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12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT) 12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT)

Description

The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i

Subjects

Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | deep Earth | deep Earth | lower mantle | lower mantle | outer core | outer core | integrated seismological | integrated seismological | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | CMB detection and topography | CMB detection and topography | D'' anisotropy | D'' anisotropy | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | ultra-low velocity zones) | ultra-low velocity zones) | temperature | temperature | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | phase relations | phase relations | mineral fabrications | mineral fabrications | cmb detection | cmb detection | topography | topography | mineral physics | mineral physics | geodynamical perspectives | geodynamical perspectives | D" Region | D" Region | ultra-low velocity zones | ultra-low velocity zones | partial melting | partial melting | mineral texture | mineral texture | core rigidity zones | core rigidity zones | sedimentation | sedimentation | mantle flow | mantle flow | core mantle coupling | core mantle coupling | geomagnetic field | geomagnetic field

License

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

License

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12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT) 12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT)

Description

This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology). This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology).

Subjects

history of the earth-surface environment | history of the earth-surface environment | deep-sea sediments | deep-sea sediments | ice cores | ice cores | corals | corals | Micropaleontological | Micropaleontological | isotopic | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | seawater composition | seawater composition | atmospheric chemistry | atmospheric chemistry | climate | climate | ocean temperature | ocean temperature | circulation | circulation | chemistry | chemistry | glacial/interglacial cycles | glacial/interglacial cycles | orbital forcing | orbital forcing | climate change | climate change | marine records | marine records | ice core records | ice core records | continental records | continental records | paleoceanographic data | paleoceanographic data | statistics | statistics | factor analysis | factor analysis | time series analysis | time series analysis | simple climatology | simple climatology | geochemical changes | geochemical changes | mineralogical changes | mineralogical changes | glacial cycles | glacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | earth-surface environment | earth-surface environment | environmental history | environmental history | Oxygen Isotope | Oxygen Isotope | Coral Reefs | Coral Reefs | Paleoceanography | Paleoceanography | Paleoclimatology | Paleoclimatology | Paleothermometry | Paleothermometry | Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide | Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide | Ocean Chemistry | Ocean Chemistry | Salinity | Salinity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT) 12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT)

Description

This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology). This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology).

Subjects

history of the earth-surface environment | history of the earth-surface environment | deep-sea sediments | deep-sea sediments | ice cores | ice cores | corals | corals | Micropaleontological | Micropaleontological | isotopic | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | seawater composition | seawater composition | atmospheric chemistry | atmospheric chemistry | climate | climate | ocean temperature | ocean temperature | circulation | circulation | chemistry | chemistry | glacial/interglacial cycles | glacial/interglacial cycles | orbital forcing | orbital forcing | climate change | climate change | marine records | marine records | ice core records | ice core records | continental records | continental records | paleoceanographic data | paleoceanographic data | statistics | statistics | factor analysis | factor analysis | time series analysis | time series analysis | simple climatology | simple climatology | geochemical changes | geochemical changes | mineralogical changes | mineralogical changes | glacial cycles | glacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | earth-surface environment | earth-surface environment | environmental history | environmental history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT) 12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT)

Description

This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology). This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology).

