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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields | P-representation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | quantum teleportation | quantum teleportation

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum teleportation

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

6.453 Quantum Optical Communication is one of a collection of MIT classes that deals with aspects of an emerging field known as quantum information science. This course covers Quantum Optics, Single-Mode and Two-Mode Quantum Systems, Multi-Mode Quantum Systems, Nonlinear Optics, and Quantum System Theory.

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | Prepresentation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: Commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: Direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: Phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT) 12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT)

Description

The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i

Subjects

Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | deep Earth | deep Earth | lower mantle | lower mantle | outer core | outer core | integrated seismological | integrated seismological | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | CMB detection and topography | CMB detection and topography | D'' anisotropy | D'' anisotropy | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | ultra-low velocity zones) | ultra-low velocity zones) | temperature | temperature | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | phase relations | phase relations | mineral fabrications | mineral fabrications | cmb detection | cmb detection | topography | topography | mineral physics | mineral physics | geodynamical perspectives | geodynamical perspectives | D" Region | D" Region | ultra-low velocity zones | ultra-low velocity zones | partial melting | partial melting | mineral texture | mineral texture | core rigidity zones | core rigidity zones | sedimentation | sedimentation | mantle flow | mantle flow | core mantle coupling | core mantle coupling | geomagnetic field | geomagnetic field

License

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16.36 Communication Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.36 Communication Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course will cover fundamentals of digital communications and networking. We will study the basics of information theory, sampling and quantization, coding, modulation, signal detection and system performance in the presence of noise. The study of data networking will include multiple access, reliable packet transmission, routing and protocols of the internet. The concepts taught in class will be discussed in the context of aerospace communication systems: aircraft communications, satellite communications, and deep space communications. This course will cover fundamentals of digital communications and networking. We will study the basics of information theory, sampling and quantization, coding, modulation, signal detection and system performance in the presence of noise. The study of data networking will include multiple access, reliable packet transmission, routing and protocols of the internet. The concepts taught in class will be discussed in the context of aerospace communication systems: aircraft communications, satellite communications, and deep space communications.

Subjects

digital communications | digital communications | networking | networking | information theory | information theory | sampling | sampling | quantization | quantization | coding | coding | modulation | modulation | signal detection | signal detection | data networking | data networking | multiple access | multiple access | packet transmission | packet transmission | routing | routing | aerospace communication | aerospace communication | aircraft communication | aircraft communication | satellite communication | satellite communication | deep space communication | deep space communication | communication systems haykin | communication systems haykin | computer networks tanenbaum | computer networks tanenbaum | communication systems engineering proakis | communication systems engineering proakis | sampling theorem | sampling theorem | entropy | entropy | signal detection in noise | signal detection in noise | delay models | delay models

License

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22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT) 22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation. An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation.

Subjects

general imaging principles | | general imaging principles | | linear optics | | linear optics | | ray tracing | | ray tracing | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Space Invariance | | Space Invariance | | Pin-hole camera | | Pin-hole camera | | Fourier Transformations | | Fourier Transformations | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Fourier convolution | | Fourier convolution | | Sampling | | Sampling | | Nyquist | | Nyquist | | counting statistics | | counting statistics | | additive noise | | additive noise | | optical imaging | | optical imaging | | Radiation types | | Radiation types | | Radiation detection | | Radiation detection | | photon detection | | photon detection | | spectra | | spectra | | attenuation | | attenuation | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Projective Imaging | | Projective Imaging | | X-ray CT | | X-ray CT | | Ultrasound | | Ultrasound | | microscopy | k-space | | microscopy | k-space | | NMR pulses | | NMR pulses | | f2-D gradient | | f2-D gradient | | spin echoes | | spin echoes | | 3-D methods of MRI | | 3-D methods of MRI | | volume localized spectroscopy | volume localized spectroscopy

