Searching for dimensional analysis : 29 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course introduces fundamental concepts in "continuous'' applied mathematics, with an emphasis on nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). Topics include linear and nonlinear waves: kinematic waves, method of characteristics, expansion fans, wave breaking, shock dynamics, shock structure; linear and nonlinear diffusion: Green functions, Fourier transform, similarity solutions, boundary layers, Nernst-Planck equations. Applications include traffic flow, gas dynamics, and granular flow. This course introduces fundamental concepts in "continuous'' applied mathematics, with an emphasis on nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). Topics include linear and nonlinear waves: kinematic waves, method of characteristics, expansion fans, wave breaking, shock dynamics, shock structure; linear and nonlinear diffusion: Green functions, Fourier transform, similarity solutions, boundary layers, Nernst-Planck equations. Applications include traffic flow, gas dynamics, and granular flow.

Subjects

Linear and nonlinear waves | Linear and nonlinear waves | hyperbolic waves | hyperbolic waves | kinematic waves | kinematic waves | expansion fans | expansion fans | shock dynamics | shock dynamics | shock structure | shock structure | Linear diffusion | Linear diffusion | nonlinear diffusion | nonlinear diffusion | Green functions | Green functions | Fourier transform | Fourier transform | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | similarity solutions | similarity solutions | boundary layers | boundary layers | traffic flow | traffic flow | gas dynamics | gas dynamics | tsunamis | tsunamis | heat transfer | heat transfer | ion transport | ion transport | granular flow | granular flow

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. Boundary layers and separation. Circulation and vorticity theorems. Potential flow. Introduction to turbulence. Lift and drag. Surface tension and surface tension driven flows. Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. Boundary layers and separation. Circulation and vorticity theorems. Potential flow. Introduction to turbulence. Lift and drag. Surface tension and surface tension driven flows.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | | fluid dynamics | | Mass conservation | | Mass conservation | | Navier-Stokes equation | | Navier-Stokes equation | | viscous flows | | viscous flows | | dimensional analysis | | dimensional analysis | | Lubrication theory | | Lubrication theory | | Boundary layers | | Boundary layers | | vorticity theorems | | vorticity theorems | | Potential flow | | Potential flow | | turbulence | turbulence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.050 Engineering Mechanics I (MIT) 1.050 Engineering Mechanics I (MIT)

Description

This subject provides an introduction to the mechanics of materials and structures. You will be introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of materials and structures and you will learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there will be a chance for you to put your mathematical skills obtained in 18.01, 18.02, and eventually 18.03 to use in this subject, the emphasis is on the physical understanding of why a material or structure behaves the way it does in the engineering design of materials and structures. This subject provides an introduction to the mechanics of materials and structures. You will be introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of materials and structures and you will learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there will be a chance for you to put your mathematical skills obtained in 18.01, 18.02, and eventually 18.03 to use in this subject, the emphasis is on the physical understanding of why a material or structure behaves the way it does in the engineering design of materials and structures.

Subjects

mechanics | mechanics | materials | materials | structures | structures | engineering design | engineering design | Galileo's problem | Galileo's problem | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | atomic explosion | atomic explosion | World Trade Center towers | World Trade Center towers | stress | stress | continuum model | continuum model | beam model | beam model | strength models | strength models | strength criteria | strength criteria | stress plane | stress plane | deformation | deformation | strain tensor | strain tensor | Mohr circle | Mohr circle | elasticity | elasticity | energy bounds | energy bounds | fracture mechanics | fracture mechanics | collapse | collapse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance. This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | boundary layer | lift | lift | drag | drag | vorticity theorems | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | Potential flow | turbulence | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | potenial flow | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | flight | flight | surface tension | surface tension

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.20 Marine Hydrodynamics (13.021) (MIT) 2.20 Marine Hydrodynamics (13.021) (MIT)

Description

In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. The various topics covered are: Transport theorem and conservation principles, Navier-Stokes' equation, dimensional analysis, ideal and potential flows, vorticity and Kelvin's theorem, hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory, viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, model testing, scaling laws, application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces, linearized theory of lifting surfaces, and experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.021. In 2005, In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. The various topics covered are: Transport theorem and conservation principles, Navier-Stokes' equation, dimensional analysis, ideal and potential flows, vorticity and Kelvin's theorem, hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory, viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, model testing, scaling laws, application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces, linearized theory of lifting surfaces, and experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.021. In 2005,

