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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT) 11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | the proper relationship between business | government | government | and the public interest | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | CIS | CIS | Asia | Asia | business | business | public interest | public interest | economic growth | economic growth | equity | equity | cities | cities | institution-building | institution-building | institutions | institutions | liberalization | liberalization | privatization | privatization | entrepreneurs | entrepreneurs | private firms | private firms | law | law | property rights | property rights

License

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14.73 The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT) 14.73 The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT)

Description

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor—or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poor? Should we leave economic development to This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor—or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poor? Should we leave economic development to

Subjects

developing countries | developing countries | child labor | child labor | randomized evaluations | randomized evaluations | poverty and economic growth | poverty and economic growth | microfinance | microfinance | World Bank and IMF | World Bank and IMF

License

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17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics. The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the instructors. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics. The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the instructors.

Subjects

liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | 17.100 | 17.100 | 14.781 | 14.781 | 15.678 | 15.678 | Political science | Political science | theories | theories

License

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14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT) 14.11 Special Topics in Economics: The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT)

Description

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others. This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, have had some economics, and believe that economists might have something useful to say about this question. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Does foreign aid help? What can we do about corruption? Should we leave it all to the markets? Should we leave it to the non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Where is the best place to intervene? How do we deal with the disease burden? How do we improve schools? And many others.

Subjects

challenge | challenge | world poverty | world poverty | economics | economics | per capita income | per capita income | health | health | fertility | fertility | mortality | mortality | birth | birth | death | death | microfinance | microfinance | NGOs | NGOs | poor | poor | education | education | colonialism | colonialism | globalization | globalization | corruption | corruption | India | India | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | economic growth | economic growth | development | development | credit markets | credit markets | prosperity | prosperity

License

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | ESD.284J | ESD.284J | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284 | 11.418 | 11.418 | ESD.192 | ESD.192

License

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14.452 Economic Growth (MIT) 14.452 Economic Growth (MIT)

Description

This half semester class presents an introduction to macroeconomic modeling, focusing on the theory of economic growth and some of its applications. It will introduce a number of models of non-stochastic and stochastic macroeconomic equilibrium. It will use these models to shed light both on the process of economic growth at the world level and on sources of income and growth differences across countries. This half semester class presents an introduction to macroeconomic modeling, focusing on the theory of economic growth and some of its applications. It will introduce a number of models of non-stochastic and stochastic macroeconomic equilibrium. It will use these models to shed light both on the process of economic growth at the world level and on sources of income and growth differences across countries.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | development | development | modern | modern | world income distribution | world income distribution | Solow growth model | Solow growth model | income differences | income differences | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | optimal and competitive allocations | optimal and competitive allocations | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | overlapping generations | overlapping generations | dynamic efficiency | dynamic efficiency | growth under uncertainty | growth under uncertainty | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | neoclassical endogenous growth | neoclassical endogenous growth | capital accumulation | capital accumulation | externalities | externalities | human capital | human capital | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | expanding input varieties | expanding input varieties | Schumpeterian models | Schumpeterian models | endogenous skill-bias technological change | endogenous skill-bias technological change | endogenous labor-augmenting technological change | endogenous labor-augmenting technological change | interdependences | interdependences | technology diffusion | technology diffusion | open economy | open economy | trade | trade

License

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Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics.  The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the ins Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics.  The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the ins

Subjects

liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | 17.100 | 17.100 | 14.781 | 14.781 | 15.678 | 15.678

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.05 Intermediate Applied Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.05 Intermediate Applied Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This subject considers three topics of macroeconomics that are alive andcontroversial for policy today.The topics are: exchange-rate regimes- their role in the Great Depression andtoday; economic growth- the roles of capital accumulation, increased education, and technological progress in determining economic growth; and savings- the effect of government and private debt on economic growth. This subject considers three topics of macroeconomics that are alive andcontroversial for policy today.The topics are: exchange-rate regimes- their role in the Great Depression andtoday; economic growth- the roles of capital accumulation, increased education, and technological progress in determining economic growth; and savings- the effect of government and private debt on economic growth.

Subjects

exchange-rate | exchange-rate | Great Depression | Great Depression | capital accumulation | capital accumulation | economic growth | economic growth | public debt | public debt | private debt | private debt

License

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

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17.158 Political Economy of Western Europe (MIT) 17.158 Political Economy of Western Europe (MIT)

Description

Examines role of European states in postwar period of rapid economic growth and current crisis. Includes analysis of different state traditions ("etatist," liberal, authoritarian); government's role in decline of some economies and rise of others; why and where Keynesianism, indicative planning, and state enterprises were introduced; alternative conceptions of contemporary economic problems (new international division of labor? too few producers? oil shock?); and of policies to deal with them (industrial policy? monetarism? protectionism?). Examines role of European states in postwar period of rapid economic growth and current crisis. Includes analysis of different state traditions ("etatist," liberal, authoritarian); government's role in decline of some economies and rise of others; why and where Keynesianism, indicative planning, and state enterprises were introduced; alternative conceptions of contemporary economic problems (new international division of labor? too few producers? oil shock?); and of policies to deal with them (industrial policy? monetarism? protectionism?).