Subjects

history of the earth-surface environment | history of the earth-surface environment | deep-sea sediments | deep-sea sediments | ice cores | ice cores | corals | corals | Micropaleontological | Micropaleontological | isotopic | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | seawater composition | seawater composition | atmospheric chemistry | atmospheric chemistry | climate | climate | ocean temperature | ocean temperature | circulation | circulation | chemistry | chemistry | glacial/interglacial cycles | glacial/interglacial cycles | orbital forcing | orbital forcing | climate change | climate change | marine records | marine records | ice core records | ice core records | continental records | continental records | paleoceanographic data | paleoceanographic data | statistics | statistics | factor analysis | factor analysis | time series analysis | time series analysis | simple climatology | simple climatology | geochemical changes | geochemical changes | mineralogical changes | mineralogical changes | glacial cycles | glacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | earth-surface environment | earth-surface environment | environmental history | environmental history | Oxygen Isotope | Oxygen Isotope | Coral Reefs | Coral Reefs | Paleoceanography | Paleoceanography | Paleoclimatology | Paleoclimatology | Paleothermometry | Paleothermometry | Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide | Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide | Ocean Chemistry | Ocean Chemistry | Salinity | Salinity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT) 22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers. This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | core design criteria | core design criteria | in-core aspects | in-core aspects | nuclear fuel cycle | nuclear fuel cycle | operations | operations | economics | economics | fast reactors | fast reactors | CANDU physics | CANDU physics | fuel cycle | fuel cycle | coupled reactor analysis | coupled reactor analysis | fuel manufacturing and design | fuel manufacturing and design | thorium fuel cycles | thorium fuel cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.355 Musical Improvisation (MIT) 21M.355 Musical Improvisation (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element video. In this course, students study concepts and practice techniques of improvisation in solo and ensemble contexts. The course examines relationships between improvisation, composition, and performance based in traditional and experimental approaches. Hands-on music making will be complemented by discussion of the aesthetics of improvisation. Weekly lab sessions support work on musical technique. Guest artist / lecturers will engage students through mini-residencies in jazz with film, Indian music, electronic music, and blending improvisation with classic music; and an accompanying concert series will feature these artists in performance. Open by audition to instrumental or vocal performers. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element video. In this course, students study concepts and practice techniques of improvisation in solo and ensemble contexts. The course examines relationships between improvisation, composition, and performance based in traditional and experimental approaches. Hands-on music making will be complemented by discussion of the aesthetics of improvisation. Weekly lab sessions support work on musical technique. Guest artist / lecturers will engage students through mini-residencies in jazz with film, Indian music, electronic music, and blending improvisation with classic music; and an accompanying concert series will feature these artists in performance. Open by audition to instrumental or vocal performers.

Subjects

improvised music | improvised music | collaboration | collaboration | jazz | jazz | film score | film score | Indian music | Indian music | electro-acoustic music | electro-acoustic music | graphic score | graphic score

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.065 Introduction to Musical Composition (MIT) 21M.065 Introduction to Musical Composition (MIT)

Description

Through a progressive series of composition projects, students investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Aesthetic issues are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result, whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods. Through a progressive series of composition projects, students investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Aesthetic issues are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result, whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods.

Subjects

form | form | structure | structure | notation | notation | musical score | musical score | composer | composer | composing | composing | music history | music history | deep listening | deep listening | sound | sound | soundwalk | soundwalk | instrument building | instrument building | contemporary music | contemporary music | avant-garde music | avant-garde music | experimental music | experimental music | graphic score | graphic score | Musique Concrete | Musique Concrete | vocal music | vocal music

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 2: Iterative Design Lecture 2: Iterative Design

Description

Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

rules | rules | strategy | strategy | iterative design | iterative design | playtesting | playtesting | core mechanic | core mechanic | core dynamic | core dynamic | game design tools | game design tools | emergent behavior | emergent behavior | brainstorming | brainstorming | user feedback | user feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT)

Description

The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i

Subjects

Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | deep Earth | lower mantle | outer core | integrated seismological | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | CMB detection and topography | D'' anisotropy | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | ultra-low velocity zones) | temperature | chemical reactions | phase relations | mineral fabrications | cmb detection | topography | mineral physics | geodynamical perspectives | D" Region | ultra-low velocity zones | partial melting | mineral texture | core rigidity zones | sedimentation | mantle flow | core mantle coupling | geomagnetic field

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | general equilibrium | externalities | Afriat's theorem | pricing | robust comparative statics | utility theory | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | revealed preference | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | increasing differences | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | government intervention | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | common property externalities | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | core | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | incentives | housing markets core mechanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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髇 髇

Description

En esta asignatura veremos una versi髇 integrada de los contextos de operaciones, organizativos y conductuales en los que se desenvuelven los sistemas de informaci髇 contables. El objetivo del curso es exponer aquellos temas relacionados con la informaci髇 que normalmente utiliza la alta direcci髇 en sus procesos de control o de toma de decisiones. En esta asignatura veremos una versi髇 integrada de los contextos de operaciones, organizativos y conductuales en los que se desenvuelven los sistemas de informaci髇 contables. El objetivo del curso es exponer aquellos temas relacionados con la informaci髇 que normalmente utiliza la alta direcci髇 en sus procesos de control o de toma de decisiones.

Subjects

| | Presupuestos | Presupuestos | Economia Financiera y Contabilidad | Economia Financiera y Contabilidad | Benchmatking | Benchmatking | 髇 de ERP | 髇 de ERP | 韉icas | 韉icas | 髇 y Direcci髇 de Empresas | 髇 y Direcci髇 de Empresas | Contabilidad | Contabilidad | Balanced Scorecard | Balanced Scorecard | ABC-ABM | ABC-ABM | 2008 | 2008

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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15.997 Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT) 15.997 Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT)

Description

This is a course on how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm — any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Among the topics we will discuss are how companies manage risk, instruments for hedging, liability management and organization, governance and control. This is a course on how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm — any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Among the topics we will discuss are how companies manage risk, instruments for hedging, liability management and organization, governance and control.

Subjects

advanced corporate risk management | advanced corporate risk management | derivatives | futures and options | derivatives | futures and options | financial engineering | financial engineering | corporations | corporations | risk management | risk management | pricing models | pricing models | operations | operations | real assets | real assets | core strategy | core strategy | trading operations | trading operations | contracts | contracts | hedging | hedging | corporate governance | corporate governance | shareholders | shareholders | valuation | valuation | liability management | liability management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice. This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | core writings | core writings | changing nature of community | changing nature of community | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | technological change | technological change | built environment | built environment | human behavior | human behavior | paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship | paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship | urban planning skills and sensibilities | urban planning skills and sensibilities

License

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12.301 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT) 12.301 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history; methods for detecting climate change, including proxies, ice cores, instrumental records, and time series analysis; physical and chemical processes in climate, including primordial atmosphere, ozone chemistry, carbon and oxygen cycles, and heat and water budgets; internal feedback mechanisms, including ice, aerosols, water vapor, clouds, and ocean circulation; climate forcing, including orbital variations, volcanism, plate tectonics, and solar variability; climate models and mechanisms of variability, including energy balance, coupled models, and global ocean and atmosphere models; and outstanding problems. This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history; methods for detecting climate change, including proxies, ice cores, instrumental records, and time series analysis; physical and chemical processes in climate, including primordial atmosphere, ozone chemistry, carbon and oxygen cycles, and heat and water budgets; internal feedback mechanisms, including ice, aerosols, water vapor, clouds, and ocean circulation; climate forcing, including orbital variations, volcanism, plate tectonics, and solar variability; climate models and mechanisms of variability, including energy balance, coupled models, and global ocean and atmosphere models; and outstanding problems.

Subjects

climate | climate | climate change | climate change | proxies | proxies | ice cores | ice cores | primordial atmosphere | primordial atmosphere | ozone chemistry | ozone chemistry | carbon and oxygen cycles | carbon and oxygen cycles | heat and water budgets | heat and water budgets | aerosols | aerosols | water vapor | water vapor | clouds | clouds | ocean circulation | ocean circulation | orbital variations | orbital variations | volcanism | volcanism | plate tectonics | plate tectonics | solar system | solar system | solar variability | solar variability | climate model | climate model | energy balance | energy balance

License

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22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT) 22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors are presented. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers. In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors are presented. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel cycle | nuclear fuel cycle | uranium supply | uranium supply | enrichment fuel fabrication | enrichment fuel fabrication | in-core physics | in-core physics | fuel cycle economics | fuel cycle economics | applied reactor physics | applied reactor physics | Nonproliferation aspects | Nonproliferation aspects | disposal of excess weapons plutonium | disposal of excess weapons plutonium | transmutation of actinides | transmutation of actinides | fission products | fission products | spent fuel | spent fuel

License

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12.301 Past and Present Climate (12.301) / Climate Physics and Chemistry (12.842) (MIT) 12.301 Past and Present Climate (12.301) / Climate Physics and Chemistry (12.842) (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history. This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history.

Subjects

climate | climate | climate change | climate change | proxies | proxies | ice cores | ice cores | primordial atmosphere | primordial atmosphere | ozone chemistry | ozone chemistry | carbon and oxygen cycles | carbon and oxygen cycles | heat and water budgets | heat and water budgets | aerosols | aerosols | water vapor | water vapor | clouds | clouds | ocean circulation | ocean circulation | orbital variations | orbital variations | volcanism | volcanism | plate tectonics | plate tectonics | solar system | solar system | solar variability | solar variability | climate model | climate model | energy balance | energy balance

License

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12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT) 12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT)

Description

This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology).Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files. This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology).Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.