Subjects

fundamentals of fluid mechanics | fundamentals of fluid mechanics | naval architecture | naval architecture | ocean science and engineering | ocean science and engineering | transport theorem | transport theorem | conservation principles | conservation principles | Navier-Stokes' equation | Navier-Stokes' equation | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | ideal and potential flows | ideal and potential flows | vorticity and Kelvin's theorem | vorticity and Kelvin's theorem | hydrodynamic forces in potential flow | hydrodynamic forces in potential flow | D'Alembert's paradox | D'Alembert's paradox | added-mass | added-mass | slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow | slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow | laminar and turbulent boundary layers | laminar and turbulent boundary layers | model testing | model testing | scaling laws | scaling laws | application of potential theory to surface waves | application of potential theory to surface waves | energy transport | energy transport | wave/body forces | wave/body forces | linearized theory of lifting surfaces | linearized theory of lifting surfaces | experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel | experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT) 6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world. This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world.

Subjects

approximation | approximation | science | science | engineering | engineering | managing complexity | managing complexity | divide and conquer | divide and conquer | heterogeneous hierarchies | heterogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | proportional reasoning | proportional reasoning | conservation/box models | conservation/box models | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | special cases | special cases | extreme cases | extreme cases | discretization | discretization | spring models | spring models | symmetry | symmetry | invariance | invariance | discarding information | discarding information | oil imports | oil imports | tree representations | tree representations | gold | gold | random walks | random walks | UNIX | UNIX | triangle bisection | triangle bisection | pentagonal heat flow | pentagonal heat flow | jump heights | jump heights | simple calculus | simple calculus | drag | drag | cycling | cycling | swimming | swimming | flying | flying | flight | flight | algebraic symmetry | algebraic symmetry | densities | densities | hydrogen size | hydrogen size | bending of light | bending of light | Buckingham Pi Theorem | Buckingham Pi Theorem | pulley acceleration | pulley acceleration | waves | waves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

16.13 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (MIT) 16.13 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (MIT)

Description

The major focus of 16.13 is on boundary layers, and boundary layer theory subject to various flow assumptions, such as compressibility, turbulence, dimensionality, and heat transfer. Parameters influencing aerodynamic flows and transition and influence of boundary layers on outer potential flow are presented, along with associated stall and drag mechanisms. Numerical solution techniques and exercises are included. The major focus of 16.13 is on boundary layers, and boundary layer theory subject to various flow assumptions, such as compressibility, turbulence, dimensionality, and heat transfer. Parameters influencing aerodynamic flows and transition and influence of boundary layers on outer potential flow are presented, along with associated stall and drag mechanisms. Numerical solution techniques and exercises are included.

Subjects

aerodynamics | aerodynamics | viscous fluids | viscous fluids | viscosity | viscosity | fundamental theorem of kinematics | fundamental theorem of kinematics | convection | convection | vorticity | vorticity | strain | strain | Eulerian description | Eulerian description | Lagrangian description | Lagrangian description | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | continuity | continuity | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | stress tensor | stress tensor | newtonian fluid | newtonian fluid | circulation | circulation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | similarity | similarity | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | thin shear later approximation | thin shear later approximation | TSL coordinates | TSL coordinates | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | shear later categories | shear later categories | local scaling | local scaling | Falkner-Skan flows | Falkner-Skan flows | solution techniques | solution techniques | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Newton-Raphson | Newton-Raphson | integral momentum equation | integral momentum equation | Thwaites method | Thwaites method | integral kinetic energy equation | integral kinetic energy equation | dissipation | dissipation | asymptotic perturbation | asymptotic perturbation | displacement body | displacement body | transpiration | transpiration | form drag | form drag | stall | stall | interacting boundary layer theory | interacting boundary layer theory | stability | stability | transition | transition | small-perturbation | small-perturbation | Orr-Somemerfeld | Orr-Somemerfeld | temporal amplification | temporal amplification | spatial amplification | spatial amplification | Reynolds | Reynolds | Prandtl | Prandtl | turbulent boundary layer | turbulent boundary layer | wake | wake | wall layers | wall layers | inner variables | inner variables | outer variables | outer variables | roughness | roughness | Clauser | Clauser | Dissipation formula | Dissipation formula | integral closer | integral closer | turbulence modeling | turbulence modeling | transport models | transport models | turbulent shear layers | turbulent shear layers | compressible then shear layers | compressible then shear layers | compressibility | compressibility | temperature profile | temperature profile | heat flux | heat flux | 3D boundary layers | 3D boundary layers | crossflow | crossflow | lateral dilation | lateral dilation | 3D separation | 3D separation | constant-crossflow | constant-crossflow | 3D transition | 3D transition | compressible thin shear layers | compressible thin shear layers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is about mathematical analysis of continuum models of various natural phenomena. Such models are generally described by partial differential equations (PDE) and for this reason much of the course is devoted to the analysis of PDE. Examples of applications come from physics, chemistry, biology, complex systems: traffic flows, shock waves, hydraulic jumps, bio-fluid flows, chemical reactions, diffusion, heat transfer, population dynamics, and pattern formation. This course is about mathematical analysis of continuum models of various natural phenomena. Such models are generally described by partial differential equations (PDE) and for this reason much of the course is devoted to the analysis of PDE. Examples of applications come from physics, chemistry, biology, complex systems: traffic flows, shock waves, hydraulic jumps, bio-fluid flows, chemical reactions, diffusion, heat transfer, population dynamics, and pattern formation.