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment. 6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | identification | identification | intrusion detection | intrusion detection | virus | virus | operating system | operating system | software | software | protection | protection | electronic mail | electronic mail | email | email | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | electronic cash | electronic cash | firewall | firewall | computer | computer | digital | digital | signature | signature | electronic | electronic | cash | cash | commerce | commerce | mail | mail | operating | operating | system | system | intrustion | intrustion | detection | detection | distributed | distributed | physical | physical | discretionary | discretionary | mandatory | mandatory | access | access | control | control | biometrics | biometrics | information | information | flow | flow | models | models | covert | covert | channels | channels | integrity | integrity | logic | logic | voting | voting | risk | risk | assessment | assessment | secure | secure | web | web | browsers | browsers | architecture | architecture | engineering | engineering | certificates | certificates | multi-user computer systems | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | physical security | discretionary access control | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | information-flow models | covert channels | covert channels | integrity models | integrity models | elementary cryptography | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | viruses | firewalls | firewalls | electronic voting | electronic voting | risk assessment | risk assessment | secure web browsers | secure web browsers | network security | network security | architecture engineering | architecture engineering | digital signatures | digital signatures | authentication schemes | authentication schemes | identification schemes | identification schemes | formal models | formal models | secure operating systems | secure operating systems | software protection | software protection | electronic mail security | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | World Wide Web | ecommerce | ecommerce | email security | email security | www | www | payment protocols | payment protocols | authentication logic | authentication logic

License

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6.852J Distributed Algorithms (MIT) 6.852J Distributed Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course intends to provide a rigorous introduction to the most important research results in the area of distributed algorithms, and prepare interested students to carry out independent research in distributed algorithms. Topics covered include: design and analysis of concurrent algorithms, emphasizing those suitable for use in distributed networks, process synchronization, allocation of computational resources, distributed consensus, distributed graph algorithms, election of a leader in a network, distributed termination, deadlock detection, concurrency control, communication, and clock synchronization. Special consideration is given to issues of efficiency and fault tolerance. Formal models and proof methods for distributed computation are also discussed. Detailed information on the This course intends to provide a rigorous introduction to the most important research results in the area of distributed algorithms, and prepare interested students to carry out independent research in distributed algorithms. Topics covered include: design and analysis of concurrent algorithms, emphasizing those suitable for use in distributed networks, process synchronization, allocation of computational resources, distributed consensus, distributed graph algorithms, election of a leader in a network, distributed termination, deadlock detection, concurrency control, communication, and clock synchronization. Special consideration is given to issues of efficiency and fault tolerance. Formal models and proof methods for distributed computation are also discussed. Detailed information on the

Subjects

distributed algorithms | distributed algorithms | algorithm | algorithm | concurrent algorithms | concurrent algorithms | distributed networks | distributed networks | process synchronization | process synchronization | computational resources | computational resources | distributed consensus | distributed consensus | distributed graph algorithms | distributed graph algorithms | distributed termination | distributed termination | deadlock detection | deadlock detection | concurrency control | concurrency control | communication | communication | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | fault tolerance | fault tolerance | distributed computation | distributed computation | 6.852 | 6.852 | 18.437 | 18.437

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. 9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | human perception | human perception | cognition | cognition | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | signal detection theory | signal detection theory | single factor design | single factor design | factorial design | factorial design | matlab | matlab | correlational studies | correlational studies | ethics in research | ethics in research

License

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16.36 Communication Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.36 Communication Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

16.36 covers the fundamentals of digital communications and networking, including the basics of information theory, sampling and quantization, coding, modulation, signal detection and system performance in the presence of noise. The study of data networking includes multiple access, reliable packet transmission, routing and protocols of the internet. The concepts taught in class are discussed in the context of aerospace communication systems: aircraft communications, satellite communications, and deep space communications. 16.36 covers the fundamentals of digital communications and networking, including the basics of information theory, sampling and quantization, coding, modulation, signal detection and system performance in the presence of noise. The study of data networking includes multiple access, reliable packet transmission, routing and protocols of the internet. The concepts taught in class are discussed in the context of aerospace communication systems: aircraft communications, satellite communications, and deep space communications.

Subjects

communication systems engineering | communication systems engineering | digital communications | digital communications | networking | networking | information theory | information theory | sampling and quantization | sampling and quantization | modulation | modulation | signal detection | signal detection | system performance | system performance | aerospace communications systems | aerospace communications systems | data networking | data networking

License

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SP.776 Design for Demining (MIT) SP.776 Design for Demining (MIT)

Description

Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting, removing and disposing of landmines. Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in 20,000 civilian victims every year. MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment. Technical, business and customer aspects are addressed. Students learn about demining while they design, develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community. Past students have invented or improved hand tools, protective gear, safety equipment, educational graphics and teaching materials. Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands. Course work is Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting, removing and disposing of landmines. Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in 20,000 civilian victims every year. MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment. Technical, business and customer aspects are addressed. Students learn about demining while they design, develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community. Past students have invented or improved hand tools, protective gear, safety equipment, educational graphics and teaching materials. Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands. Course work is

