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12.950 Atmospheric and Oceanic Modeling (MIT) 12.950 Atmospheric and Oceanic Modeling (MIT)

Description

The numerical methods, formulation and parameterizations used in models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean will be described in detail. Widely used numerical methods will be the focus but we will also review emerging concepts and new methods. The numerics underlying a hierarchy of models will be discussed, ranging from simple GFD models to the high-end GCMs. In the context of ocean GCMs, we will describe parameterization of geostrophic eddies, mixing and the surface and bottom boundary layers. In the atmosphere, we will review parameterizations of convection and large scale condensation, the planetary boundary layer and radiative transfer. The numerical methods, formulation and parameterizations used in models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean will be described in detail. Widely used numerical methods will be the focus but we will also review emerging concepts and new methods. The numerics underlying a hierarchy of models will be discussed, ranging from simple GFD models to the high-end GCMs. In the context of ocean GCMs, we will describe parameterization of geostrophic eddies, mixing and the surface and bottom boundary layers. In the atmosphere, we will review parameterizations of convection and large scale condensation, the planetary boundary layer and radiative transfer.

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | formulation | formulation | parameterizations | parameterizations | models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean | models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean | numerics underlying a hierarchy of models | numerics underlying a hierarchy of models | simple GFD models | simple GFD models | high-end GCMs | high-end GCMs | ocean GCMs | ocean GCMs | parameterization of geostrophic eddies | parameterization of geostrophic eddies | mixing | mixing | surface and bottom boundary layers | surface and bottom boundary layers | atmosphere | atmosphere | parameterizations of convection | parameterizations of convection | large scale condensation | large scale condensation | planetary boundary layer | planetary boundary layer | radiative transfer | radiative transfer | finite difference method | finite difference method | Spatial discretization | Spatial discretization | numerical dispersion | numerical dispersion | Series expansion | Series expansion | Time-stepping | Time-stepping | Space-time discretization | Space-time discretization | Shallow water dynamics | Shallow water dynamics | Barotropic models | Barotropic models | Quasi-geostrophic equations | Quasi-geostrophic equations | Quasi-geostrophic models | Quasi-geostrophic models | Eddy parameterization | Eddy parameterization | Vertical coordinates | Vertical coordinates | primitive equations | primitive equations | Boundary layer parameterizations | Boundary layer parameterizations

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT) 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m and .mat files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m and .mat files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

numerical integration | numerical integration | ODEs | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | finite element | finite element | discretization | discretization | PDEs | PDEs | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | probabilistic methods | optimization | optimization | omputational methods | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | aerospace engineering | computational methods | computational methods

License

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13.472J Computational Geometry (MIT) 13.472J Computational Geometry (MIT)

Description

Topics in surface modeling: b-splines, non-uniform rational b-splines, physically based deformable surfaces, sweeps and generalized cylinders, offsets, blending and filleting surfaces. Non-linear solvers and intersection problems. Solid modeling: constructive solid geometry, boundary representation, non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models, octrees. Robustness of geometric computations. Interval methods. Finite and boundary element discretization methods for continuum mechanics problems. Scientific visualization. Variational geometry. Tolerances. Inspection methods. Feature representation and recognition. Shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing. Involves analytical and programming assignments. Topics in surface modeling: b-splines, non-uniform rational b-splines, physically based deformable surfaces, sweeps and generalized cylinders, offsets, blending and filleting surfaces. Non-linear solvers and intersection problems. Solid modeling: constructive solid geometry, boundary representation, non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models, octrees. Robustness of geometric computations. Interval methods. Finite and boundary element discretization methods for continuum mechanics problems. Scientific visualization. Variational geometry. Tolerances. Inspection methods. Feature representation and recognition. Shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing. Involves analytical and programming assignments.

