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21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT) 21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds. Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds.

Subjects

Age of Reason | Age of Reason | philosophy | philosophy | cultural history | cultural history | intellectual history | intellectual history | History | History | western tradition | western tradition | Antiquity | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Renaissance | Renaissance | 1600 | 1600 | 1850 | 1850 | natural sciences | natural sciences | mathematics | mathematics | social theorists | social theorists | institutional reformers | institutional reformers | political revolutionaries | political revolutionaries | change | change | themselves | themselves | society | society | trials | trials | art | art | literature | literature | theater | theater | music | music | politics | politics | culture | culture | evolution | evolution | revolution. | revolution.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches.

Subjects

history | history | theory | theory | method | method | contemporary | contemporary | twentieth century | twentieth century | social history | social history | economics | economics | primary source | primary source | narrative | narrative | analysis | analysis | cultural history | cultural history | 20th century | 20th century | Annales school | Annales school | agrarian history | agrarian history | class | class | race | race | gender | gender | historical categories | historical categories | historical demography | historical demography | new economic history | new economic history | military history | military history | environmental history | environmental history | film | film | Europe | Europe | America | America | Asia | Asia | primary sources | primary sources | 21H.991 | 21H.991 | STS.210 | STS.210

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT) 21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

A study of the evolution of European society from the end of the seventeenth century to the outbreak of World War I. Its politics, the nature of its social system, the workings of its economy, and its intellectual accomplishments. Particular attention given to the analyses made by critics and thinkers contemporary to the matters treated in the subject. A study of the evolution of European society from the end of the seventeenth century to the outbreak of World War I. Its politics, the nature of its social system, the workings of its economy, and its intellectual accomplishments. Particular attention given to the analyses made by critics and thinkers contemporary to the matters treated in the subject.

Subjects

Age of Reason | Age of Reason | philosophy | philosophy | cultural history | cultural history | intellectual history | intellectual history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.614 Religious Architecture and Islamic Cultures (MIT) 4.614 Religious Architecture and Islamic Cultures (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course introduces the history of Islamic cultures through their most vibrant material signs: the religious architecture that spans fourteen centuries and three continents — Asia, Africa, and Europe. The course presents Islamic architecture both as a historical tradition and as a cultural catalyst that influenced and was influenced by the civilizations with which it came in contact. Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course introduces the history of Islamic cultures through their most vibrant material signs: the religious architecture that spans fourteen centuries and three continents — Asia, Africa, and Europe. The course presents Islamic architecture both as a historical tradition and as a cultural catalyst that influenced and was influenced by the civilizations with which it came in contact.

Subjects

religious architecture | religious architecture | Islamic architecture | Islamic architecture | Islamic culture | Islamic culture | Islam | Islam | architectural history | architectural history | Islamic art | Islamic art | cultural history | cultural history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies? This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | history | methodology | methodology | historian | historian | analysis | analysis | oral history | oral history | comparative history | comparative history | memory | memory | narrative | narrative | language | language | sources | sources | methods | methods | organization | organization | framing | framing | and style | and style | historical writing | historical writing | political history | political history | social history | social history | cultural history | cultural history | demographics | demographics | biographical writing | biographical writing | biography | biography | auto-biography | auto-biography | historical films | historical films | fiction | fiction | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | approach | approach | style | style | evidence | evidence | methodologies | methodologies | historical accounts | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT) STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT)

Description

Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology, Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology,

Subjects

history | history | technology | technology | science | science | techne | techne | industry | industry | intellectual history | intellectual history | cultural history | cultural history | management | management | engineering | engineering | industrial arts | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanism | mechanical arts | mechanical arts | technological determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufacturing | manufactures | manufactures | factory | factory | capitalism | capitalism | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | innovation | innovation | ecology | ecology | environmentalism | environmentalism | pollution | pollution | literature | literature | American history | American history | the Enlightenment | the Enlightenment | industrialization | industrialization | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.464 Cultural History of Technology (MIT) STS.464 Cultural History of Technology (MIT)

