Searching for demographics : 19 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT) 14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information 14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analytical tools | analysis | analysis | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | coordintation | coordintation | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | technolgy | technolgy | distribution | distribution | employment | employment | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | demographics | demographics | complementarities | complementarities | amplification | amplification | recursive equilibria | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | uncertainty | morris | morris | shin | shin | global games | global games | policy | policy | price | price | aggregation | aggregation | social learning | social learning | dynamic adjustment | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | heterogeneous agents | savings | savings | utility | utility | aiyagari | aiyagari | steady state | steady state | krusell | krusell | smith | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | growth | fluctuations | fluctuations | heterogeneity | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | time inconsistency | reputation | reputation | information | information | coordination games | coordination games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century. This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | historical writing | politics | politics | social | social | culture | culture | demographics | demographics | biography | biography | environment | environment | comparative literature | comparative literature | film | film | fiction | fiction | memoir | memoir | methodology | methodology | political | political | cultural | cultural | demographic | demographic | biographical | biographical | comparative | comparative | historical films | historical films | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | methods | methods | historians | historians | interpretation | interpretation | archives | archives | archivists | archivists | archival findings | archival findings | history | history | national identity | national identity | philosophy of history | philosophy of history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies? This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | history | methodology | methodology | historian | historian | analysis | analysis | oral history | oral history | comparative history | comparative history | memory | memory | narrative | narrative | language | language | sources | sources | methods | methods | organization | organization | framing | framing | and style | and style | historical writing | historical writing | political history | political history | social history | social history | cultural history | cultural history | demographics | demographics | biographical writing | biographical writing | biography | biography | auto-biography | auto-biography | historical films | historical films | fiction | fiction | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | approach | approach | style | style | evidence | evidence | methodologies | methodologies | historical accounts | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

SP.256 The Coming Years (MIT) SP.256 The Coming Years (MIT)

Description

Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies. Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies.

Subjects

futurology | futurology | historiography | historiography | change | change | fractals | fractals | nuclear war | nuclear war | global warming | global warming | bioterrorism | bioterrorism | singularity | singularity | politics | politics | memetics | memetics | demographics | demographics | power laws | power laws | recent past | recent past | near future | near future | prediction | prediction | history | history | revolution | revolution | memes | memes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.049J Technology and Gender in American History (MIT) STS.049J Technology and Gender in American History (MIT)

Description

This course centers on the changing relationships between men, women, and technology in American history. Topics include theories of gender, technologies of production and consumption, the gendering of public and private space, men's and women's roles in science and technology, the effects of industrialization on sexual divisions of labor, gender and identity at home and at work. This course centers on the changing relationships between men, women, and technology in American history. Topics include theories of gender, technologies of production and consumption, the gendering of public and private space, men's and women's roles in science and technology, the effects of industrialization on sexual divisions of labor, gender and identity at home and at work.

Subjects

history | history | gender | gender | american history | american history | technology | technology | history of technology | history of technology | culture | culture | identity | identity | twentieth century | twentieth century | modern | modern | industrialization | industrialization | demographics | demographics | women | women | systems | systems | modernity | modernity | STS.049 | STS.049

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Space-Time as a Sampling Condition for New Social Media Research (Knowledge Exchange Seminar)

Description

Luke Sloan discusses space-time as a sampling condition for new social media research during a seminar on quantitative methods in social media research held at the OII on 26 September 2012. This brief talk introduces some of the issues that social scientists will have to contend with when applying traditional terrestrial modes of analysis to social media data. Based on the potential user requirements of the platform being developed at the Cardiff Online Social Media ObServatory (COSMOS), this talk reviews the need to reconceptualise sampling, demographics, geography and the temporal dimension with reference to naturally occurring locomotive data. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social media research | social media | demographics | quantitative methods | knowledge exchange | internet | sampling | data | geography | social media research | social media | demographics | quantitative methods | knowledge exchange | internet | sampling | data | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129021/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Space-Time as a Sampling Condition for New Social Media Research (Knowledge Exchange Seminar)

Description

Luke Sloan discusses space-time as a sampling condition for new social media research during a seminar on quantitative methods in social media research held at the OII on 26 September 2012. This brief talk introduces some of the issues that social scientists will have to contend with when applying traditional terrestrial modes of analysis to social media data. Based on the potential user requirements of the platform being developed at the Cardiff Online Social Media ObServatory (COSMOS), this talk reviews the need to reconceptualise sampling, demographics, geography and the temporal dimension with reference to naturally occurring locomotive data. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social media research | social media | demographics | quantitative methods | knowledge exchange | internet | sampling | data | geography | social media research | social media | demographics | quantitative methods | knowledge exchange | internet | sampling | data | geography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129021/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.263 U.S. National Elections (MIT) 17.263 U.S. National Elections (MIT)

Description

This course provides a selective overview of electoral politics in the United States, with an emphasis on presidential and congressional elections. It examines the macro-level determinants of electoral outcomes as well as the political behavior of individual Americans. Each week covers a different topic, with readings designed to highlight controversies or debates in the political science literature. This course provides a selective overview of electoral politics in the United States, with an emphasis on presidential and congressional elections. It examines the macro-level determinants of electoral outcomes as well as the political behavior of individual Americans. Each week covers a different topic, with readings designed to highlight controversies or debates in the political science literature.