Subjects

humanitarian demining | humanitarian demining | landmines | landmines | landmine detection | landmine detection | landmine removal | landmine removal | landmine disposal | landmine disposal | landmines in 80 countries | landmines in 80 countries | 20 | 000 civilian victims per year | 20 | 000 civilian victims per year | MIT Design for Demining | MIT Design for Demining | product design | product design | development process | development process | identification of needs | identification of needs | idea generation | idea generation | prototyping | prototyping | blast testing | blast testing | manufacture | manufacture | deployment | deployment | demining community | demining community | hand tools | hand tools | protective gear | protective gear | safety equipment | safety equipment | educational graphics | educational graphics | teaching materials | teaching materials | field trip | field trip | US Army base | US Army base | demining training | demining training

License

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6.450 Principles of Digital Communication - I (MIT) 6.450 Principles of Digital Communication - I (MIT)

Description

6.450 was offered in Fall 2002 as a relatively new elective on digital communication. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring.Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication. 6.450 was offered in Fall 2002 as a relatively new elective on digital communication. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring.Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | digital communication | data compression | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | scalar quantization | vector quantization | vector quantization | sampling | sampling | aliasing | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | detection | communication system design | communication system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.852J Distributed Algorithms (MIT) 6.852J Distributed Algorithms (MIT)

Description

6.852J / 18.437J intends to: (1) provide a rigorous introduction to the most important research results in the area of distributed algorithms, and (2) prepare interested students to carry out independent research in distributed algorithms. Topics covered include: design and analysis of concurrent algorithms, emphasizing those suitable for use in distributed networks, process synchronization, allocation of computational resources, distributed consensus, distributed graph algorithms, election of a leader in a network, distributed termination, deadlock detection, concurrency control, communication, and clock synchronization. Special consideration is given to issues of efficiency and fault tolerance. Formal models and proof methods for distributed computation are also discussed. 6.852J / 18.437J intends to: (1) provide a rigorous introduction to the most important research results in the area of distributed algorithms, and (2) prepare interested students to carry out independent research in distributed algorithms. Topics covered include: design and analysis of concurrent algorithms, emphasizing those suitable for use in distributed networks, process synchronization, allocation of computational resources, distributed consensus, distributed graph algorithms, election of a leader in a network, distributed termination, deadlock detection, concurrency control, communication, and clock synchronization. Special consideration is given to issues of efficiency and fault tolerance. Formal models and proof methods for distributed computation are also discussed.

Subjects

distributed algorithms | distributed algorithms | algorithm | algorithm | concurrent algorithms | concurrent algorithms | distributed networks | distributed networks | process synchronization | process synchronization | computational resources | computational resources | distributed consensus | distributed consensus | distributed graph algorithms | distributed graph algorithms | distributed termination | distributed termination | deadlock detection | deadlock detection | concurrency control | concurrency control | communication | communication | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | fault tolerance | fault tolerance | distributed computation | distributed computation | 6.852 | 6.852 | 18.437 | 18.437

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.29J Introduction to Computational Neuroscience (MIT) 9.29J Introduction to Computational Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

Mathematical introduction to neural coding and dynamics. Convolution, correlation, linear systems, Fourier analysis, signal detection theory, probability theory, and information theory. Applications to neural coding, focusing on the visual system. Hodgkin-Huxley and related models of neural excitability, stochastic models of ion channels, cable theory, and models of synaptic transmission. Mathematical introduction to neural coding and dynamics. Convolution, correlation, linear systems, Fourier analysis, signal detection theory, probability theory, and information theory. Applications to neural coding, focusing on the visual system. Hodgkin-Huxley and related models of neural excitability, stochastic models of ion channels, cable theory, and models of synaptic transmission.

