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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations. This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | developing--country governments | international | international | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | new--town development | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | developing countries | national planning | national planning | planners | planners | government institutions | government institutions | national government | national government | local government | local government | low-cost housing | low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | reform | reform | politics | politics | patronage | patronage | clientelism | clientelism | corruption | corruption | civil servants | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT) HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class

Subjects

health care | health care | health care policy | health care policy | patient behavior | patient behavior | information management | information management | medical informatics | medical informatics | medical records | medical records | health record | health record | online medicine | online medicine | PHR | PHR | EHR | EHR | patient privacy | patient privacy | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | start-up | start-up | innovation | innovation | cybermedicine | cybermedicine | telemedicine | telemedicine | non-profit | non-profit | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | insurance | insurance | hospital | hospital | doctor | doctor | patient | patient | medicine | medicine | social networking | social networking | economies of scale | economies of scale | patient education | patient education | self-care | self-care | network integration | network integration | decision support tools | decision support tools | disease managment | disease managment | health economics | health economics | clinical effectiveness | clinical effectiveness | medical software | medical software | mobile applications | mobile applications | intellectual property | intellectual property

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | social control | bureaucracies | good governance | market institutions | collective action | decision making | political savvy | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | social control | bureaucracies | good governance | market institutions | collective action | decision making | political savvy | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | social control | bureaucracies | good governance | market institutions | collective action | decision making | political savvy | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | social control | bureaucracies | good governance | market institutions | collective action | decision making | political savvy | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | international | international organizations | NGOs | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | national planning | planners | government institutions | national government | local government | low-cost housing | new-town development | reform | politics | patronage | clientelism | corruption | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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International Trade

Description

Historically, international trade has played a critical role in enabling countries to grow, develop, and become economically powerful. Through international trade in goods and services, the economies of different countries are more closely linked to one another now than ever before. At the same time, the world economy is more turbulent now than it has been in decades. Keeping up with the shifting international environment has become a central concern in business strategy and national economic policy. This course uses the same fundamental methods of analysis deployed in other branches of economics, as the motives and behavior of individuals and firms remain the same whether they are in the context of international trade or domestic transactions. The student will learn, however, that in

Subjects

international trade | labor productivity | comparative advantage | income distribution | standard trade model | economies of scale | imperfect competition | international factor movements | national income accounting | international monetary system | optimum currency areas | global capital market | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | optimization | allocation | economic measurement | analysis | microeconomics | demand | supply | equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer preference | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | interior solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | individual demand | market demand | revealed preferences | substitution effect | income effect | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | network externalities | uncertainty | preference toward risk | risk premium | indifference curves | diversification | insurance | producer theory | production functions | short run | long run | returns to scale | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scope | learning | profit maximization | producer surplus | agricultural price support | tax | subsidy | exchange economy | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | monopoly | multiplant firm | social cost | price regulation | monopsony | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | bundling | monopolistic competition | game theory | oligopoly | Cournot | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)

Description

This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class.   Starting in Spring 2010, this course will be ti

Subjects

health care | health care policy | patient behavior | information management | medical informatics | medical records | health record | online medicine | PHR | EHR | patient privacy | entrepreneurship | start-up | innovation | cybermedicine | telemedicine | non-profit | pharmaceutical | insurance | hospital | doctor | patient | medicine | social networking | economies of scale | patient education | self-care | network integration | decision support tools | disease managment | health economics | clinical effectiveness | medical software | mobile applications | intellectual property

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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