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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT) 11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | the proper relationship between business | government | government | and the public interest | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | CIS | CIS | Asia | Asia | business | business | public interest | public interest | economic growth | economic growth | equity | equity | cities | cities | institution-building | institution-building | institutions | institutions | liberalization | liberalization | privatization | privatization | entrepreneurs | entrepreneurs | private firms | private firms | law | law | property rights | property rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.223 Global Markets, National Policies, and the Competitive Advantages of Firms (MIT) 15.223 Global Markets, National Policies, and the Competitive Advantages of Firms (MIT)

Description

The world is changing in two fundamental ways. First, the development of a truly global market in products, services, capital, and even certain types of labor is changing the basic terms of competition for an array of different firms and industries. Second, the rules and institutions governing the new international economic order are still in flux. National regulations are no longer adequate yet international accords over trade, intellectual property, labor standards, and a host of other issues are fiercely and frequently contested by competing interests. The final results of these debates will determine who wins and who loses in the new global economy. Understanding the interaction between environment and business around the world is the key to understanding both the possibilities for and The world is changing in two fundamental ways. First, the development of a truly global market in products, services, capital, and even certain types of labor is changing the basic terms of competition for an array of different firms and industries. Second, the rules and institutions governing the new international economic order are still in flux. National regulations are no longer adequate yet international accords over trade, intellectual property, labor standards, and a host of other issues are fiercely and frequently contested by competing interests. The final results of these debates will determine who wins and who loses in the new global economy. Understanding the interaction between environment and business around the world is the key to understanding both the possibilities for and

Subjects

globalization | globalization | market economies | market economies | liberal market economies | liberal market economies | state-driven development | state-driven development | emerging markets | emerging markets | intellectual property | intellectual property | ngo | ngo | sustainability | sustainability | trade policy | trade policy | international trade | international trade | labor standards | labor standards | environmental standards | environmental standards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations. This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | developing--country governments | international | international | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | new--town development | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | developing countries | national planning | national planning | planners | planners | government institutions | government institutions | national government | national government | local government | local government | low-cost housing | low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | reform | reform | politics | politics | patronage | patronage | clientelism | clientelism | corruption | corruption | civil servants | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private | public vs. private

License

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.014 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT) 15.014 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT)

Description

15.014 focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management Evaluation of different economic development strategies Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention Problems faced by transition economies Challenges of developed countries   This course is a full-term version of Applied Macro- and International Economics (15.012), with additional topics. 15.014 focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management Evaluation of different economic development strategies Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention Problems faced by transition economies Challenges of developed countries   This course is a full-term version of Applied Macro- and International Economics (15.012), with additional topics.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | international economics | international economics | world economies | world economies | global trade | global trade | economic policy | economic policy | inflation | inflation | interest rates | interest rates | exchange rates | exchange rates | national economic strategies | national economic strategies | developing nations | developing nations | currency crisis | currency crisis | transition economies | transition economies | global markets | global markets | world bank | world bank | IMF | IMF | international monetary fund | international monetary fund | monetary policy | monetary policy | depression | depression | unemployment | unemployment | international financial architecture | international financial architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.014 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT) 15.014 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT)

Description

15.014 focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management Evaluation of different economic development strategies Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention Problems faced by transition economies Challenges of developed countries   This course is a full-term version of Applied Macro- and International Economics (15.012), with additional topics. 15.014 focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management Evaluation of different economic development strategies Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention Problems faced by transition economies Challenges of developed countries   This course is a full-term version of Applied Macro- and International Economics (15.012), with additional topics.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | international economics | international economics | world economies | world economies | global trade | global trade | economic policy | economic policy | inflation | inflation | interest rates | interest rates | exchange rates | exchange rates | national economic strategies | national economic strategies | developing nations | developing nations | currency crisis | currency crisis | transition economies | transition economies | global markets | global markets | world bank | world bank | IMF | IMF | international monetary fund | international monetary fund | monetary policy | monetary policy | depression | depression | unemployment | unemployment | international financial architecture | international financial architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Economic systems

Description

A learning object produced for the X4L Colossus Project, which describes different types of economic system.