Subjects

partial differential equation | partial differential equation | hyperbolic equations | hyperbolic equations | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | perturbation methods | perturbation methods | hyperbolic systems | hyperbolic systems | diffusion and reaction processes | diffusion and reaction processes | continuum models | continuum models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-18.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.098 Street-Fighting Mathematics (MIT) 18.098 Street-Fighting Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course teaches the art of guessing results and solving problems without doing a proof or an exact calculation. Techniques include extreme-cases reasoning, dimensional analysis, successive approximation, discretization, generalization, and pictorial analysis. Applications include mental calculation, solid geometry, musical intervals, logarithms, integration, infinite series, solitaire, and differential equations. (No epsilons or deltas are harmed by taking this course.) This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course teaches the art of guessing results and solving problems without doing a proof or an exact calculation. Techniques include extreme-cases reasoning, dimensional analysis, successive approximation, discretization, generalization, and pictorial analysis. Applications include mental calculation, solid geometry, musical intervals, logarithms, integration, infinite series, solitaire, and differential equations. (No epsilons or deltas are harmed by taking this course.) This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

extreme-cases reasoning | extreme-cases reasoning | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | discretization | discretization | drag | drag | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | pendulum | pendulum | pictorial proofs | pictorial proofs | analogy | analogy | operators | operators | summation | summation | square roots | square roots | logarithms | logarithms | musical intervals | musical intervals | taking out the big part | taking out the big part | integration | integration | differentiation | differentiation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.750 Modeling Issues in Speech and Hearing (MIT) HST.750 Modeling Issues in Speech and Hearing (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theory and practice of scientific modeling in the context of auditory and speech biophysics. Based on seminar-style discussions of the research literature, the class draws on examples from hearing and speech, and explores general, meta-theoretical issues that transcend the particular subject matter. Examples include: What is a model? What is the process of model building? What are the different approaches to modeling? What is the relationship between theory and experiment? How are models tested? What constitutes a good model? This course explores the theory and practice of scientific modeling in the context of auditory and speech biophysics. Based on seminar-style discussions of the research literature, the class draws on examples from hearing and speech, and explores general, meta-theoretical issues that transcend the particular subject matter. Examples include: What is a model? What is the process of model building? What are the different approaches to modeling? What is the relationship between theory and experiment? How are models tested? What constitutes a good model?

Subjects

hearing | hearing | speech | speech | modeling biology | modeling biology | network model of the ear | network model of the ear | model building | model building | dimensional analysis and scaling | dimensional analysis and scaling | resampling | resampling | monte carlo | monte carlo | forward vs. inverse | forward vs. inverse | chaos | chaos | limits of prediction | limits of prediction | hodgkin | hodgkin | huxley | huxley | molecular mathematic biology | molecular mathematic biology | cochlear input impedance | cochlear input impedance | auditory network | auditory network | auditory morphology | auditory morphology | electric model of neural cell fiber | electric model of neural cell fiber | electric diagrams of neural cells | electric diagrams of neural cells | linear regression | linear regression | sensitivity analysis | sensitivity analysis | cochlea | cochlea | inner ear | inner ear | middle ear | middle ear | auditory cortex | auditory cortex | scientific literature | scientific literature | analysis | analysis | paper analysis | paper analysis | tent maps | tent maps | quadratic maps | quadratic maps