Subjects

surface modeling | surface modeling | b-splines | b-splines | deformable surfaces | deformable surfaces | generalized cylinders | generalized cylinders | offsets | offsets | filleting surfaces | filleting surfaces | Non-linear solvers and intersection problems | Non-linear solvers and intersection problems | Solid modeling | Solid modeling | boundary representation | boundary representation | non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models | non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models | octrees | octrees | Interval methods | Interval methods | discretization methods | discretization methods | Scientific visualization | Scientific visualization | Variational geometry | Variational geometry | Tolerances | Tolerances | Inspection methods | Inspection methods | Shape interrogation | Shape interrogation | 2.158J | 2.158J | 1.128J | 1.128J | 16.940J | 16.940J | 13.472 | 13.472 | 2.158 | 2.158 | 1.128 | 1.128 | 16.940 | 16.940

License

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4.105 Geometric Disciplines and Architecture Skills: Reciprocal Methodologies (MIT) 4.105 Geometric Disciplines and Architecture Skills: Reciprocal Methodologies (MIT)

Description

This course is an intensive introduction to architectural design tools and process, and is taught through a series of short exercises. The conceptual basis of each exercise is in the interrogation of the geometric principles that lie at the core of each skill. Skills covered in this course range from techniques of hand drafting, to generation of 3D computer models, physical model-building, sketching, and diagramming. Weekly lectures and pin-ups address the conventions associated with modes of architectural representation and their capacity to convey ideas. This course is tailored and offered only to first-year M.Arch students. This course is an intensive introduction to architectural design tools and process, and is taught through a series of short exercises. The conceptual basis of each exercise is in the interrogation of the geometric principles that lie at the core of each skill. Skills covered in this course range from techniques of hand drafting, to generation of 3D computer models, physical model-building, sketching, and diagramming. Weekly lectures and pin-ups address the conventions associated with modes of architectural representation and their capacity to convey ideas. This course is tailored and offered only to first-year M.Arch students.

Subjects

geometry | geometry | representation | representation | architecture | architecture | drawing | drawing | projection | projection | perspective | perspective | planes | planes | axonometric | axonometric | stereotomy | stereotomy | volume | volume | surface | surface | curvature | curvature | curves | curves | discretization | discretization | generation | generation | construction | construction | publication | publication | presentation | presentation

License

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2.158J Computational Geometry (MIT) 2.158J Computational Geometry (MIT)

Description

Topics in surface modeling: b-splines, non-uniform rational b-splines, physically based deformable surfaces, sweeps and generalized cylinders, offsets, blending and filleting surfaces. Non-linear solvers and intersection problems. Solid modeling: constructive solid geometry, boundary representation, non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models, octrees. Robustness of geometric computations. Interval methods. Finite and boundary element discretization methods for continuum mechanics problems. Scientific visualization. Variational geometry. Tolerances. Inspection methods. Feature representation and recognition. Shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing. Involves analytical and programming assignments. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Depar Topics in surface modeling: b-splines, non-uniform rational b-splines, physically based deformable surfaces, sweeps and generalized cylinders, offsets, blending and filleting surfaces. Non-linear solvers and intersection problems. Solid modeling: constructive solid geometry, boundary representation, non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models, octrees. Robustness of geometric computations. Interval methods. Finite and boundary element discretization methods for continuum mechanics problems. Scientific visualization. Variational geometry. Tolerances. Inspection methods. Feature representation and recognition. Shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing. Involves analytical and programming assignments. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Depar

Subjects

surface modeling | surface modeling | b-splines | b-splines | deformable surfaces | deformable surfaces | generalized cylinders | generalized cylinders | offsets | offsets | filleting surfaces | filleting surfaces | Non-linear solvers and intersection problems | Non-linear solvers and intersection problems | Solid modeling | Solid modeling | boundary representation | boundary representation | non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models | non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models | octrees | octrees | Interval methods | Interval methods | discretization methods | discretization methods | Scientific visualization | Scientific visualization | Variational geometry | Variational geometry | Tolerances | Tolerances | Inspection methods | Inspection methods | Shape interrogation | Shape interrogation | 13.472J | 13.472J | 13.472 | 13.472 | 2.158 | 2.158 | 1.128 | 1.128 | 16.940 | 16.940

License

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6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT) 6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world. This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world.

Subjects

approximation | approximation | science | science | engineering | engineering | managing complexity | managing complexity | divide and conquer | divide and conquer | heterogeneous hierarchies | heterogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | proportional reasoning | proportional reasoning | conservation/box models | conservation/box models | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | special cases | special cases | extreme cases | extreme cases | discretization | discretization | spring models | spring models | symmetry | symmetry | invariance | invariance | discarding information | discarding information | oil imports | oil imports | tree representations | tree representations | gold | gold | random walks | random walks | UNIX | UNIX | triangle bisection | triangle bisection | pentagonal heat flow | pentagonal heat flow | jump heights | jump heights | simple calculus | simple calculus | drag | drag | cycling | cycling | swimming | swimming | flying | flying | flight | flight | algebraic symmetry | algebraic symmetry | densities | densities | hydrogen size | hydrogen size | bending of light | bending of light | Buckingham Pi Theorem | Buckingham Pi Theorem | pulley acceleration | pulley acceleration | waves | waves

License

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6.336J Introduction to Numerical Simulation (SMA 5211) (MIT) 6.336J Introduction to Numerical Simulation (SMA 5211) (MIT)

Description

6.336J is an introduction to computational techniques for the simulation of a large variety of engineering and physical systems. Applications are drawn from aerospace, mechanical, electrical, chemical and biological engineering, and materials science. Topics include: mathematical formulations; network problems; sparse direct and iterative matrix solution techniques; Newton methods for nonlinear problems; discretization methods for ordinary, time-periodic and partial differential equations, fast methods for partial differential and integral equations, techniques for dynamical system model reduction and approaches for molecular dynamics. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5211 (Introduction to Numerical Simulation). 6.336J is an introduction to computational techniques for the simulation of a large variety of engineering and physical systems. Applications are drawn from aerospace, mechanical, electrical, chemical and biological engineering, and materials science. Topics include: mathematical formulations; network problems; sparse direct and iterative matrix solution techniques; Newton methods for nonlinear problems; discretization methods for ordinary, time-periodic and partial differential equations, fast methods for partial differential and integral equations, techniques for dynamical system model reduction and approaches for molecular dynamics. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5211 (Introduction to Numerical Simulation).

Subjects

Numerical Simulation | Numerical Simulation | simulation | simulation | mathematics | mathematics | network problems | network problems | matrix solution | matrix solution | Newton method | Newton method | nonlinear problems | nonlinear problems | discretization methods | discretization methods | differential equations | differential equations | integral equations | integral equations | model-order reduction | model-order reduction | Monte Carlo | Monte Carlo | 6.336 | 6.336 | 2.096 | 2.096 | 16.910 | 16.910

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT) 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints. This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.

Subjects

numerical integration | numerical integration | ODEs | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | finite element | finite element | discretization | discretization | PDEs | PDEs | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | probabilistic methods | optimization | optimization | omputational methods | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | aerospace engineering | computational methods | computational methods

License

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16.225 Computational Mechanics of Materials (MIT) 16.225 Computational Mechanics of Materials (MIT)

Description

16.225 is a graduate level course on Computational Mechanics of Materials. The primary focus of this course is on the teaching of state-of-the-art numerical methods for the analysis of the nonlinear continuum response of materials. The range of material behavior considered in this course includes: linear and finite deformation elasticity, inelasticity and dynamics. Numerical formulation and algorithms include: variational formulation and variational constitutive updates, finite element discretization, error estimation, constrained problems, time integration algorithms and convergence analysis. There is a strong emphasis on the (parallel) computer implementation of algorithms in programming assignments. The application to real engineering applications and problems in engineering science is 16.225 is a graduate level course on Computational Mechanics of Materials. The primary focus of this course is on the teaching of state-of-the-art numerical methods for the analysis of the nonlinear continuum response of materials. The range of material behavior considered in this course includes: linear and finite deformation elasticity, inelasticity and dynamics. Numerical formulation and algorithms include: variational formulation and variational constitutive updates, finite element discretization, error estimation, constrained problems, time integration algorithms and convergence analysis. There is a strong emphasis on the (parallel) computer implementation of algorithms in programming assignments. The application to real engineering applications and problems in engineering science is