Subjects

christy | colossus project | economic systems | economics | stevenson college edinburgh | x4l | command economies | mixed economies | free market economies | economic | colossus | systems | Social studies | POLITICS / ECONOMICS / LAW / SOCIAL SCIENCES | Teaching | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | L000 | E

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | government | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | CIS | Asia | business | public interest | economic growth | equity | cities | institution-building | institutions | liberalization | privatization | entrepreneurs | private firms | law | property rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | ESD.284J | ESD.284J | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284 | 11.418 | 11.418 | ESD.192 | ESD.192

License

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Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT) 14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT)

Description

This class focuses on labor institutions, the transformation of those institutions in the last three decades, and the possible relationship between that transformation and the shifting distribution of wage and salary income. The emphasis is on the United States and other advanced industrial countries, with some discussion of the relevance of the theory and analysis to developing economies. This class focuses on labor institutions, the transformation of those institutions in the last three decades, and the possible relationship between that transformation and the shifting distribution of wage and salary income. The emphasis is on the United States and other advanced industrial countries, with some discussion of the relevance of the theory and analysis to developing economies.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | institutions | institutions | unions | unions | worker motivation | worker motivation | technology | technology | social capital | social capital | networks | networks | identity | identity | careers | careers | transformation | transformation | distribution | distribution | wage | wage | salary | salary | income | income | United States | United States | advanced industrial countries | advanced industrial countries | theory | theory | analysis | analysis | developing economies | developing economies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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International Relations (MIT) International Relations (MIT)

Description

This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior.

Subjects

globalization | globalization | migration | migration | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | environment | environment | public policy | public policy | transnational organization | transnational organization | sustainable development | sustainable development | global change | global change | government | government | technology | technology | security | security | civil society | civil society | political theory | political theory | theory | theory | policy | policy | emergent structures | emergent structures | processes | processes | flows | flows | goods | goods | services | services | national boundaries | national boundaries | international trade | international trade | immigration | immigration | international policies | international policies | macro-level | macro-level | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | comparative politics | comparative politics | integration | integration | national economies | national economies | IR | IR | IPE | IPE | sovereignty | sovereignty | inter-state relations | inter-state relations | supra-state | supra-state | non-state | non-state | narrow globalization | narrow globalization | comlex view | comlex view | international conflict | international conflict | domestic politics | domestic politics | international politics | international politics | population movements | population movements | macro-level behavior | macro-level behavior | complex view | complex view

License

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrialized nations | industrialized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business | aging | aging | population | population | countries | countries | developing | developing | development | development | industrial | industrial | industrialized | industrialized | nations | nations | politics | politics | political | political | theory | theory | sustainable | sustainable | public | public | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | economies | economies | transition | transition | growth | growth | institutions | institutions | institutional | institutional | trade | trade | international | international

License

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17.433 International Relations of East Asia (MIT) 17.433 International Relations of East Asia (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce and analyze the international relations of East Asia. With four great powers, three nuclear weapons states, and two of the world's largest economies, East Asia is one of the most dynamic and consequential regions in world politics. This course will examine the sources of conflict and cooperation in both periods, assessing competing explanations for key events in East Asia's international relations. Readings will be drawn from international relations theory, political science and history. The aim of this course is to introduce and analyze the international relations of East Asia. With four great powers, three nuclear weapons states, and two of the world's largest economies, East Asia is one of the most dynamic and consequential regions in world politics. This course will examine the sources of conflict and cooperation in both periods, assessing competing explanations for key events in East Asia's international relations. Readings will be drawn from international relations theory, political science and history.

Subjects

International relations | International relations | East Asia | East Asia | great powers | great powers | nuclear weapons states | nuclear weapons states | largest economies | largest economies | world politics | world politics | Cold War | Cold War | competition | competition | conflict superpowers | conflict superpowers | post-Cold War era | post-Cold War era | global economy | global economy | balance | balance | power | power | cooperation | cooperation | theory | theory | political science | political science | history | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT) HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class

Subjects

health care | health care | health care policy | health care policy | patient behavior | patient behavior | information management | information management | medical informatics | medical informatics | medical records | medical records | health record | health record | online medicine | online medicine | PHR | PHR | EHR | EHR | patient privacy | patient privacy | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | start-up | start-up | innovation | innovation | cybermedicine | cybermedicine | telemedicine | telemedicine | non-profit | non-profit | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | insurance | insurance | hospital | hospital | doctor | doctor | patient | patient | medicine | medicine | social networking | social networking | economies of scale | economies of scale | patient education | patient education | self-care | self-care | network integration | network integration | decision support tools | decision support tools | disease managment | disease managment | health economics | health economics | clinical effectiveness | clinical effectiveness | medical software | medical software | mobile applications | mobile applications | intellectual property | intellectual property

License

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | social control | bureaucracies | good governance | market institutions | collective action | decision making | political savvy | legal sensibility

License

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures. This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures.

Subjects

11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.192 | ESD.192 | regional growth | regional growth | political economy | political economy | spatial economic analysis | spatial economic analysis | regional economic growth | regional economic growth | economics | economics | regional theories | regional theories | regional planning | regional planning | regional and urban economics | regional and urban economics | neoclassical | neoclassical | dispersal economies | dispersal economies | regional accounting | regional accounting | social accounting matrices | social accounting matrices | underground economy | underground economy | price indices | price indices | shift share analyses | shift share analyses | energy | energy | determinants of growth | determinants of growth

License

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11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT) 11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

As an introduction to the field of Housing, Community, and Economic Development (HCED), the course is structured to: Advance student's understanding of how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, the local economy, and neighborhood institutions; Provide an overview of techniques for framing public and private interventions to meet housing and community development agendas, broadly defined, of inner city and low income neighborhoods; Review and critique specific programs, policies and strategies that are (and have been) directed at local development and neighborhood regeneration issues; Give students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the "housing, community, and economic development" process and the various roles that planner As an introduction to the field of Housing, Community, and Economic Development (HCED), the course is structured to: Advance student's understanding of how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, the local economy, and neighborhood institutions; Provide an overview of techniques for framing public and private interventions to meet housing and community development agendas, broadly defined, of inner city and low income neighborhoods; Review and critique specific programs, policies and strategies that are (and have been) directed at local development and neighborhood regeneration issues; Give students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the "housing, community, and economic development" process and the various roles that planner

Subjects

Public policy | Public policy | Private markets | Private markets | Housing | Housing | Economic development | Economic development | The local economy | The local economy | Neighborhood institutions | Neighborhood institutions | Public and private interventions | Public and private interventions | Housing and community development agendas | Housing and community development agendas | Inner city and low income neighborhoods | Inner city and low income neighborhoods | local economies | local economies | low income neighborhoods | low income neighborhoods | community development | community development | urban neighborhoods | urban neighborhoods | community organization | community organization | small business development | small business development | welfare | welfare | work | work | job training | job training | capital | capital | crime | crime | security | security | education | education | faith-based organizations | faith-based organizations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.223 Global Markets, National Politics and the Competitive Advantage of Firms (MIT) 15.223 Global Markets, National Politics and the Competitive Advantage of Firms (MIT)

Description

This course examines opportunities and risks firms face in today's global market. It provides conceptual tools for analyzing how governments and social institutions influence economic competition among firms embedded in different national settings. Public policies and institutions that shape competitive outcomes are examined through cases and analytical readings on different companies and industries operating in both developed and emerging markets. This course examines opportunities and risks firms face in today's global market. It provides conceptual tools for analyzing how governments and social institutions influence economic competition among firms embedded in different national settings. Public policies and institutions that shape competitive outcomes are examined through cases and analytical readings on different companies and industries operating in both developed and emerging markets.

Subjects

global markets | global markets | national politics | national politics | competitive advantage | competitive advantage | global economy | global economy | emerging markets | emerging markets | market economies | market economies | human rights | human rights | intellectual property | intellectual property

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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