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-HST.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua; Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows; similarity and dimensional analysis; lubrication theory; boundary layers and separation; circulation and vorticity theorems; potential flow; introduction to turbulence; lift and drag; surface tension and surface tension driven flows. This course is a survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua; Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows; similarity and dimensional analysis; lubrication theory; boundary layers and separation; circulation and vorticity theorems; potential flow; introduction to turbulence; lift and drag; surface tension and surface tension driven flows.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | boundary layer | lift | lift | drag | drag | vorticity theorems | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | Potential flow | turbulence | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | potenial flow | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | flight | flight | surface tension | surface tension

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

18.311 Principles of Continuum Applied Mathematics covers fundamental concepts in continuous applied mathematics, including applications from traffic flow, fluids, elasticity, granular flows, etc. The class also covers continuum limit; conservation laws, quasi-equilibrium; kinematic waves; characteristics, simple waves, shocks; diffusion (linear and nonlinear); numerical solution of wave equations; finite differences, consistency, stability; discrete and fast Fourier transforms; spectral methods; transforms and series (Fourier, Laplace). Additional topics may include sonic booms, Mach cone, caustics, lattices, dispersion, and group velocity. 18.311 Principles of Continuum Applied Mathematics covers fundamental concepts in continuous applied mathematics, including applications from traffic flow, fluids, elasticity, granular flows, etc. The class also covers continuum limit; conservation laws, quasi-equilibrium; kinematic waves; characteristics, simple waves, shocks; diffusion (linear and nonlinear); numerical solution of wave equations; finite differences, consistency, stability; discrete and fast Fourier transforms; spectral methods; transforms and series (Fourier, Laplace). Additional topics may include sonic booms, Mach cone, caustics, lattices, dispersion, and group velocity.

Subjects

partial differential equation | partial differential equation | hyperbolic equations | hyperbolic equations | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | perturbation methods | perturbation methods | hyperbolic systems | hyperbolic systems | diffusion and reaction processes | diffusion and reaction processes | continuum models | continuum models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | continuous applied mathematics | continuous applied mathematics | traffic flow | traffic flow | fluids | fluids | elasticity | elasticity | granular flows | granular flows | continuum limit | continuum limit | conservation laws | conservation laws | quasi-equilibrium | quasi-equilibrium | kinematic waves | kinematic waves | characteristics | characteristics | simple waves | simple waves | shocks | shocks | diffusion (linear and nonlinear) | diffusion (linear and nonlinear) | numerical solution of wave equations | numerical solution of wave equations | finite differences | finite differences | consistency | consistency | stability | stability | discrete and fast Fourier transforms | discrete and fast Fourier transforms | spectral methods | spectral methods | transforms and series (Fourier | Laplace) | transforms and series (Fourier | Laplace) | sonic booms | sonic booms | Mach cone | Mach cone | caustics | caustics | lattices | lattices | dispersion | dispersion | group velocity | group velocity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance. This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | boundary layer | lift | lift | drag | drag | vorticity theorems | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | Potential flow | turbulence | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | potenial flow | inviscid flow | inviscid flow | flight | flight | surface tension | surface tension

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is about mathematical analysis of continuum models of various natural phenomena. Such models are generally described by partial differential equations (PDE) and for this reason much of the course is devoted to the analysis of PDE. Examples of applications come from physics, chemistry, biology, complex systems: traffic flows, shock waves, hydraulic jumps, bio-fluid flows, chemical reactions, diffusion, heat transfer, population dynamics, and pattern formation. This course is about mathematical analysis of continuum models of various natural phenomena. Such models are generally described by partial differential equations (PDE) and for this reason much of the course is devoted to the analysis of PDE. Examples of applications come from physics, chemistry, biology, complex systems: traffic flows, shock waves, hydraulic jumps, bio-fluid flows, chemical reactions, diffusion, heat transfer, population dynamics, and pattern formation.

Subjects

partial differential equation | partial differential equation | hyperbolic equations | hyperbolic equations | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | perturbation methods | perturbation methods | hyperbolic systems | hyperbolic systems | diffusion and reaction processes | diffusion and reaction processes | continuum models | continuum models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT)

Description

8.01 is a first-semester freshman physics class in Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory. In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Resonance Phenomena, Musical Instruments, Stellar Collapse, Supernovae, Astronomical observations from very high flying balloons (lecture 35), and you will be allowed a peek into the intriguing Quantum World. Also by Walter Lewin Courses: Electricity and Magnetism (8.02) - with a complete set of 36 video lectures from the Spring of 2002 Vibrations and Waves (8.03) - with a complete set of 23 video lectures from the Fall of 2004 Talks: For The Love Of Physics - Profes

Subjects

units of measurement | powers of ten | dimensional analysis | measurement uncertainty | scaling arguments | velocity | speed | acceleration | acceleration of gravity | vectors | motion | vector product | scalar product | projectiles | projectile trajectory | circular motion | centripetal motion | artifical gravity | force | Newton's Three Laws | eight | weightlessness | tension | friction | frictionless forces | static friction | dot products | cross products | kinematics | springs | pendulum | mechanical energy | kinetic energy | universal gravitation | resistive force | drag force | air drag | viscous terminal velocity | potential energy | heat; energy consumption | heat | energy consumption | collisions | center of mass | momentum | Newton's Cradle | impulse and impact | rocket thrust | rocket velocity | flywheels | inertia | torque | spinning rod | elliptical orbits | Kepler's Laws | Doppler shift | stellar dynamics | sound waves | electromagnets | binary star | black holes | rope tension | elasticity | speed of sound | pressure in fluid | Pascal's Principle | hydrostatic pressure | barometric pressure | submarines | buoyant force | Bernoulli's Equations | Archimede's Principle | floating | baloons | resonance | wind instruments | thermal expansion | shrink fitting | particles and waves | diffraction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT)

Description

8.01 is a first-semester freshman physics class in Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory. In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Resonance Phenomena, Musical Instruments, Stellar Collapse, Supernovae, Astronomical observations from very high flying balloons (lecture 35), and you will be allowed a peek into the intriguing Quantum World. Also by Walter Lewin Courses: Electricity and Magnetism (8.02) - with a complete set of 36 video lectures from the Spring of 2002 Vibrations and Waves (8.03) - with a complete set of 23 video lectures from the Fall of 2004 Talks: For The Love Of Physics - Profes

Subjects

units of measurement | powers of ten | dimensional analysis | measurement uncertainty | scaling arguments | velocity | speed | acceleration | acceleration of gravity | vectors | motion | vector product | scalar product | projectiles | projectile trajectory | circular motion | centripetal motion | artifical gravity | force | Newton's Three Laws | eight | weightlessness | tension | friction | frictionless forces | static friction | dot products | cross products | kinematics | springs | pendulum | mechanical energy | kinetic energy | universal gravitation | resistive force | drag force | air drag | viscous terminal velocity | potential energy | heat; energy consumption | heat | energy consumption | collisions | center of mass | momentum | Newton's Cradle | impulse and impact | rocket thrust | rocket velocity | flywheels | inertia | torque | spinning rod | elliptical orbits | Kepler's Laws | Doppler shift | stellar dynamics | sound waves | electromagnets | binary star | black holes | rope tension | elasticity | speed of sound | pressure in fluid | Pascal's Principle | hydrostatic pressure | barometric pressure | submarines | buoyant force | Bernoulli's Equations | Archimede's Principle | floating | baloons | resonance | wind instruments | thermal expansion | shrink fitting | particles and waves | diffraction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allkoreancourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Fluid Mechanics

Description

This course introduces fluid mechanics, the study of how and why fluids (both gaseous and liquid) behave the way they do. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Mechanical Engineering 201)

Subjects

fluid mechanics | fluid statics | dynamics | kinematics | bernoulli | velocity | acceleration | energy | differential analysis | dimensional analysis | hagen–poiseuille | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | lift | drag | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | inviscid flow | flight | surface tension

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is about mathematical analysis of continuum models of various natural phenomena. Such models are generally described by partial differential equations (PDE) and for this reason much of the course is devoted to the analysis of PDE. Examples of applications come from physics, chemistry, biology, complex systems: traffic flows, shock waves, hydraulic jumps, bio-fluid flows, chemical reactions, diffusion, heat transfer, population dynamics, and pattern formation.

Subjects

partial differential equation | hyperbolic equations | dimensional analysis | perturbation methods | hyperbolic systems | diffusion and reaction processes | continuum models | equilibrium models

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course introduces fundamental concepts in "continuous'' applied mathematics, with an emphasis on nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). Topics include linear and nonlinear waves: kinematic waves, method of characteristics, expansion fans, wave breaking, shock dynamics, shock structure; linear and nonlinear diffusion: Green functions, Fourier transform, similarity solutions, boundary layers, Nernst-Planck equations. Applications include traffic flow, gas dynamics, and granular flow.