Subjects

election | election | barack obama | barack obama | mitt romney | mitt romney | hillary clinton | hillary clinton | political geography | political geography | realignment | realignment | political parties | political parties | democrat | democrat | republican | republican | incumbency advantage | incumbency advantage | electoral college | electoral college | partisan | partisan | demographics | demographics | campaigns | campaigns | constituencies | constituencies | voters | voters | voting | voting | gridlock | gridlock | campaign finance reform | campaign finance reform | lobbying | lobbying | campaign spending | campaign spending | citizens united | citizens united | referendums | referendums | turnout | turnout | representation | representation | governance | governance | government | government | inequality | inequality | gerrymandering | gerrymandering | redistricting | redistricting | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ES.256 The Coming Years (MIT) ES.256 The Coming Years (MIT)

Description

Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies. Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies.

Subjects

futurology | futurology | historiography | historiography | change | change | fractals | fractals | nuclear war | nuclear war | global warming | global warming | bioterrorism | bioterrorism | singularity | singularity | politics | politics | memetics | memetics | demographics | demographics | power laws | power laws | recent past | recent past | near future | near future | prediction | prediction | history | history | revolution | revolution | memes | memes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-ES.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The history of the future

Description

The founders lecture 2016, by eminent historian and Honorary Fellow, Professor Sir Brian Harrison, FBA. The talk explores changing attitudes to the future and the reasons for them. This involves thinking about the changing relationship between past, present and future, and studying the attitudes and activities of people and professions claiming to be able to predict or even influence the future ? such as statisticians, planners, demographers, actuaries, inventors, authors of utopias and dystopias, and religious visionaries. The lecture aims to set in perspective the importance (or otherwise) of historical study. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

futurology | statistics | demographics | futurology | statistics | demographics | 2016-05-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129217/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analysis | endogenous growth | coordintation | incomplete markets | technolgy | distribution | employment | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | demographics | complementarities | amplification | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | morris | shin | global games | policy | price | aggregation | social learning | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | savings | utility | aiyagari | steady state | krusell | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | fluctuations | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | reputation | information | coordination games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ES.SP.256 The Coming Years (MIT)

Description

Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies.

Subjects

futurology | historiography | change | fractals | nuclear war | global warming | bioterrorism | singularity | politics | memetics | demographics | power laws | recent past | near future | prediction | history | revolution | memes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-ES.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Customer Wants and Needs - Mini Lecture

Description

An introductory mini-lecture about understanding our customers and what it is that they want.

Subjects

customer | customers | customer needs | marketing | demographics | consumers | employability | ukoer | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | politics | social | culture | demographics | biography | environment | comparative literature | film | fiction | memoir | methodology | political | cultural | demographic | biographical | comparative | historical films | memoirs | conventional history | methods | historians | interpretation | archives | archivists | archival findings | history | national identity | philosophy of history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | methodology | historian | analysis | oral history | comparative history | memory | narrative | language | sources | methods | organization | framing | and style | historical writing | political history | social history | cultural history | demographics | biographical writing | biography | auto-biography | historical films | fiction | memoirs | conventional history | approach | style | evidence | methodologies | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ES.256 The Coming Years (MIT)

Description

Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies.

Subjects

futurology | historiography | change | fractals | nuclear war | global warming | bioterrorism | singularity | politics | memetics | demographics | power laws | recent past | near future | prediction | history | revolution | memes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.049J Technology and Gender in American History (MIT)

Description

This course centers on the changing relationships between men, women, and technology in American history. Topics include theories of gender, technologies of production and consumption, the gendering of public and private space, men's and women's roles in science and technology, the effects of industrialization on sexual divisions of labor, gender and identity at home and at work.

Subjects

history | gender | american history | technology | history of technology | culture | identity | twentieth century | modern | industrialization | demographics | women | systems | modernity | STS.049

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.263 U.S. National Elections (MIT)

Description

This course provides a selective overview of electoral politics in the United States, with an emphasis on presidential and congressional elections. It examines the macro-level determinants of electoral outcomes as well as the political behavior of individual Americans. Each week covers a different topic, with readings designed to highlight controversies or debates in the political science literature.

Subjects

election | barack obama | mitt romney | hillary clinton | political geography | realignment | political parties | democrat | republican | incumbency advantage | electoral college | partisan | demographics | campaigns | constituencies | voters | voting | gridlock | campaign finance reform | lobbying | campaign spending | citizens united | referendums | turnout | representation | governance | government | inequality | gerrymandering | redistricting | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.006 Poverty and Economic Security (MIT)

Description

This course explores the evolution of poverty and economic security in the United States, within a global context. It examines the impact of recent economic restructuring and globalization, and reviews the current debate about the fate of the middle class, sources of increasing inequality, and approaches to advancing economic opportunity and security. In this class, students will study the topic of poverty and economic security through the lens of the lived experience of Americans: individuals, families, and households; exploring the history, geography, and forces shaping the likelihood of being poor in America.

Subjects

poverty | economic security | global poverty | economic status | employment | economic disparity | economic inequality | equitable distribution of wealth | middle class economy | economic insecurity | working poor | demographics | income | race | economic class

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata