colonization | colonization | global exploration | global exploration | environment | environment | nature | nature | natural history | natural history | domestic animals | domestic animals | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | James Cook | James Cook

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT) 21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions by looking at how people overthrow their rulers and establish new governments. Considers a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. Examines how revolutionaries have attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals. Asks whether radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror. Seeks to explain why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, novels, memoirs, and newspapers. This course explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions by looking at how people overthrow their rulers and establish new governments. Considers a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. Examines how revolutionaries have attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals. Asks whether radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror. Seeks to explain why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, novels, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

haiti | haiti | revolution | revolution | america | america | american revolution | american revolution | haitian revolution | haitian revolution | slavery | slavery | freedom | freedom | colonization | colonization | european migration | european migration | egypt | egypt | arab spring | arab spring | mubarak | mubarak

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.089 Technology and Innovation in Africa (MIT) STS.089 Technology and Innovation in Africa (MIT)

Description

What do technology and innovation mean from Africa? This is the central question of this course, which tackles a double absence: Of the meanings and role of technology in African history, on the one hand, and of Africa's place in the global history of technology, on the other. This course alternates between technologies from outside and technologies from within Africa and their itineraries in everyday life, and it is designed to provide students with grounded understandings of technology in Africa for intellectual and action-oriented purposes. What do technology and innovation mean from Africa? This is the central question of this course, which tackles a double absence: Of the meanings and role of technology in African history, on the one hand, and of Africa's place in the global history of technology, on the other. This course alternates between technologies from outside and technologies from within Africa and their itineraries in everyday life, and it is designed to provide students with grounded understandings of technology in Africa for intellectual and action-oriented purposes.

Subjects

technology | technology | innovation | innovation | Africa | Africa | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | colonization | colonization | food production | food production | textiles | textiles | cotton | cotton | climate engineering | climate engineering | mining | mining | metallurgy | metallurgy | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | guns | guns | horses | horses | cell phones | cell phones | music | music

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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World History in the Early Modern and Modern Eras (1600-Present)

Description

This course will present a comparative overview of world history from the 17th century to the present era. The student will examine the origins of major economic, political, social, cultural, and technological trends of the past 400 years and explore the impact of these trends on world societies. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (History 103)

Subjects

global | exchange | colonization | slave trade | absolutism | colonial conflicts | revolution | enlightenment | new imperialism | modernization | world war i | totalitarian states | depression | russia | stalin | italy | mussolini | germany | hitler | japan | world war ii | united nations | cold war | decolonization | china | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT) 21G.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity? This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | global economy | labor market | labor market | colonization | colonization | empire | empire | trade | trade | world music | world music | cuisine | cuisine | sports | sports | sex work | sex work | podcasts | podcasts | Islamic Spain | Islamic Spain | architecture | architecture | Silk Road | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | cultural appropriation | exotification | exotification | authenticity | authenticity | immigration | immigration | assimilation | assimilation | anime | anime | capitalism | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT) 21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This course explores the last 500 years of world history. Rather than trying to cover all regions for all periods of time, we will focus on four related themes: the struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization; the emergence of modern states; and the development of the tastes and disciplines of bourgeois society.  Note: This course is based on a model developed by Professor Daniel Segal of Pitzer College. This course explores the last 500 years of world history. Rather than trying to cover all regions for all periods of time, we will focus on four related themes: the struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization; the emergence of modern states; and the development of the tastes and disciplines of bourgeois society.  Note: This course is based on a model developed by Professor Daniel Segal of Pitzer College.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | capitalist economies | capitalist economies | industrialization | industrialization | modern states | modern states | bourgeois society | bourgeois society | The Opium War | The Opium War | the French Revolution | the French Revolution | haitian Revolution | haitian Revolution | advertising | advertising

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This course explores the last 500 years of world history. Rather than trying to cover all regions for all periods of time, we will focus on four related themes: the struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization; the emergence of modern states; and the development of the tastes and disciplines of bourgeois society.  Note: This course is based on a model developed by Professor Daniel Segal of Pitzer College.