Subjects

Computational Mechanics | Computational Mechanics | Computation | Computation | Mechanics | Mechanics | Materials | Materials | Numerical Methods | Numerical Methods | Numerical | Numerical | Nonlinear Continuum Response | Nonlinear Continuum Response | Continuum | Continuum | Deformation | Deformation | Elasticity | Elasticity | Inelasticity | Inelasticity | Dynamics | Dynamics | Variational Formulation | Variational Formulation | Variational Constitutive Updates | Variational Constitutive Updates | Finite Element | Finite Element | Discretization | Discretization | Error Estimation | Error Estimation | Constrained Problems | Constrained Problems | Time Integration | Time Integration | Convergence Analysis | Convergence Analysis | Programming | Programming | Continuum Response | Continuum Response | Computational | Computational | state-of-the-art | state-of-the-art | methods | methods | modeling | modeling | simulation | simulation | mechanical | mechanical | response | response | engineering | engineering | aerospace | aerospace | civil | civil | material | material | science | science | biomechanics | biomechanics | behavior | behavior | finite | finite | deformation | deformation | elasticity | elasticity | inelasticity | inelasticity | contact | contact | friction | friction | coupled | coupled | numerical | numerical | formulation | formulation | algorithms | algorithms | Variational | Variational | constitutive | constitutive | updates | updates | element | element | discretization | discretization | mesh | mesh | generation | generation | error | error | estimation | estimation | constrained | constrained | problems | problems | time | time | convergence | convergence | analysis | analysis | parallel | parallel | computer | computer | implementation | implementation | programming | programming | assembly | assembly | equation-solving | equation-solving | formulating | formulating | implementing | implementing | complex | complex | approximations | approximations | equations | equations | motion | motion | dynamic | dynamic | deformations | deformations | continua | continua | plasticity | plasticity | rate-dependency | rate-dependency | integration | integration

License

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18.098 Street-Fighting Mathematics (MIT) 18.098 Street-Fighting Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course teaches the art of guessing results and solving problems without doing a proof or an exact calculation. Techniques include extreme-cases reasoning, dimensional analysis, successive approximation, discretization, generalization, and pictorial analysis. Applications include mental calculation, solid geometry, musical intervals, logarithms, integration, infinite series, solitaire, and differential equations. (No epsilons or deltas are harmed by taking this course.) This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course teaches the art of guessing results and solving problems without doing a proof or an exact calculation. Techniques include extreme-cases reasoning, dimensional analysis, successive approximation, discretization, generalization, and pictorial analysis. Applications include mental calculation, solid geometry, musical intervals, logarithms, integration, infinite series, solitaire, and differential equations. (No epsilons or deltas are harmed by taking this course.) This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

extreme-cases reasoning | extreme-cases reasoning | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | discretization | discretization | drag | drag | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | pendulum | pendulum | pictorial proofs | pictorial proofs | analogy | analogy | operators | operators | summation | summation | square roots | square roots | logarithms | logarithms | musical intervals | musical intervals | taking out the big part | taking out the big part | integration | integration | differentiation | differentiation

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT) 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints. This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.

Subjects

numerical integration | numerical integration | ODEs | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | finite element | finite element | discretization | discretization | PDEs | PDEs | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | probabilistic methods | optimization | optimization | omputational methods | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | aerospace engineering | computational methods | computational methods

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT) 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints. This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.

Subjects

numerical integration | numerical integration | ODEs | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | finite element | finite element | discretization | discretization | PDEs | PDEs | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | probabilistic methods | optimization | optimization | omputational methods | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | aerospace engineering | computational methods | computational methods

License

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12.950 Atmospheric and Oceanic Modeling (MIT)

Description

The numerical methods, formulation and parameterizations used in models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean will be described in detail. Widely used numerical methods will be the focus but we will also review emerging concepts and new methods. The numerics underlying a hierarchy of models will be discussed, ranging from simple GFD models to the high-end GCMs. In the context of ocean GCMs, we will describe parameterization of geostrophic eddies, mixing and the surface and bottom boundary layers. In the atmosphere, we will review parameterizations of convection and large scale condensation, the planetary boundary layer and radiative transfer.

Subjects

numerical methods | formulation | parameterizations | models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean | numerics underlying a hierarchy of models | simple GFD models | high-end GCMs | ocean GCMs | parameterization of geostrophic eddies | mixing | surface and bottom boundary layers | atmosphere | parameterizations of convection | large scale condensation | planetary boundary layer | radiative transfer | finite difference method | Spatial discretization | numerical dispersion | Series expansion | Time-stepping | Space-time discretization | Shallow water dynamics | Barotropic models | Quasi-geostrophic equations | Quasi-geostrophic models | Eddy parameterization | Vertical coordinates | primitive equations | Boundary layer parameterizations

License

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6.336J Introduction to Numerical Simulation (SMA 5211) (MIT)

Description

6.336J is an introduction to computational techniques for the simulation of a large variety of engineering and physical systems. Applications are drawn from aerospace, mechanical, electrical, chemical and biological engineering, and materials science. Topics include: mathematical formulations; network problems; sparse direct and iterative matrix solution techniques; Newton methods for nonlinear problems; discretization methods for ordinary, time-periodic and partial differential equations, fast methods for partial differential and integral equations, techniques for dynamical system model reduction and approaches for molecular dynamics. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5211 (Introduction to Numerical Simulation).

Subjects

Numerical Simulation | simulation | mathematics | network problems | matrix solution | Newton method | nonlinear problems | discretization methods | differential equations | integral equations | model-order reduction | Monte Carlo | 6.336 | 2.096 | 16.910

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m and .mat files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

numerical integration | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite volume | finite element | discretization | PDEs | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | optimization | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | computational methods

License

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13.472J Computational Geometry (MIT)

Description

Topics in surface modeling: b-splines, non-uniform rational b-splines, physically based deformable surfaces, sweeps and generalized cylinders, offsets, blending and filleting surfaces. Non-linear solvers and intersection problems. Solid modeling: constructive solid geometry, boundary representation, non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models, octrees. Robustness of geometric computations. Interval methods. Finite and boundary element discretization methods for continuum mechanics problems. Scientific visualization. Variational geometry. Tolerances. Inspection methods. Feature representation and recognition. Shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing. Involves analytical and programming assignments.

Subjects

surface modeling | b-splines | deformable surfaces | generalized cylinders | offsets | filleting surfaces | Non-linear solvers and intersection problems | Solid modeling | boundary representation | non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models | octrees | Interval methods | discretization methods | Scientific visualization | Variational geometry | Tolerances | Inspection methods | Shape interrogation | 2.158J | 1.128J | 16.940J | 13.472 | 2.158 | 1.128 | 16.940

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4.105 Geometric Disciplines and Architecture Skills: Reciprocal Methodologies (MIT)

Description

This course is an intensive introduction to architectural design tools and process, and is taught through a series of short exercises. The conceptual basis of each exercise is in the interrogation of the geometric principles that lie at the core of each skill. Skills covered in this course range from techniques of hand drafting, to generation of 3D computer models, physical model-building, sketching, and diagramming. Weekly lectures and pin-ups address the conventions associated with modes of architectural representation and their capacity to convey ideas. This course is tailored and offered only to first-year M.Arch students.

Subjects

geometry | representation | architecture | drawing | projection | perspective | planes | axonometric | stereotomy | volume | surface | curvature | curves | discretization | generation | construction | publication | presentation

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2.158J Computational Geometry (MIT)

Description

Topics in surface modeling: b-splines, non-uniform rational b-splines, physically based deformable surfaces, sweeps and generalized cylinders, offsets, blending and filleting surfaces. Non-linear solvers and intersection problems. Solid modeling: constructive solid geometry, boundary representation, non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models, octrees. Robustness of geometric computations. Interval methods. Finite and boundary element discretization methods for continuum mechanics problems. Scientific visualization. Variational geometry. Tolerances. Inspection methods. Feature representation and recognition. Shape interrogation for design, analysis, and manufacturing. Involves analytical and programming assignments. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Depar

Subjects

surface modeling | b-splines | deformable surfaces | generalized cylinders | offsets | filleting surfaces | Non-linear solvers and intersection problems | Solid modeling | boundary representation | non-manifold and mixed-dimension boundary representation models | octrees | Interval methods | discretization methods | Scientific visualization | Variational geometry | Tolerances | Inspection methods | Shape interrogation | 13.472J | 13.472 | 2.158 | 1.128 | 16.940

License

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16.225 Computational Mechanics of Materials (MIT)

Description

16.225 is a graduate level course on Computational Mechanics of Materials. The primary focus of this course is on the teaching of state-of-the-art numerical methods for the analysis of the nonlinear continuum response of materials. The range of material behavior considered in this course includes: linear and finite deformation elasticity, inelasticity and dynamics. Numerical formulation and algorithms include: variational formulation and variational constitutive updates, finite element discretization, error estimation, constrained problems, time integration algorithms and convergence analysis. There is a strong emphasis on the (parallel) computer implementation of algorithms in programming assignments. The application to real engineering applications and problems in engineering science is