Subjects

Europe | Europe | postwar | postwar | economic growth | economic growth | economic crisis | economic crisis | etatist | etatist | liberal | liberal | authoritarian | authoritarian | Keynesianism | Keynesianism | indicative planning | indicative planning | state enterprises | state enterprises | economic problems | economic problems | division of labor | division of labor | oil shock | oil shock | industrial policy | industrial policy | monetarism | monetarism | protectionism | protectionism

License

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11.483 Housing and Land Use in Rapidly Urbanizing Regions (MIT) 11.483 Housing and Land Use in Rapidly Urbanizing Regions (MIT)

Description

A truly inter-disciplinary course, Housing and Land Use in Rapidly Urbanizing Regions reviews how law, economics, sociology, political science, and planning conceptualize urban land and property rights and uses cases to discuss what these different lenses illuminate and obscure. It also looks at how the social sciences might be informed by how design, cartography, and visual studies conceptualize space's physicality. This year's topics include land trusts for affordable housing, mixed-use in public space, and critical cartography. A truly inter-disciplinary course, Housing and Land Use in Rapidly Urbanizing Regions reviews how law, economics, sociology, political science, and planning conceptualize urban land and property rights and uses cases to discuss what these different lenses illuminate and obscure. It also looks at how the social sciences might be informed by how design, cartography, and visual studies conceptualize space's physicality. This year's topics include land trusts for affordable housing, mixed-use in public space, and critical cartography.

Subjects

housing | housing | land use | land use | urban | urban | urban land | urban land | property rights | property rights | economic growth | economic growth | social justice | social justice | design | design | policy | policy | public space | public space | city | city | urban planning | urban planning

License

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures. This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures.

Subjects

11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.192 | ESD.192 | regional growth | regional growth | political economy | political economy | spatial economic analysis | spatial economic analysis | regional economic growth | regional economic growth | economics | economics | regional theories | regional theories | regional planning | regional planning | regional and urban economics | regional and urban economics | neoclassical | neoclassical | dispersal economies | dispersal economies | regional accounting | regional accounting | social accounting matrices | social accounting matrices | underground economy | underground economy | price indices | price indices | shift share analyses | shift share analyses | energy | energy | determinants of growth | determinants of growth

License

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11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT) 11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors. This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | technological capabilities | technological capabilities | world technological frontier | world technological frontier | innovation | innovation | new products | new products | production engineering | production engineering | project execution | project execution | borrowed technology | borrowed technology | third world development | third world development | industrialization | industrialization | pre WWII | pre WWII | post WWII | post WWII | underdevelopment | underdevelopment | lendingm | lendingm | government regulation | government regulation | 11.491 | 11.491 | 17.176 | 17.176

License

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Technical Capabilities (MIT) Technical Capabilities (MIT)

Description

The economic growth of developing countries requires the acquisition of technological capabilities. In countries at the world technological frontier, such capabilities refer to cutting edge skills to innovate entirely new products. In developing countries, the requisite technological capabilities are broader, and include production engineering, project execution and incremental innovation to make borrowed technology work. Theories of technology acquisition are examined. The empirical evidence is taken from two sets of developing countries; the most advanced (Taiwan, Korea, India, China and Brazil) and the least advanced (Africa and Middle Eastern countries). The economic growth of developing countries requires the acquisition of technological capabilities. In countries at the world technological frontier, such capabilities refer to cutting edge skills to innovate entirely new products. In developing countries, the requisite technological capabilities are broader, and include production engineering, project execution and incremental innovation to make borrowed technology work. Theories of technology acquisition are examined. The empirical evidence is taken from two sets of developing countries; the most advanced (Taiwan, Korea, India, China and Brazil) and the least advanced (Africa and Middle Eastern countries).

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | technological capabilities | technological capabilities | world technological frontier | world technological frontier | innovation | innovation | new products | new products | production engineering | production engineering | project execution | project execution | borrowed technology | borrowed technology

License

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14.452 Economic Growth (MIT) 14.452 Economic Growth (MIT)