Subjects

colonization | capitalist economies | industrialization | modern states | bourgeois society | The Opium War | the French Revolution | haitian Revolution | advertising

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | Civil War | World War II | Cold War | industrialization | mass production | craftsmanship | transportation | Taylorism | aeronautics | systems approach | computers | control | automation | nature | popular culture | terrorism | engineering | hobbyist | communications | Internet | machine age | Apollo program | biotechnology | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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South African Political Thought

Description

Authors:  Andrew Nash This course provides a survey of the main developments in South African political thought since the beginning of the twentieth century. Clicked 42 times. Last clicked 11/02/2014 - 17:56. Teaching & Learning Context:  This collection of materials is taken from a semester long course within the UCT Political Studies programme, concerning political thought in South Africa. Students on the course would attend around 4 hour-long lectures and 1 tutorial per week. The materials presented here are selected lecture notes and tutorial plans. Not all lectures in the series have notes; som

Subjects

Political Studies | Humanities | Downloadable Documents | Lecture Notes | English | Post-secondary | apartheid | black consciousness | decolonization | mass movements in south african politics | political history | post-colonial political discourse | south africa | south african liberation struggle | south african political thought

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/za/

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21F.076 Globalization: the Good, the Bad, and the In-Between (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Through lectures, discussions and student presentations, we will study the cultural, linguistic, social and political impact of globalization across broad international borders and on specific language communities. We will consider answers to key questions such as: What are the contending definitions of globalization? What are the principal agents of change? How have those agents of change been transformed in our contemporary world? What's new, what's hybrid, and what's traditional? What does it mean to be a world citizen? How can world citizens preserve cultural specificity?

Subjects

global economy | labor market | colonization | empire | trade | world music | cuisine | sports | sex work | podcasts | Islamic Spain | architecture | Silk Road | cultural appropriation | exotification | authenticity | immigration | assimilation | anime | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Colonial Latin and South America

Description

This course will introduce the student to the history of Latin and South America from the year in which European explorers first discovered and began to colonize the region to the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin and South America during this 400-year period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the interaction between native peoples and European settlers created diverse and complex colonial societies throughout Latin and South America, and why the colonies of the region eventually declared their independence from European political control. This free course may be completed onli

Subjects

iberia | spain | portugal | africa | religion | trade | america | conquest | mexico | peru | columbian exchange | colonization | settlement | slavery | caste | class | family | women | trans-atlantic | hapsburg | bourbon | brazil | revolution | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Grška kolonizacija - križanka Greek colonization - crossword

Description

Križanka sestavljena iz besed povezanih s Grško kolonizacijo. Crossword puzzle build of terms regarding the Greek colonization.

Subjects

zgodovina | history | arhimed | archimedes | pitagora | pythagoras | grčija kolonizacija | greek colonization | križanka | crossword

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This course explores the last 500 years of world history. Rather than trying to cover all regions for all periods of time, we will focus on four related themes: the struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalist economies and industrialization; the emergence of modern states; and the development of the tastes and disciplines of bourgeois society.  Note: This course is based on a model developed by Professor Daniel Segal of Pitzer College.

Subjects

colonization | capitalist economies | industrialization | modern states | bourgeois society | The Opium War | the French Revolution | haitian Revolution | advertising

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.007 World Literatures: Contact Zone (MIT)

Description

World Literatures will focus on the concept of the contact zone. What happens when cultures with different ideologies and norms come into contact with each other through exploration and colonization? We will examine how the complex issues surrounding race, gender, language and power are represented in both poetry and prose from African, Caribbean and South Asian perspectives. Our discussions will focus on not only the historical situations that these texts represent, but also the literary conventions these writers use to express these unique stories.Recommended CitationFor any use or distribution of these materials, please cite as follows:Alisa K. Braithwaite, course materials for 21L.007 World Literatures, Fall 2006. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu/), Massachusetts Institute of Tec

Subjects

contact zone | exploration | colonization | race | gender | language | power | poetry | prose | Africa | Caribbean | South Asia | literary conventions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | Civil War | World War II | Cold War | industrialization | mass production | craftsmanship | transportation | Taylorism | aeronautics | systems approach | computers | control | automation | nature | popular culture | terrorism | rural society | agrarian society | artisan society | industrial society | power | industrial capitalism | factory system | transport | communication | industrial corporation | social relations | production | science-based industry | technology | innovation | process | social criteria | American history | America | technologies | democratic process | political | politics | social | progress | United States | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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