Subjects

Computational Mechanics | Computation | Mechanics | Materials | Numerical Methods | Numerical | Nonlinear Continuum Response | Continuum | Deformation | Elasticity | Inelasticity | Dynamics | Variational Formulation | Variational Constitutive Updates | Finite Element | Discretization | Error Estimation | Constrained Problems | Time Integration | Convergence Analysis | Programming | Continuum Response | Computational | state-of-the-art | methods | modeling | simulation | mechanical | response | engineering | aerospace | civil | material | science | biomechanics | behavior | finite | deformation | elasticity | inelasticity | contact | friction | coupled | numerical | formulation | algorithms | Variational | constitutive | updates | element | discretization | mesh | generation | error | estimation | constrained | problems | time | convergence | analysis | parallel | computer | implementation | programming | assembly | equation-solving | formulating | implementing | complex | approximations | equations | motion | dynamic | deformations | continua | plasticity | rate-dependency | integration

License

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18.098 Street-Fighting Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course teaches the art of guessing results and solving problems without doing a proof or an exact calculation. Techniques include extreme-cases reasoning, dimensional analysis, successive approximation, discretization, generalization, and pictorial analysis. Applications include mental calculation, solid geometry, musical intervals, logarithms, integration, infinite series, solitaire, and differential equations. (No epsilons or deltas are harmed by taking this course.) This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

extreme-cases reasoning | dimensional analysis | discretization | drag | fluid mechanics | pendulum | pictorial proofs | analogy | operators | summation | square roots | logarithms | musical intervals | taking out the big part | integration | differentiation

License

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6.055J The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course teaches simple reasoning techniques for complex phenomena: divide and conquer, dimensional analysis, extreme cases, continuity, scaling, successive approximation, balancing, cheap calculus, and symmetry. Applications are drawn from the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Examples include bird and machine flight, neuron biophysics, weather, prime numbers, and animal locomotion. Emphasis is on low-cost experiments to test ideas and on fostering curiosity about phenomena in the world.

Subjects

approximation | science | engineering | managing complexity | divide and conquer | heterogeneous hierarchies | homogeneous hierarchies | proportional reasoning | conservation/box models | dimensional analysis | special cases | extreme cases | discretization | spring models | symmetry | invariance | discarding information | oil imports | tree representations | gold | random walks | UNIX | triangle bisection | pentagonal heat flow | jump heights | simple calculus | drag | cycling | swimming | flying | flight | algebraic symmetry | densities | hydrogen size | bending of light | Buckingham Pi Theorem | pulley acceleration | waves

License

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6.336J Introduction to Numerical Simulation (SMA 5211) (MIT)

Description

6.336J is an introduction to computational techniques for the simulation of a large variety of engineering and physical systems. Applications are drawn from aerospace, mechanical, electrical, chemical and biological engineering, and materials science. Topics include: mathematical formulations; network problems; sparse direct and iterative matrix solution techniques; Newton methods for nonlinear problems; discretization methods for ordinary, time-periodic and partial differential equations, fast methods for partial differential and integral equations, techniques for dynamical system model reduction and approaches for molecular dynamics. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5211 (Introduction to Numerical Simulation).

Subjects

Numerical Simulation | simulation | mathematics | network problems | matrix solution | Newton method | nonlinear problems | discretization methods | differential equations | integral equations | model-order reduction | Monte Carlo | 6.336 | 2.096 | 16.910

License

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16.90 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to numerical methods and computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques covered include numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; numerical discretization of partial differential equations; and probabilistic methods for quantifying the impact of variability. Specific emphasis is given to finite volume methods in fluid mechanics, and finite element methods in structural mechanics.Acknowledgement: Prof. David Darmofal taught this course in prior years, and created some of the materials found in this OCW site.

Subjects

numerical integration | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite volume | finite element | discretization | PDEs | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | optimization | computational methods | aerospace engineering | Monte Carlo | Fourier stability analysis | Matrix stability analysis | Runge-Kutta | convergence | accuracy | stiffness | weighted residual | statistical sampling | sensitivity analysis

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.

Subjects

numerical integration | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite volume | finite element | discretization | PDEs | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | optimization | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | computational methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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