Subjects

history of the earth-surface environment | history of the earth-surface environment | deep-sea sediments | deep-sea sediments | ice cores | ice cores | corals | corals | Micropaleontological | Micropaleontological | isotopic | isotopic | geochemical | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | and mineralogical changes | seawater composition | seawater composition | atmospheric chemistry | atmospheric chemistry | climate | climate | ocean temperature | ocean temperature | circulation | circulation | chemistry | chemistry | glacial/interglacial cycles | glacial/interglacial cycles | orbital forcing | orbital forcing | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | 5. Micropaleontological | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | 5. Micropaleontological | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | Micropaleontological | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | Micropaleontological | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes

License

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Lecture 2: Iterative Design

Description

Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

rules | strategy | iterative design | playtesting | core mechanic | core dynamic | game design tools | emergent behavior | brainstorming | user feedback

License

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21M.542 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Time (MIT) 21M.542 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Time (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video, AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of three broad topics concerning music in relation to time.Music as Architecture: the creation of musical shapes in time;Music as Memory: how musical understanding depends upon memory and reminiscence, with attention to analysis of musical structures; andTime as the Substance of Music: how different disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience view the temporal dimension of musical processes and/or performances.Classroom discussion of these topics is complemented by three weekend concerts with pre-concert forums, jointly presented by the Boston Chamber Music Society (BCMS) and MIT Music & Theater Arts. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video, AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of three broad topics concerning music in relation to time.Music as Architecture: the creation of musical shapes in time;Music as Memory: how musical understanding depends upon memory and reminiscence, with attention to analysis of musical structures; andTime as the Substance of Music: how different disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience view the temporal dimension of musical processes and/or performances.Classroom discussion of these topics is complemented by three weekend concerts with pre-concert forums, jointly presented by the Boston Chamber Music Society (BCMS) and MIT Music & Theater Arts.

Subjects

musical analysis | musical analysis | music theory | music theory | music appreciation | music appreciation | music composition | music composition | music performance | music performance | temporality | temporality | physics | physics | memory | memory | film score | film score | poetry | poetry

License

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6.189 Multicore Programming Primer (MIT) 6.189 Multicore Programming Primer (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video, AV special element video. The course serves as an introductory course in parallel programming. It offers a series of lectures on parallel programming concepts as well as a group project providing hands-on experience with parallel programming. The students will have the unique opportunity to use the cutting-edge PLAYSTATION 3 development platform as they learn how to design and implement exciting applications for multicore architectures. At the end of the course, students will have an understanding of: Fundamental design philosophies that multicore architectures address. Parallel programming philosophies and emerging best practices. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a specia Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video, AV special element video. The course serves as an introductory course in parallel programming. It offers a series of lectures on parallel programming concepts as well as a group project providing hands-on experience with parallel programming. The students will have the unique opportunity to use the cutting-edge PLAYSTATION 3 development platform as they learn how to design and implement exciting applications for multicore architectures. At the end of the course, students will have an understanding of: Fundamental design philosophies that multicore architectures address. Parallel programming philosophies and emerging best practices. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a specia

Subjects

multicore architectures | multicore architectures | parallel programming patterns | parallel programming patterns | Sony PlayStation 3 | Sony PlayStation 3 | competition | competition

License

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9.675 The Development of Object and Face Recognition (MIT) 9.675 The Development of Object and Face Recognition (MIT)

Description

This course takes a 'back to the beginning' view that aims to better understand the end result. What might be the developmental processes that lead to the organization of 'booming, buzzing confusions' into coherent visual objects? This course examines key experimental results and computational proposals pertinent to the discovery of objects in complex visual inputs. The structure of the course is designed to get students to learn and to focus on the genre of study as a whole; to get a feel for how science is done in this field. This course takes a 'back to the beginning' view that aims to better understand the end result. What might be the developmental processes that lead to the organization of 'booming, buzzing confusions' into coherent visual objects? This course examines key experimental results and computational proposals pertinent to the discovery of objects in complex visual inputs. The structure of the course is designed to get students to learn and to focus on the genre of study as a whole; to get a feel for how science is done in this field.