Subjects

neural coding | neural coding | dynamics | dynamics | convolution | convolution | correlation | correlation | linear systems | linear systems | Fourier analysis | Fourier analysis | signal detection theory | signal detection theory | probability theory | probability theory | information theory | information theory | neural excitability | neural excitability | stochastic models | stochastic models | ion channels | ion channels | cable theory | cable theory | 9.29 | 9.29 | 8.261 | 8.261

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.450 Principles of Digital Communications I (MIT) 6.450 Principles of Digital Communications I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | digital communication | data compression | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | scalar quantization | vector quantization | vector quantization | sampling | sampling | aliasing | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | detection | communication system design | communication system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.011 Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing (MIT) 6.011 Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This course examines signals, systems and inference as unifying themes in communication, control and signal processing. Topics include input-output and state-space models of linear systems driven by deterministic and random signals; time- and transform-domain representations in discrete and continuous time; group delay; state feedback and observers; probabilistic models; stochastic processes, correlation functions, power spectra, spectral factorization; least-mean square error estimation; Wiener filtering; hypothesis testing; detection; matched filters. This course examines signals, systems and inference as unifying themes in communication, control and signal processing. Topics include input-output and state-space models of linear systems driven by deterministic and random signals; time- and transform-domain representations in discrete and continuous time; group delay; state feedback and observers; probabilistic models; stochastic processes, correlation functions, power spectra, spectral factorization; least-mean square error estimation; Wiener filtering; hypothesis testing; detection; matched filters.

Subjects

signals and systems | signals and systems | transform representation | transform representation | state-space models | state-space models | state observers | state observers | state feedback | state feedback | probabilistic models | probabilistic models | random processes | random processes | power spectral density | power spectral density | hypothesis testing | hypothesis testing | signal detection | signal detection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.450 Principles of Digital Communication I (MIT) 6.450 Principles of Digital Communication I (MIT)

Description

The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication. The course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice behind many of today's communications systems. 6.450 forms the first of a two-course sequence on digital communication. The second class, 6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II, is offered in the spring. Topics covered include: digital communications at the block diagram level, data compression, Lempel-Ziv algorithm, scalar and vector quantization, sampling and aliasing, the Nyquist criterion, PAM and QAM modulation, signal constellations, finite-energy waveform spaces, detection, and modeling and system design for wireless communication.

Subjects

digital communication | digital communication | data compression | data compression | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | Lempel-Ziv algorithm | scalar quantization | scalar quantization | vector quantization | vector quantization | sampling | sampling | aliasing | aliasing | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | PAM modulation | PAM modulation | QAM modulation | QAM modulation | signal constellations | signal constellations | finite-energy waveform spaces | finite-energy waveform spaces | detection | detection | communication system design | communication system design | wireless | wireless | discrete source encoding | discrete source encoding | memory-less sources | memory-less sources | entropy | entropy | asymptotic equipartition property | asymptotic equipartition property | Fourier series | Fourier series | Fourier transforms | Fourier transforms | sampling theorem | sampling theorem | orthonormal expansions | orthonormal expansions | random processes | random processes | linear functionals | linear functionals | theorem of irrelevance | theorem of irrelevance | Doppler spread | Doppler spread | time spread | time spread | coherence time | coherence time | coherence frequency | coherence frequency | Rayleigh fading | Rayleigh fading | Rake receivers | Rake receivers | CDMA | CDMA | code division multiple access | code division multiple access

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.895 Theory of Parallel Systems (SMA 5509) (MIT) 6.895 Theory of Parallel Systems (SMA 5509) (MIT)

Description

6.895 covers theoretical foundations of general-purpose parallel computing systems, from languages to architecture. The focus is on the algorithmic underpinnings of parallel systems. The topics for the class will vary depending on student interest, but will likely include multithreading, synchronization, race detection, load balancing, memory consistency, routing networks, message-routing algorithms, and VLSI layout theory. The class will emphasize randomized algorithms and probabilistic analysis, including high-probability arguments. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5509 (Theory of Parallel Systems). 6.895 covers theoretical foundations of general-purpose parallel computing systems, from languages to architecture. The focus is on the algorithmic underpinnings of parallel systems. The topics for the class will vary depending on student interest, but will likely include multithreading, synchronization, race detection, load balancing, memory consistency, routing networks, message-routing algorithms, and VLSI layout theory. The class will emphasize randomized algorithms and probabilistic analysis, including high-probability arguments. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5509 (Theory of Parallel Systems).

Subjects

parallel systems | parallel systems | parallel computing | parallel computing | algorithms | algorithms | multithreading | multithreading | synchronization | synchronization | race detection | race detection | load balancing | load balancing | memory consistency | memory consistency | routing networks | routing networks | message-routing algorithms | message-routing algorithms | VLSI layout theory | VLSI layout theory | randomized algorithms | randomized algorithms | probabilistic analysis | probabilistic analysis | high-probability arguments | high-probability arguments

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.432 Stochastic Processes, Detection, and Estimation (MIT) 6.432 Stochastic Processes, Detection, and Estimation (MIT)

Description

This course examines the fundamentals of detection and estimation for signal processing, communications, and control. Topics covered include: vector spaces of random variables; Bayesian and Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing; Bayesian and nonrandom parameter estimation; minimum-variance unbiased estimators and the Cramer-Rao bounds; representations for stochastic processes, shaping and whitening filters, and Karhunen-Loeve expansions; and detection and estimation from waveform observations. Advanced topics include: linear prediction and spectral estimation, and Wiener and Kalman filters. This course examines the fundamentals of detection and estimation for signal processing, communications, and control. Topics covered include: vector spaces of random variables; Bayesian and Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing; Bayesian and nonrandom parameter estimation; minimum-variance unbiased estimators and the Cramer-Rao bounds; representations for stochastic processes, shaping and whitening filters, and Karhunen-Loeve expansions; and detection and estimation from waveform observations. Advanced topics include: linear prediction and spectral estimation, and Wiener and Kalman filters.

Subjects

stochastic process | stochastic process | detection | detection | estimation | estimation | signal processing | signal processing | communications | communications | control | control | vector spaces | vector spaces | Bayesian | Bayesian | Neyman-Pearson | Neyman-Pearson | minimum-variance unbiased estimator | minimum-variance unbiased estimator | Cramer-Rao bounds | Cramer-Rao bounds | shaping filter | shaping filter | whitening filter | whitening filter | Karhunen-Loeve expansion | Karhunen-Loeve expansion | waveform observation | waveform observation | linear prediction | linear prediction | spectral estimation | spectral estimation | Wiener filter | Wiener filter | Kalman filter | Kalman filter

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.661 Receivers, Antennas, and Signals (MIT) 6.661 Receivers, Antennas, and Signals (MIT)

Description

This course explores the detection and measurement of radio and optical signals encountered in communications, astronomy, remote sensing, instrumentation, and radar. Topics covered include: statistical analysis of signal processing systems, including radiometers, spectrometers, interferometers, and digital correlation systems; matched filters and ambiguity functions; communications channel performance; measurement of random electromagnetic fields, angular filtering properties of antennas, interferometers, and aperture synthesis systems; and radiative transfer and parameter estimation. This course explores the detection and measurement of radio and optical signals encountered in communications, astronomy, remote sensing, instrumentation, and radar. Topics covered include: statistical analysis of signal processing systems, including radiometers, spectrometers, interferometers, and digital correlation systems; matched filters and ambiguity functions; communications channel performance; measurement of random electromagnetic fields, angular filtering properties of antennas, interferometers, and aperture synthesis systems; and radiative transfer and parameter estimation.

Subjects

receiver | receiver | antenna | antenna | signal | signal | radio | radio | optical | optical | detection | detection | communications | communications | astronomy | astronomy | remote sensing | instrumentation | remote sensing | instrumentation | radar | radar | statistics | statistics | signal processing | signal processing | radiometer | radiometer | spectrometer | spectrometer | interferometer | interferometer | digital correlation | digital correlation | matched filter | matched filter | ambiguity function | ambiguity function | channel performance | channel performance | electromagnetic | electromagnetic | angular filtering | angular filtering | aperture synthesis | aperture synthesis | radiative transfer | radiative transfer | parameter estimation | parameter estimation | remote sensing | remote sensing | instrumentation | instrumentation | radio signals | radio signals | optical signals | optical signals | statistical analysis | statistical analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT) 6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT)

Description

6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this 6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this

Subjects

optical | optical | optical signals | optical signals | optical devices | optical devices | transmission | transmission | detection | detection | storage | storage | processing | processing | display | display | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | diffraction | diffraction | holography | holography | lasers | lasers | LEDs | LEDs | spatial light modulation | spatial light modulation | display technologies | display technologies | optical waveguides | optical waveguides | fiberoptic communication | fiberoptic communication | thermal photodetector | thermal photodetector | quantum photodetector | quantum photodetector | optical storage media | optical storage media | disks | disks | 3-D holographic material | 3-D holographic material | coherent optical processor | coherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | Fourier optics | Fourier optics | acousto-optics | acousto-optics | optoelectronic neural networks | optoelectronic neural networks | optical interconnection device technologies | optical interconnection device technologies | image processing | image processing | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | radar systems | radar systems | adaptive optical systems | adaptive optical systems | 6.161 | 6.161

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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