Description

This half semester class presents an introduction to macroeconomic modeling, focusing on the theory of economic growth and some of its applications. It will introduce a number of models of non-stochastic and stochastic macroeconomic equilibrium. It will use these models to shed light both on the process of economic growth at the world level and on sources of income and growth differences across countries. This half semester class presents an introduction to macroeconomic modeling, focusing on the theory of economic growth and some of its applications. It will introduce a number of models of non-stochastic and stochastic macroeconomic equilibrium. It will use these models to shed light both on the process of economic growth at the world level and on sources of income and growth differences across countries.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | development | development | modern | modern | world income distribution | world income distribution | Solow growth model | Solow growth model | income differences | income differences | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | optimal and competitive allocations | optimal and competitive allocations | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | overlapping generations | overlapping generations | dynamic efficiency | dynamic efficiency | growth under uncertainty | growth under uncertainty | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | neoclassical endogenous growth | neoclassical endogenous growth | capital accumulation | capital accumulation | externalities | externalities | human capital | human capital | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | expanding input varieties | expanding input varieties | directed technical change | directed technical change | endogenous skill-bias technological change | endogenous skill-bias technological change | endogenous labor-augmenting technological change | endogenous labor-augmenting technological change | interdependences | interdependences | technology diffusion | technology diffusion | open economy | open economy | trade | trade

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.158 Political Economy of Western Europe (MIT) 17.158 Political Economy of Western Europe (MIT)

Description

Examines role of European states in postwar period of rapid economic growth and current crisis. Includes analysis of different state traditions ("etatist," liberal, authoritarian); government's role in decline of some economies and rise of others; why and where Keynesianism, indicative planning, and state enterprises were introduced; alternative conceptions of contemporary economic problems (new international division of labor? too few producers? oil shock?); and of policies to deal with them (industrial policy? monetarism? protectionism?). Examines role of European states in postwar period of rapid economic growth and current crisis. Includes analysis of different state traditions ("etatist," liberal, authoritarian); government's role in decline of some economies and rise of others; why and where Keynesianism, indicative planning, and state enterprises were introduced; alternative conceptions of contemporary economic problems (new international division of labor? too few producers? oil shock?); and of policies to deal with them (industrial policy? monetarism? protectionism?).

Subjects

Europe | Europe | postwar | postwar | economic growth | economic growth | economic crisis | economic crisis | etatist | etatist | liberal | liberal | authoritarian | authoritarian | Keynesianism | Keynesianism | indicative planning | indicative planning | state enterprises | state enterprises | economic problems | economic problems | division of labor | division of labor | oil shock | oil shock | industrial policy | industrial policy | monetarism | monetarism | protectionism | protectionism

License

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce classic macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, technological progress, and budget deficits. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on the aggregate behavior of individuals. These analytical tools will be used to understand the recent experience of the United States and other countries and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance. This course is designed to introduce classic macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, technological progress, and budget deficits. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on the aggregate behavior of individuals. These analytical tools will be used to understand the recent experience of the United States and other countries and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance.

Subjects

principles of macroeconomics | principles of macroeconomics | measuring macroeconomic variables | measuring macroeconomic variables | production functions | production functions | labor markets | labor markets | consumption | consumption | investment | investment | economic growth | economic growth | IS-LM model | IS-LM model | AS-AD model | AS-AD model | classical business policy | classical business policy | price rigidity | price rigidity | wage rigidity | wage rigidity | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | economic crises | economic crises | policy in an open economy | policy in an open economy | global economic imbalances | global economic imbalances

License

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14.05 Intermediate Applied Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.05 Intermediate Applied Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This subject considers three topics of macroeconomics that are alive and controversial for policy today. The topics are: economic growth - the roles of capital accumulation, increased education, and technological progress in determining economic growth; savings - the effect of government and private debt on economic growth; and exchange-rate regimes - their role in the Great Depression and today. This subject considers three topics of macroeconomics that are alive and controversial for policy today. The topics are: economic growth - the roles of capital accumulation, increased education, and technological progress in determining economic growth; savings - the effect of government and private debt on economic growth; and exchange-rate regimes - their role in the Great Depression and today.

Subjects

exchange-rate | exchange-rate | Great Depression | Great Depression | capital accumulation | capital accumulation | economic growth | economic growth | public debt | public debt | private debt | private debt

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | government | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | CIS | Asia | business | public interest | economic growth | equity | cities | institution-building | institutions | liberalization | privatization | entrepreneurs | private firms | law | property rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce classic macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, technological progress, and budget deficits. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on the aggregate behavior of individuals. These analytical tools will be used to understand the recent experience of the United States and other countries and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance.

Subjects

principles of macroeconomics | measuring macroeconomic variables | production functions | labor markets | consumption | investment | economic growth | IS-LM model | AS-AD model | classical business policy | price rigidity | wage rigidity | monetary policy | fiscal policy | economic crises | policy in an open economy | global economic imbalances

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.05 Intermediate Applied Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This subject considers three topics of macroeconomics that are alive and controversial for policy today. The topics are: economic growth - the roles of capital accumulation, increased education, and technological progress in determining economic growth; savings - the effect of government and private debt on economic growth; and exchange-rate regimes - their role in the Great Depression and today.

Subjects

exchange-rate | Great Depression | capital accumulation | economic growth | public debt | private debt

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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