Description

The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to y The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to y

Subjects

history | history | technology | technology | science | science | techne | techne | industry | industry | intellectual history | intellectual history | cultural history | cultural history | management | management | engineering | engineering | industrial arts | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanism | mechanic arts | mechanic arts | mechanical arts | mechanical arts | Bigelow | Bigelow | Taylorism | Taylorism | determinism | determinism | technological determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufacturing | manufactures | manufactures | factory | factory | capitalism | capitalism | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | innovation | innovation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Weird World of Seventies Britain

Description

Dominic Sandbrook is a prolific writer of books on the recent history of Britain and America, as well as a regular columnist in BBC History magazine, the Evening Standard, the Telegraph and the Sunday Times. Here he addressesses OUHS on the Seventies, a topic for which he has gained fame through his controversial thesis of continuity and conformity in place of the traditional interpretation of a radical cultural revolution. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

seventies | strikes | 1970 | unions | politics | cultural history | history | seventies | strikes | 1970 | unions | politics | cultural history | history

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Weird World of Seventies Britain

Description

Dominic Sandbrook is a prolific writer of books on the recent history of Britain and America, as well as a regular columnist in BBC History magazine, the Evening Standard, the Telegraph and the Sunday Times. Here he addressesses OUHS on the Seventies, a topic for which he has gained fame through his controversial thesis of continuity and conformity in place of the traditional interpretation of a radical cultural revolution. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

seventies | strikes | 1970 | unions | politics | cultural history | history | seventies | strikes | 1970 | unions | politics | cultural history | history

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT) CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods. This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods.

Subjects

Media | Media | mass media | mass media | history | history | Gutenberg | Gutenberg | cultural change | cultural change | cultural history | cultural history | social history | social history | historiographic method | historiographic method | books | books | medieval history | medieval history | codex book | codex book | writing | writing | printing | printing | printing press | printing press | stage | stage | theater | theater | renaissance | renaissance | romanticism | romanticism | modernity | modernity | inventions | inventions | photography | photography | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | image | image | telegraph | telegraph | electrification | electrification | communication | communication | Morse | Morse | Daguerreotype | Daguerreotype | Fox Talbot | Fox Talbot | phonograph | phonograph | sound recording | sound recording | radio | radio | broadcasting | broadcasting | film | film | video | video | cinema | cinema | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.460 Histories of Information, Communication, and Computing Technologies (MIT) STS.460 Histories of Information, Communication, and Computing Technologies (MIT)

Description

The histories of information, communication, and computing technologies have attracted attention from scholars across a variety of disciplines. This course introduces students to prominent voices in these topics across fields. Alongside readings introducing students to this broad scholarly terrain, the course offers guidance in research and writing for publication based on the reality that PhD candidates on the job market need to be published authors, and that every term paper has the potential to be a journal article. We work towards publication by reading widely-cited scholarly histories both for their content and for what they can tell us about scholarly craft. The histories of information, communication, and computing technologies have attracted attention from scholars across a variety of disciplines. This course introduces students to prominent voices in these topics across fields. Alongside readings introducing students to this broad scholarly terrain, the course offers guidance in research and writing for publication based on the reality that PhD candidates on the job market need to be published authors, and that every term paper has the potential to be a journal article. We work towards publication by reading widely-cited scholarly histories both for their content and for what they can tell us about scholarly craft.

