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11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT) 11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries, mainly through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are:the nature of poverty and targeting,the political-economy and politics of poverty-reducing initiatives,implementation experiences,employment and local economic development, particularly as related to small and medium enterprises and the informal sector,cooperatives and other forms of collective action for income generation, anddecentralization, civil society, and non-government organizations. This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries, mainly through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are:the nature of poverty and targeting,the political-economy and politics of poverty-reducing initiatives,implementation experiences,employment and local economic development, particularly as related to small and medium enterprises and the informal sector,cooperatives and other forms of collective action for income generation, anddecentralization, civil society, and non-government organizations.

Subjects

public-sector policies | public-sector policies | programs | programs | enhancing the economic activities of poorer groups | enhancing the economic activities of poorer groups | micro-regions | developing countries | micro-regions | developing countries | local economic development | local economic development | small enterprises | small enterprises | collective action | collective action | labor and worker associations | labor and worker associations | nongovernment organizations | nongovernment organizations | literature on poverty | economic development | literature on poverty | economic development | reform of government | reform of government | equitable outcomes | equitable outcomes | public-sector programs | public-sector programs | public-sector projects | public-sector projects | developing countries | developing countries | labor associations | labor associations | worker associations | worker associations | poverty | poverty | economic development | economic development | political reform | political reform | employment | employment | political-economy | political-economy | cooperatives | cooperatives | decentralization | decentralization | civil society | civil society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe. This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | Planning | Planning | water supply | water supply | sanitation | sanitation | developing countries | developing countries | sanitation technologies | sanitation technologies | service pricing | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | alternative institutional structures | privatization | privatization | consumer demand | consumer demand | community participation | community participation | planning processes | planning processes | environmental health | environmental health | public health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | low-income households | case studies | case studies | policy memos | policy memos | journals | journals | environment | environment | sustainability | sustainability | pollution | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations. This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | developing--country governments | international | international | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | new--town development | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | developing countries | national planning | national planning | planners | planners | government institutions | government institutions | national government | national government | local government | local government | low-cost housing | low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | reform | reform | politics | politics | patronage | patronage | clientelism | clientelism | corruption | corruption | civil servants | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.73 The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT) 14.73 The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT)

Description

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor—or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poor? Should we leave economic development to This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor—or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poor? Should we leave economic development to

Subjects

developing countries | developing countries | child labor | child labor | randomized evaluations | randomized evaluations | poverty and economic growth | poverty and economic growth | microfinance | microfinance | World Bank and IMF | World Bank and IMF

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT) 11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and

Subjects

public sector | public sector | policies | policies | programs | programs | projects | projects | poverty | poverty | unemployment | unemployment | developing countries | developing countries | local economic development | local economic development | informal sector | informal sector | small enterprises | small enterprises | political economy | political economy | local economic development initiatives | local economic development initiatives | implementation | implementation | worker conditions | worker conditions | associations | associations | government reform | government reform | poverty reduction | poverty reduction | equitable outcomes | equitable outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | ESD.284J | ESD.284J | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284 | 11.418 | 11.418 | ESD.192 | ESD.192

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrial ized nations | industrial ized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.471 Targeting the Poor: Small Firms, Workers, and Local Economic Development (MIT) 11.471 Targeting the Poor: Small Firms, Workers, and Local Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries, mainly through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are:employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers;the political economy of local economic-development initiatives;lessons from policy and implementation experiences;workers and labor issues; andassociationalism among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries, mainly through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are:employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers;the political economy of local economic-development initiatives;lessons from policy and implementation experiences;workers and labor issues; andassociationalism among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers.

Subjects

public-sector policies | public-sector policies | programs | programs | enhancing the economic activities of poorer groups | enhancing the economic activities of poorer groups | micro-regions | micro-regions | developing countries | developing countries | local economic development | local economic development | small enterprises | small enterprises | collective action | collective action | labor and worker associations | labor and worker associations | nongovernment organizations | nongovernment organizations | literature on poverty | literature on poverty | economic development | economic development | reform of government | reform of government | equitable outcomes | equitable outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs; the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development; determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government; evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions; and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors. This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs; the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development; determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government; evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions; and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors.

Subjects

basic economic concerns | basic economic concerns | political | political | institutional | institutional | and cultural factors | and cultural factors | decentralization in national economic reform programs | decentralization in national economic reform programs | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | political | institutional | and cultural factors | political | institutional | and cultural factors | developing countries | developing countries | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | economic development | economic development | balance sheets | balance sheets | fiscal gap | fiscal gap | revenues | revenues | expenditures | expenditures | budget deficits | budget deficits | inflation | inflation | public finance theory | public finance theory | efficiency | efficiency | optimal taxation | optimal taxation | optimal user fees | optimal user fees | basic microeconomic theory | basic microeconomic theory | equity | equity | incidence | incidence | general equilibrium model | general equilibrium model | property taxation | property taxation | tax reform | tax reform | intergovernmental fiscal relations | intergovernmental fiscal relations | fiscal federalism | fiscal federalism | decentralization | decentralization | transfers | transfers | international lending agencies | international lending agencies | programming assistance | programming assistance | conditionalities | conditionalities | public debt | public debt | structural adjustment | structural adjustment | private sector participation | private sector participation | microfinance | microfinance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | nequality | nequality | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy | democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrialized nations | industrialized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business | aging | aging | population | population | countries | countries | developing | developing | development | development | industrial | industrial | industrialized | industrialized | nations | nations | politics | politics | political | political | theory | theory | sustainable | sustainable | public | public | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | economies | economies | transition | transition | growth | growth | institutions | institutions | institutional | institutional | trade | trade | international | international

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrial ized nations | industrial ized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | inequality; social safety nets | inequality; social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy. | democracy. | democracy | democracy | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.471 Targeting the Poor: Local Economic Development in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.471 Targeting the Poor: Local Economic Development in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to increase employment through development-promoting measures in the economic realm, through support and regulation. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and environments that are most conducive to equitable outcomes, and emphasizes throughout the understandings gained about why certain initiatives work and others don’t. This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to increase employment through development-promoting measures in the economic realm, through support and regulation. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and environments that are most conducive to equitable outcomes, and emphasizes throughout the understandings gained about why certain initiatives work and others don’t.