Subjects

computational theories of human cognition | computational theories of human cognition | principles of inductive learning and inference | principles of inductive learning and inference | representation of knowledge | representation of knowledge | computational frameworks | computational frameworks | Bayesian models | Bayesian models | hierarchical Bayesian models | hierarchical Bayesian models | probabilistic graphical models | probabilistic graphical models | nonparametric statistical models | nonparametric statistical models | Bayesian Occam's razor | Bayesian Occam's razor | sampling algorithms for approximate learning and inference | sampling algorithms for approximate learning and inference | probabilistic models defined over structured representations such as first-order logic | probabilistic models defined over structured representations such as first-order logic | grammars | grammars | relational schemas | relational schemas | core aspects of cognition | core aspects of cognition | concept learning | concept learning | concept categorization | concept categorization | causal reasoning | causal reasoning | theory formation | theory formation | language acquisition | language acquisition | social inference | social inference

License

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12.842 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT) 12.842 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history. It is offered to both undergraduate and graduate students with different requirements. This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history. It is offered to both undergraduate and graduate students with different requirements.

Subjects

climate | climate | climate change | climate change | proxies | proxies | ice cores | ice cores | primordial atmosphere | primordial atmosphere | ozone chemistry | ozone chemistry | carbon and oxygen cycles | carbon and oxygen cycles | heat and water budgets | heat and water budgets | aerosols | aerosols | water vapor | water vapor | clouds | clouds | ocean circulation | ocean circulation | orbital variations | orbital variations | volcanism | volcanism | plate tectonics | plate tectonics | solar system | solar system | solar variability | solar variability | climate model | climate model | energy balance | energy balance

License

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12.753 Geodynamics Seminar (MIT) 12.753 Geodynamics Seminar (MIT)

Description

In this year's Geodynamics Seminar, we will explore the depth and breadth of scientific research related to Earth's present and past ice-sheets, glaciers and sea-ice, as well as extraterrestrial planetary ice. Invited speakers have been chosen from experts in the current frontiers in ice-related research, including planetary ice, climate records from polar and tropical ice cores, the Snowball Earth, subglacial volcanoes, ice rheology, ice sheet modeling, ice microkinetics, glacial erosion and tectonics, subglacial life and polar remote sensing. A field trip to Iceland in Summer 2006 will allow us to view some of the island's ice caps and glacial geology, the exposed mid Atlantic Ridge and evidence of ice-volcano interactions. In this year's Geodynamics Seminar, we will explore the depth and breadth of scientific research related to Earth's present and past ice-sheets, glaciers and sea-ice, as well as extraterrestrial planetary ice. Invited speakers have been chosen from experts in the current frontiers in ice-related research, including planetary ice, climate records from polar and tropical ice cores, the Snowball Earth, subglacial volcanoes, ice rheology, ice sheet modeling, ice microkinetics, glacial erosion and tectonics, subglacial life and polar remote sensing. A field trip to Iceland in Summer 2006 will allow us to view some of the island's ice caps and glacial geology, the exposed mid Atlantic Ridge and evidence of ice-volcano interactions.

Subjects

ice-related research | ice-related research | planetary ice | planetary ice | climate records: polar and tropical ice cores | climate records: polar and tropical ice cores | Snowball Earth | Snowball Earth | subglacial volcanoes | subglacial volcanoes | ice rheology | ice rheology | ice sheet modeling | ice sheet modeling | ice microkinetics | ice microkinetics | glacial erosion and tectonics | glacial erosion and tectonics | subglacial life and polar remote sensing | subglacial life and polar remote sensing | iceland | iceland | glacial geology | glacial geology | mid-atlantic ridge | mid-atlantic ridge | present and past ice-sheets | present and past ice-sheets | glaciers | glaciers | sea-ice | sea-ice | extraterrestrial planetary ice | extraterrestrial planetary ice

License

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14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT) 14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice. This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | mechanism design | mechanism design | auction theory | auction theory | one-sided matching | one-sided matching | house allocation | house allocation | market problems | market problems | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | stability | stability | many-to-one | many-to-one | one-to-one | one-to-one | small cores | small cores | large markets | large markets | stochastic matching mechanisms | stochastic matching mechanisms | student assignment | student assignment | school choice | school choice | resale markets | resale markets | dynamics | dynamics | simplicity | simplicity | robustness | robustness | limited rationality | limited rationality | message spaces | message spaces | sharing risk | sharing risk | decentralized exchanges | decentralized exchanges | over-the-counter exchanges | over-the-counter exchanges

License

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