Subjects

history | history | information | information | communication | communication | computing | computing | technology | technology | ICT | ICT | military | military | intelligence agency | intelligence agency | business | business | government | government | entertainment | entertainment | cultural history | cultural history | proto-ICT | proto-ICT | dissertation | dissertation | metanarrative | metanarrative | monograph | monograph | secondary sources | secondary sources | primary sources | primary sources | knowledge | knowledge | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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From Reformation to revolution: an introduction to early modern history c.1500-1789

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. Module Code: V11213 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 1 Credits:20 This module introduces students to major issues in the social, political and cultural history of Europe in the Early Modern period by analysing demographic, religious, social and cultural changes that took place between c.1500 and 1789. Students will examine the tensions produced by warfare, religious conflict, the changing relationships between rulers, subjects and political elites, trends in socio-economic development and the discovery of the ‘New World’. This crucially important period witnessed Europe split by the religious differences of the Reformation, shaken by local rebellions an

Subjects

UNow | ukoer | Module Code: V11213 | social | political and cultural history of Europe in the early modern period | rulers | subjects and political elites | trends in socio-economic development | ‘New World’ | Reformation

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods.

Subjects

Media | mass media | history | Gutenberg | cultural change | cultural history | social history | historiographic method | books | medieval history | codex book | writing | printing | printing press | stage | theater | renaissance | romanticism | modernity | inventions | photography | nineteenth century | image | telegraph | electrification | communication | Morse | Daguerreotype | Fox Talbot | phonograph | sound recording | radio | broadcasting | film | video | cinema | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds.

Subjects

Age of Reason | philosophy | cultural history | intellectual history | History | western tradition | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Renaissance | 1600 | 1850 | natural sciences | mathematics | social theorists | institutional reformers | political revolutionaries | change | themselves | society | trials | art | literature | theater | music | politics | culture | evolution | revolution.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches.

Subjects

history | theory | method | contemporary | twentieth century | social history | economics | primary source | narrative | analysis | cultural history | 20th century | Annales school | agrarian history | class | race | gender | historical categories | historical demography | new economic history | military history | environmental history | film | Europe | America | Asia | primary sources | 21H.991 | STS.210

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

A study of the evolution of European society from the end of the seventeenth century to the outbreak of World War I. Its politics, the nature of its social system, the workings of its economy, and its intellectual accomplishments. Particular attention given to the analyses made by critics and thinkers contemporary to the matters treated in the subject.

Subjects

Age of Reason | philosophy | cultural history | intellectual history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.614 Religious Architecture and Islamic Cultures (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the history of Islamic cultures through their most vibrant material signs: the religious architecture that spans fourteen centuries and three continents — Asia, Africa, and Europe. The course presents Islamic architecture both as a historical tradition and as a cultural catalyst that influenced and was influenced by the civilizations with which it came in contact.

Subjects

religious architecture | Islamic architecture | Islamic culture | Islam | architectural history | Islamic art | cultural history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | methodology | historian | analysis | oral history | comparative history | memory | narrative | language | sources | methods | organization | framing | and style | historical writing | political history | social history | cultural history | demographics | biographical writing | biography | auto-biography | historical films | fiction | memoirs | conventional history | approach | style | evidence | methodologies | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.460 Histories of Information, Communication, and Computing Technologies (MIT)

Description

The histories of information, communication, and computing technologies have attracted attention from scholars across a variety of disciplines. This course introduces students to prominent voices in these topics across fields. Alongside readings introducing students to this broad scholarly terrain, the course offers guidance in research and writing for publication based on the reality that PhD candidates on the job market need to be published authors, and that every term paper has the potential to be a journal article. We work towards publication by reading widely-cited scholarly histories both for their content and for what they can tell us about scholarly craft.

Subjects

history | information | communication | computing | technology | ICT | military | intelligence agency | business | government | entertainment | cultural history | proto-ICT | dissertation | metanarrative | monograph | secondary sources | primary sources | knowledge | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT)

Description

Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology,

Subjects

history | technology | science | techne | industry | intellectual history | cultural history | management | engineering | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanical arts | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufactures | factory | capitalism | entrepreneurship | innovation | ecology | environmentalism | pollution | literature | American history | the Enlightenment | industrialization | Industrial Revolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.464 Cultural History of Technology (MIT)

Description

The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to y

Subjects

history | technology | science | techne | industry | intellectual history | cultural history | management | engineering | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanic arts | mechanical arts | Bigelow | Taylorism | determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufactures | factory | capitalism | entrepreneurship | innovation

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