Subjects

local economic development | local economic development | poverty | poverty | developing countries | developing countries | public-sector policies | public-sector policies | employment | employment | labor standards | labor standards | environmental standards | environmental standards | political economy | political economy | poverty reduction | poverty reduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it evaluates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe. This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it evaluates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning | planning | water supply | water supply | sanitation | sanitation | developing countries | developing countries | sanitation technologies | sanitation technologies | service pricing | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | alternative institutional structures | privatization | privatization | consumer demand | consumer demand | community participation | community participation | planning processes | planning processes | environmental health | environmental health | public health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | low-income households | case studies | case studies | policy memos | policy memos | journals | journals | environment | environment | sustainability | sustainability | pollution | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs, the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development, determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government, evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions, and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors. This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs, the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development, determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government, evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions, and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors.

Subjects

basic economic concerns | basic economic concerns | political | political | institutional | institutional | and cultural factors | and cultural factors | decentralization in national economic reform programs | decentralization in national economic reform programs | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | political | institutional | and cultural factors | political | institutional | and cultural factors | developing countries | developing countries | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | economic development | economic development | balance sheets | balance sheets | fiscal gap | fiscal gap | revenues | revenues | expenditures | expenditures | budget deficits | budget deficits | inflation | inflation | public finance theory | public finance theory | efficiency | efficiency | optimal taxation | optimal taxation | optimal user fees | optimal user fees | basic microeconomic theory | basic microeconomic theory | equity | equity | incidence | incidence | general equilibrium model | general equilibrium model | property taxation | property taxation | tax reform | tax reform | intergovernmental fiscal relations | intergovernmental fiscal relations | fiscal federalism | fiscal federalism | decentralization | decentralization | transfers | transfers | international lending agencies | international lending agencies | programming assistance | programming assistance | conditionalities | conditionalities | public debt | public debt | structural adjustment | structural adjustment | private sector participation | private sector participation | microfinance | microfinance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.950J Biomedical Computing (MIT) HST.950J Biomedical Computing (MIT)

Description

Analyzes computational needs of clinical medicine reviews systems and approaches that have been used to support those needs, and the relationship between clinical data and gene and protein measurements. Topics: the nature of clinical data; architecture and design of healthcare information systems; privacy and security issues; medical expertsystems; introduction to bioinformatics. Case studies and guest lectures describe contemporary systems and research projects. Term project using large clinical and genomic data sets integrates classroom topics. Analyzes computational needs of clinical medicine reviews systems and approaches that have been used to support those needs, and the relationship between clinical data and gene and protein measurements. Topics: the nature of clinical data; architecture and design of healthcare information systems; privacy and security issues; medical expertsystems; introduction to bioinformatics. Case studies and guest lectures describe contemporary systems and research projects. Term project using large clinical and genomic data sets integrates classroom topics.

Subjects

HST.950 | HST.950 | medical informatics | medical informatics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | developing countries | developing countries | medical data | medical data | clinical data | clinical data | probabilistic models | probabilistic models | graphical models | graphical models | information theory | information theory | decision support | decision support | expert systems | expert systems | personal health records | personal health records | bayesian networks | bayesian networks | bayesian models | bayesian models | health information systems | health information systems | public health informatics | public health informatics | predictive genomics | predictive genomics | patient data privacy | patient data privacy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.939 Designing and Sustaining Technology Innovation for Global Health Practice (MIT) HST.939 Designing and Sustaining Technology Innovation for Global Health Practice (MIT)

Description

Innovation in global health practice requires leaders who are trained to think and act like entrepreneurs. Whether at a hospital bedside or in a remote village, global healthcare leaders must understand both the business of running a social venture as well as how to plan for and provide access to life saving medicines and essential health services. Each week, the course features a lecture and skills-based tutorial session led by industry, non-profit foundation, technology, and academic leaders to think outside the box in tackling and solving problems in innovation for global health practice through the rationale design of technology and service solutions. The lectures provide the foundation for faculty-mentored pilot project from MOH, students, or non-profit sponsors that may involve creat Innovation in global health practice requires leaders who are trained to think and act like entrepreneurs. Whether at a hospital bedside or in a remote village, global healthcare leaders must understand both the business of running a social venture as well as how to plan for and provide access to life saving medicines and essential health services. Each week, the course features a lecture and skills-based tutorial session led by industry, non-profit foundation, technology, and academic leaders to think outside the box in tackling and solving problems in innovation for global health practice through the rationale design of technology and service solutions. The lectures provide the foundation for faculty-mentored pilot project from MOH, students, or non-profit sponsors that may involve creat

Subjects

global health | global health | developing countries | developing countries | third world | third world | Africa | Africa | underserved population | underserved population | rural medicine | rural medicine | health technology | health technology | health ventures | health ventures | medical technology | medical technology | medical innovation | medical innovation | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | non-profit | non-profit | pharmaceutical design | pharmaceutical design | rapid diagnostic test | rapid diagnostic test | systems design | systems design | student projects | student projects | field work | field work | mentor program | mentor program | interdisciplinary | interdisciplinary | health economics | health economics | disease management | disease management | drug distribution | drug distribution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | inequality; social safety nets | inequality; social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy. | democracy. | democracy | democracy | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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