Subjects

Linear and nonlinear waves | hyperbolic waves | kinematic waves | expansion fans | shock dynamics | shock structure | Linear diffusion | nonlinear diffusion | Green functions | Fourier transform | dimensional analysis | similarity solutions | boundary layers | traffic flow | gas dynamics | tsunamis | heat transfer | ion transport | granular flow

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. Boundary layers and separation. Circulation and vorticity theorems. Potential flow. Introduction to turbulence. Lift and drag. Surface tension and surface tension driven flows.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | | Mass conservation | | Navier-Stokes equation | | viscous flows | | dimensional analysis | | Lubrication theory | | Boundary layers | | vorticity theorems | | Potential flow | | turbulence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.050 Engineering Mechanics I (MIT)

Description

This subject provides an introduction to the mechanics of materials and structures. You will be introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of materials and structures and you will learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there will be a chance for you to put your mathematical skills obtained in 18.01, 18.02, and eventually 18.03 to use in this subject, the emphasis is on the physical understanding of why a material or structure behaves the way it does in the engineering design of materials and structures.

Subjects

mechanics | materials | structures | engineering design | Galileo's problem | dimensional analysis | atomic explosion | World Trade Center towers | stress | continuum model | beam model | strength models | strength criteria | stress plane | deformation | strain tensor | Mohr circle | elasticity | energy bounds | fracture mechanics | collapse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua; Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows; similarity and dimensional analysis; lubrication theory; boundary layers and separation; circulation and vorticity theorems; potential flow; introduction to turbulence; lift and drag; surface tension and surface tension driven flows.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | Mass conservation | Navier-Stokes equation | viscous flows | dimensional analysis | Lubrication theory | boundary layer | lift | drag | vorticity theorems | Potential flow | turbulence | Bernoulli equation | potenial flow | inviscid flow | flight | surface tension

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.20 Marine Hydrodynamics (13.021) (MIT)

Description

In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. The various topics covered are: Transport theorem and conservation principles, Navier-Stokes' equation, dimensional analysis, ideal and potential flows, vorticity and Kelvin's theorem, hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory, viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, model testing, scaling laws, application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces, linearized theory of lifting surfaces, and experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.021. In 2005,

Subjects

fundamentals of fluid mechanics | naval architecture | ocean science and engineering | transport theorem | conservation principles | Navier-Stokes' equation | dimensional analysis | ideal and potential flows | vorticity and Kelvin's theorem | hydrodynamic forces in potential flow | D'Alembert's paradox | added-mass | slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow | laminar and turbulent boundary layers | model testing | scaling laws | application of potential theory to surface waves | energy transport | wave/body forces | linearized theory of lifting surfaces | experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

16.13 Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (MIT)

Description

The major focus of 16.13 is on boundary layers, and boundary layer theory subject to various flow assumptions, such as compressibility, turbulence, dimensionality, and heat transfer. Parameters influencing aerodynamic flows and transition and influence of boundary layers on outer potential flow are presented, along with associated stall and drag mechanisms. Numerical solution techniques and exercises are included.

Subjects

aerodynamics | viscous fluids | viscosity | fundamental theorem of kinematics | convection | vorticity | strain | Eulerian description | Lagrangian description | conservation of mass | continuity | conservation of momentum | stress tensor | newtonian fluid | circulation | Navier-Stokes | similarity | dimensional analysis | thin shear later approximation | TSL coordinates | boundary conditions | shear later categories | local scaling | Falkner-Skan flows | solution techniques | finite difference methods | Newton-Raphson | integral momentum equation | Thwaites method | integral kinetic energy equation | dissipation | asymptotic perturbation | displacement body | transpiration | form drag | stall | interacting boundary layer theory | stability | transition | small-perturbation | Orr-Somemerfeld | temporal amplification | spatial amplification | Reynolds | Prandtl | turbulent boundary layer | wake | wall layers | inner variables | outer variables | roughness | Clauser | Dissipation formula | integral closer | turbulence modeling | transport models | turbulent shear layers | compressible then shear layers | compressibility | temperature profile | heat flux | 3D boundary layers | crossflow | lateral dilation | 3D separation | constant-crossflow | 3D transition | compressible thin shear layers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata