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11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT) 11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei

Subjects

reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | diagrams | diagrams | reflective practice | reflective practice | Donald Schon | Donald Schon | practice | practice | learning | learning | conceptual innovation | conceptual innovation | cognitive resources | cognitive resources | socialization | socialization | externalization | externalization | combination | combination | internalization | internalization | SECI Cycle of Knowledge | SECI Cycle of Knowledge

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2.854 Manufacturing Systems I (SMA 6304) (MIT) 2.854 Manufacturing Systems I (SMA 6304) (MIT)

Description

As the first in a sequence of four half-term courses, this course will provide the fundamental building blocks for conceptualizing, understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains. These building blocks include process analysis, queuing theory, simulation, forecasting, inventory theory and linear programming. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 6304 (Manufacturing Systems I: Analytical Methods and Flow Models). As the first in a sequence of four half-term courses, this course will provide the fundamental building blocks for conceptualizing, understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains. These building blocks include process analysis, queuing theory, simulation, forecasting, inventory theory and linear programming. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 6304 (Manufacturing Systems I: Analytical Methods and Flow Models).

Subjects

conceptualizing | conceptualizing | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | process analysis | process analysis | queueing theory | queueing theory | simulation | simulation | forecasting | forecasting | inventory theory | inventory theory | linear programming | linear programming | conceptualizing | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | conceptualizing | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | SMA 6304 | SMA 6304

License

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11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei

Subjects

reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | diagrams | reflective practice | Donald Schon | practice | learning | conceptual innovation | cognitive resources | socialization | externalization | combination | internalization | SECI Cycle of Knowledge

License

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21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social, economic and cultural history. We will examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social, economic and cultural history. We will examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches.

Subjects

21H.991 | 21H.991 | STS.210 | STS.210 | History | History | theory | theory | Twentieth century | Twentieth century | social | social | economic | economic | cultural | cultural | primary sources | primary sources | narrative | narrative | methodology | methodology | social processes | social processes | ordinary people | ordinary people | collective mentalities | collective mentalities | structure | structure | material life | material life | obscure | obscure | oppressed | oppressed | poor | poor | Annales school | Annales school | conceptualization | conceptualization

License

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

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4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT) 4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT)

Description

This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure. This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | story trajectory | story trajectory | character development | character development | verisimilitude | verisimilitude | time-space continuity | time-space continuity | viewer identification | viewer identification | suspension of disbelief | suspension of disbelief | closure | closure | narrative cinema | narrative cinema | speculative biography | speculative biography | conceptual video | conceptual video | the fake | the fake | the remake | the remake | domestic ethnography | domestic ethnography

License

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1.101 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Design I (MIT) 1.101 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Design I (MIT)

Description

In this sophomore design course, you will be challenged with three design tasks: a first concerning water resources/treatment, a second concerning structural design, and a third focusing on the conceptual (re)design of a large system, Boston's Back Bay. The first two tasks require the design, fabrication and testing of hardware. Several laboratory experiments will be carried out and lectures will be presented to introduce students to the conceptual and experimental basis for design in both domains. This course was based in large part on the Fall 2005 offering of 1.101, developed by Prof. Harold Hemond. In this sophomore design course, you will be challenged with three design tasks: a first concerning water resources/treatment, a second concerning structural design, and a third focusing on the conceptual (re)design of a large system, Boston's Back Bay. The first two tasks require the design, fabrication and testing of hardware. Several laboratory experiments will be carried out and lectures will be presented to introduce students to the conceptual and experimental basis for design in both domains. This course was based in large part on the Fall 2005 offering of 1.101, developed by Prof. Harold Hemond.

Subjects

design tasks | design tasks | water resources | water resources | water treatment | water treatment | structural design | structural design | conceptual design | conceptual design | Boston | Boston | Back Bay | Back Bay | redesign | redesign | measuring pH | measuring pH | acidity | acidity | water filter testing | water filter testing | tension tests | tension tests

License

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6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT) 6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design. 6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design.

Subjects

natural language processing | natural language processing | computational methods | computational methods | computer science | computer science | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | linguistic theory | linguistic theory | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | applications | applications | thematic structure | thematic structure | lexical-conceptual structure | lexical-conceptual structure | semantic structure | semantic structure | pragmatic structure | pragmatic structure | discourse structure | discourse structure | phonology | phonology | morphology | morphology | 2-level morphology | 2-level morphology | kimmo | kimmo | hmm tagging | hmm tagging | tagging | tagging | rule-based tagging | rule-based tagging | part of speech tagging | part of speech tagging | brill tagger | brill tagger | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | automata | automata | word modeling | word modeling | grammars | grammars | parsing algorithms | parsing algorithms | shift-reduce parsers | shift-reduce parsers | Earley's algorithm | Earley's algorithm | chart parsing | chart parsing | context-free parsing | context-free parsing | feature-based parsing | feature-based parsing | natural language system design | natural language system design | integrated lexicon | integrated lexicon | syntactic features | syntactic features | semantic interpretation | semantic interpretation | compositionality | compositionality | quantifiers | quantifiers | lexical semantic | lexical semantic | semantics | semantics | machine translation | machine translation | language learning | language learning | computational models of language | computational models of language | origins of language | origins of language | 6.863 | 6.863 | 9.611 | 9.611

License

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT) 9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving. This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | cognitive processes | cognitive processes | cognition | cognition | the mind | the mind | object recognition | object recognition | attention | attention | memory | memory | associative memory | associative memory | learning | learning | implicit memory | implicit memory | conceptual short term memory | conceptual short term memory | working memory | working memory | language | language | concepts | concepts | prototypes | prototypes | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | visual knowledge | visual knowledge | mental codes | mental codes | judgement | judgement | reasoning | reasoning | problem-solving | problem-solving | conscious thought | conscious thought | unconscious thought | unconscious thought

License

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15.342J Organizations and Environments (MIT) 15.342J Organizations and Environments (MIT)

Description

The goal of this doctoral course is to familiarize students with major conceptual frameworks, debates, and developments in contemporary organization theory. This is an inter-disciplinary domain of inquiry drawing primarily from sociology, and secondarily from economics, psychology, anthropology, and political science. The course focuses on inter-organizational processes, and also addresses the economic, institutional and cultural contexts that organizations must face. This is an introduction to a vast and multifaceted domain of inquiry. Due to time limitations, this course will touch lightly on many important topics, and neglect others entirely; its design resembles more a map than an encyclopedia. Also, given the focus on theoretical matters, methodological issues will move to the backgro The goal of this doctoral course is to familiarize students with major conceptual frameworks, debates, and developments in contemporary organization theory. This is an inter-disciplinary domain of inquiry drawing primarily from sociology, and secondarily from economics, psychology, anthropology, and political science. The course focuses on inter-organizational processes, and also addresses the economic, institutional and cultural contexts that organizations must face. This is an introduction to a vast and multifaceted domain of inquiry. Due to time limitations, this course will touch lightly on many important topics, and neglect others entirely; its design resembles more a map than an encyclopedia. Also, given the focus on theoretical matters, methodological issues will move to the backgro

Subjects

empirical material | empirical material | major conceptual frameworks | major conceptual frameworks | debates | debates | developments in contemporary organization theory | developments in contemporary organization theory | inter-disciplinary domain of inquiry | inter-disciplinary domain of inquiry | sociology | sociology | economics | economics | psychology | psychology | anthropology | anthropology | political science | political science | inter-organizational processes | inter-organizational processes | cultural contexts that organizations must face | cultural contexts that organizations must face | 15.342 | 15.342 | 11.262 | 11.262

License

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed. Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | computers | future developments | future developments | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | programming languages | programming languages | firewall | firewall | e-business | e-business | computer architecture | computer architecture | operating | operating | software development | software development | database | database | user interface | user interface | telecommunication | telecommunication | data transmission | data transmission | local area network | local area network | wireless network | wireless network | internet | internet | world wide web | world wide web | digital security | digital security | architecture | architecture | data | data | transmission | transmission | wireless | wireless | interface | interface | user | user | software | software | development | development | programming | programming | languages | languages | distributed | distributed | computing | computing | LAN | LAN | local | local | area | area | future | future | digital | digital | security | security | technology | technology | information | information | management | management | systems | systems | relational | relational | graphical | graphical | interfaces | interfaces | client/server | client/server | enterprise | enterprise | applications | applications | cryptography | cryptography | services | services | Microsoft | Microsoft | Access | Access | Lotus Notes | Lotus Notes | processing | processing | memory | memory | I/O | I/O | CPU | CPU | OS | OS | hardware | hardware | compression | compression | SQL | SQL | queries | queries | design | design | WAN | WAN | wide | wide | Ethernet | Ethernet | packet-switched | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | peer-to-peer | WWW | WWW | public | public | key | key | mining | mining | warehousing | warehousing | concepts | concepts | conceptual | conceptual | modern computing | modern computing | information management | information management | operating systems | operating systems | relational database systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | client/server systems | enterprise applications | enterprise applications | web.internet services | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | Microsoft Access | database management systems | database management systems | information technology | information technology | telecommunications | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | eBusiness applications | client | client | servers | servers | wireless area network | wireless area network

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MAS.961 Special Topics: Designing Sociable Media (MIT) MAS.961 Special Topics: Designing Sociable Media (MIT)

Description

This project-based course explores new design strategies for social interaction in the computer mediated world. Through weekly readings and design assignments we will examine topics such as: Data-based portraiture Depicting growth, change and the passage of time Visualizing conversations, crowds, and networks Interfaces for the connected city Mobile social technologies The course emphasizes developing visual and interactive literacy. This project-based course explores new design strategies for social interaction in the computer mediated world. Through weekly readings and design assignments we will examine topics such as: Data-based portraiture Depicting growth, change and the passage of time Visualizing conversations, crowds, and networks Interfaces for the connected city Mobile social technologies The course emphasizes developing visual and interactive literacy.

Subjects

online | online | online behavior | online behavior | internet | internet | interface | interface | interaction | interaction | cultural mores | cultural mores | social cues | social cues | virtual world | virtual world | on-line community | on-line community | social networking | social networking | storytelling | storytelling | persona | persona | web 2.0 | web 2.0 | email | email | IM | IM | cooperation | cooperation | marketing | marketing | surveillance | surveillance | creativity | creativity | connection | connection | conversation | conversation | mobility | mobility | web design | web design | conceptual metaphor | conceptual metaphor

License

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Politics, power and political economy in Latin America Politics, power and political economy in Latin America

Description

Dr Motta's research focus is the politics of subaltern resistance, with particular reference to Latin America. Dr Motta's research focus is the politics of subaltern resistance, with particular reference to Latin America. This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module explores and analyses democratic politics in Latin America since the third wave of democratization in the 1980s. It is divided into three parts: 1. Conceptualising democracy in the region with a focus on the debate between those who argue that liberal democracy and liberal markets are necessary and desirable and those who argue that only experiments that go beyond both will truly democratise the region. 2. Explaining problems in democratic development such as lack of participation, representation and citizenship with reference to the political economy of neoliberalism, dependent development and political culture, amongst other theories. 3. Asking the qu This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module explores and analyses democratic politics in Latin America since the third wave of democratization in the 1980s. It is divided into three parts: 1. Conceptualising democracy in the region with a focus on the debate between those who argue that liberal democracy and liberal markets are necessary and desirable and those who argue that only experiments that go beyond both will truly democratise the region. 2. Explaining problems in democratic development such as lack of participation, representation and citizenship with reference to the political economy of neoliberalism, dependent development and political culture, amongst other theories. 3. Asking the qu

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code: M13098 | Module Code: M13098 | politics and international relations | politics and international relations | conceptualising democracy | conceptualising democracy | liberal democracy | liberal democracy | liberal markets | liberal markets | democratic development | democratic development | citizenship | citizenship | political economy | political economy | neoliberalism | neoliberalism

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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24.500 Topics in Philosophy of Mind: Mental Content (MIT) 24.500 Topics in Philosophy of Mind: Mental Content (MIT)

Description

Propositions are everywhere in the philosophy of mind. Believing, hoping, and intending (for example) are said to be "propositional attitudes", mental states that involve relations to propositions. The seminar will examine issues at the heart of the dispute between the proposition-aficionados and their detractors. The course will be divided into five parts, covering: (1) de se thought; (2) propositions; (3) knowing how; (4) perceptual content; (5) the knowledge argument. Propositions are everywhere in the philosophy of mind. Believing, hoping, and intending (for example) are said to be "propositional attitudes", mental states that involve relations to propositions. The seminar will examine issues at the heart of the dispute between the proposition-aficionados and their detractors. The course will be divided into five parts, covering: (1) de se thought; (2) propositions; (3) knowing how; (4) perceptual content; (5) the knowledge argument.

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | mental state | mental state | propositions | propositions | propositional attitudes | propositional attitudes | de se thought | de se thought | knowing how | knowing how | perceptual content | perceptual content | knowledge argument | knowledge argument | perception | perception | nonconceptual content | nonconceptual content | indexical | indexical | philosophy of mind | philosophy of mind | logic | logic

License

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2.854 Manufacturing Systems I (SMA 6304) (MIT)

Description

As the first in a sequence of four half-term courses, this course will provide the fundamental building blocks for conceptualizing, understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains. These building blocks include process analysis, queuing theory, simulation, forecasting, inventory theory and linear programming. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 6304 (Manufacturing Systems I: Analytical Methods and Flow Models).

Subjects

conceptualizing | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | process analysis | queueing theory | simulation | forecasting | inventory theory | linear programming | conceptualizing | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | SMA 6304

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive processes | cognition | the mind | object recognition | attention | memory | associative memory | learning | implicit memory | conceptual short term memory | working memory | language | concepts | prototypes | psycholinguistics | visual knowledge | mental codes | judgement | reasoning | problem-solving | conscious thought | unconscious thought

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.342J Organizations and Environments (MIT)

Description

The goal of this doctoral course is to familiarize students with major conceptual frameworks, debates, and developments in contemporary organization theory. This is an inter-disciplinary domain of inquiry drawing primarily from sociology, and secondarily from economics, psychology, anthropology, and political science. The course focuses on inter-organizational processes, and also addresses the economic, institutional and cultural contexts that organizations must face. This is an introduction to a vast and multifaceted domain of inquiry. Due to time limitations, this course will touch lightly on many important topics, and neglect others entirely; its design resembles more a map than an encyclopedia. Also, given the focus on theoretical matters, methodological issues will move to the backgro

Subjects

empirical material | major conceptual frameworks | debates | developments in contemporary organization theory | inter-disciplinary domain of inquiry | sociology | economics | psychology | anthropology | political science | inter-organizational processes | cultural contexts that organizations must face | 15.342 | 11.262

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ía de la Investigación Científica

Description

La asigantura se inscribe en el marco de la Licenciatura de Español como Lengua Materna y Lengua Extranjera. Se organiza en dos bloques: 1-Iniciación en la Investigación. Las Ciencias Sociales. 2-Metodología de la investigación. Caracterización. Métodos. Anteproyectos de investigación en E/LM y E/LE. Se incluye, desde 2011, material digitalizado para alumna con discapacidad visual, es decir con Necesidades Educativas Especiales (NEE).

Subjects

órico | étodos | Humanidades | Marco conceptual | ñol Lengua Extranjera | ón | ñol Lengua Materna | Proceso | NEE(Necesidades Educativas Especiales) | Objetivos | ótesis | ía

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/

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Selected Student Architectural Technology Projects

Description

Authors:  Tom Sanya The underpinning pedagogical idea is that architectural technology is part of this hierarchical framework: conceptualising (architectural concept)-structuring (structural system)-placement and layerin Clicked 288 times. Last clicked 12/07/2014 - 10:18. Teaching & Learning Context:  These are examples of student projects taken from architectural technology in the 2nd Year of the UCT Bachelor of Architectural Studies programme in 2010.

Subjects

Architecture | Engineering and the Built Environment | Downloadable Documents | Other | English | Post-secondary | architectural technology | conceptualising | detailing | fallingwater house | placement and layering | structuring | tutorials

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/za/

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The Details and Construction Processes of the Fallingwater House

Description

Authors:  Tom Sanya The information presented here is taken from teaching architectural technology in the 2nd Year of the UCT Bachelor of Architectural Studies programme in 2010. Clicked 973 times. Last clicked 12/17/2014 - 19:13. Teaching & Learning Context:  The information presented here is taken from teaching architectural technology in the 2nd Year of the UCT Bachelor of Architectural Studies programme in 2010.

Subjects

Architecture | Engineering and the Built Environment | Downloadable Documents | Video | Lecture Notes | English | Post-secondary | architectural technology | conceptualising | detailing | fallingwater house | placement and layering | structuring

License

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ía educativa utilizando estrategias constructivistas de enseñanza-aprend

Description

Este curso consiste en adquirir habilidades para diseñar, desarrollar, implementar y evaluar situaciones de enseñanza-aprendizaje que apliquen estrategias constructivistas y tecnología. En este curso se aplicará la técnica didáctica llamada Project Oriented Learning (POL –por sus siglas en inglés- : Aprendizaje basado en proyectos) ya que los alumnos realizarán un proyecto educativo para un contexto específico en donde aplicarán una o varias estrategias constructivistas y realizarán esto a través del desarrollo de objetos de aprendizaje y el diseño de una página web. Para lograr este propósito los alumnos tendrán que investigar bibliografía sobre estrategias constr

Subjects

Estrategias constructivistas para el aprendizaje | Aprendizaje basado en problemas | Aprendizaje basado en proyectos | Aprendizaje basado en casos | Aprendizaje colaborativo | Aprendizaje por descubrimiento | éntico | Aprendizaje comprometido | Aprendizaje situado | Habilidades del pensamiento | ón | Otras habilidades | Objetos de aprendizaje | ón a las conceptualizaciones de objetos de aprendizaje | ón didáctica de objetos | Consideraciones instruccionales | ógicas | Interfaz | ón de la página web | ño de página web | Desarrollo | ía

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/mx/

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ón a la Enseñanza de las Ciencias y la Tecnología

Description

Subjects

aprendizaje significativo | ía | ideas previas | mapas conceptuales | concepciones alternativas | ón formativa y sumativa | ñanza de la ciencia | ejercicios como problemas

License

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Skills For Learning - The Research Process

Description

Zip file containing animation showing a roadmap through the research process journey.

Subjects

ukoer | skills for learning | research process | research stages | research methodology | conceptualisation | contextualisation | data analysis | reporting conclusions | Education | X000 | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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