Searching for energy storage : 30 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

circuit | circuit | electronic | electronic | abstraction | abstraction | lumped circuit | lumped circuit | digital | digital | amplifier | amplifier | differential equations | differential equations | time behavior | time behavior | energy storage | energy storage | semiconductor diode | semiconductor diode | field-effect | field-effect | field-effect transistor | field-effect transistor | resistor | resistor | source | source | inductor | inductor | capacitor | capacitor | diode | diode | series-parallel reduction | series-parallel reduction | voltage | voltage | current divider | current divider | node method | node method | linearity | linearity | superposition | superposition | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | power flow | power flow | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | binary signal | binary signal | MOSFET | MOSFET | noise margin | noise margin | singularity functions | singularity functions | sinusoidal-steady-state | sinusoidal-steady-state | impedance | impedance | frequency response curves | frequency response curves | operational amplifier | operational amplifier | Op-Amp | Op-Amp | negative feedback | negative feedback | positive feedback | positive feedback

License

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2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT) 2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology.

Subjects

nanotechnology | nanotechnology | nanostructure | nanostructure | energy | energy | energy transport | energy transport | energy storage | energy storage | energy carriers | energy carriers | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | quantum physics | quantum physics | thermoelectrics | thermoelectrics | semiconductor physics | semiconductor physics | solar cells | solar cells | waves and particles | waves and particles

License

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ESD.172J X PRIZE Workshop: Grand Challenges in Energy (MIT) ESD.172J X PRIZE Workshop: Grand Challenges in Energy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In 2004, the Ansari X PRIZE for suborbital spaceflight captured the public's imagination and revolutionized an industry, leveraging a $10M prize purse into over $100M in innovation. Building from that success, the X PRIZE Foundation is now developing new prizes to focus innovation around "Grand Challenge" themes, including genomics, energy, healthcare, and education. This course will examine the intersection of incentives and innovation, drawing on economic models, historic examples, and recent experience of the X PRIZE Foundation to help develop a future prize in Energy Storage Technologies. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In 2004, the Ansari X PRIZE for suborbital spaceflight captured the public's imagination and revolutionized an industry, leveraging a $10M prize purse into over $100M in innovation. Building from that success, the X PRIZE Foundation is now developing new prizes to focus innovation around "Grand Challenge" themes, including genomics, energy, healthcare, and education. This course will examine the intersection of incentives and innovation, drawing on economic models, historic examples, and recent experience of the X PRIZE Foundation to help develop a future prize in Energy Storage Technologies.

Subjects

ESD.172 | ESD.172 | EC.421 | EC.421 | energy | energy | competition | competition | innovation | innovation | incentivize prizes | incentivize prizes | resource allocation | resource allocation | innovation incentives | innovation incentives | Ansari | Ansari | X PRIZE | X PRIZE | economic models of innovation | economic models of innovation | energy storage | energy storage | grid-scale storage | grid-scale storage | prize matrix | prize matrix | genomics | genomics | Archon X PRIZE | Archon X PRIZE | Progressive Automotive X PRIZE | Progressive Automotive X PRIZE | grand challenges | grand challenges

License

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Poin Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Poin

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | digital abstraction | amplifiers | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (MIT) 2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes in existing and future power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable resources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, hybrids, catalysis, supercritical and combined cycles, photovoltaics, etc. The course also deals with different forms of energy storage and transmission, and optimal source utilization This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes in existing and future power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable resources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, hybrids, catalysis, supercritical and combined cycles, photovoltaics, etc. The course also deals with different forms of energy storage and transmission, and optimal source utilization

Subjects

Thermodynamics | Thermodynamics | chemistry | chemistry | flow | flow | transport processes | transport processes | energy systems | energy systems | energy conversion in thermomechanical | thermochemical | electrochemical | energy conversion in thermomechanical | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | and photoelectric processes | power and transportation systems | power and transportation systems | efficiency | efficiency | environmental impact | environmental impact | performance | performance | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | hydrogen resources | hydrogen resources | nuclear resources | nuclear resources | renewable resources | renewable resources | fuel reforming | fuel reforming | hydrogen and synthetic fuel production | hydrogen and synthetic fuel production | fuel cells and batteries | fuel cells and batteries | combustion | combustion | hybrids | hybrids | catalysis | catalysis | supercritical and combined cycles | supercritical and combined cycles | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | energy storage and transmission | energy storage and transmission | Optimal source utilization | Optimal source utilization | fuel-life cycle analysis. | fuel-life cycle analysis. | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | 2.62 | 2.62 | 10.392 | 10.392 | 22.40 | 22.40

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy. This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT) 10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT)

Description

10.626 introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics. 10.626 introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics.

Subjects

energy | energy | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy storage | electrochemical energy storage | transport phenomena | transport phenomena | diffuse charge | diffuse charge | Faradaic reactions | Faradaic reactions | statistical thermodynamics | statistical thermodynamics | phase transformations | phase transformations | rechargeable batteries | rechargeable batteries | fuel cells | fuel cells | supercapacitors | supercapacitors | solar cells | solar cells | desalination | desalination | electrokinetic energy conversion | electrokinetic energy conversion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | digital abstraction | amplifiers | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT) 6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective

Subjects

clean energy | clean energy | energy sources | energy sources | energy storage | energy storage | energy consumption | energy consumption | photovoltaic | photovoltaic | piezoelectric | piezoelectric | thermoelectric | thermoelectric | LED | LED | light emitting diode | light emitting diode | organic LED | organic LED | analytical biology | analytical biology | analytical chemistry | analytical chemistry | microfluidics | microfluidics | spectrometer | spectrometer | energy efficiency | energy efficiency

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT) 10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT)

Description

This course introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics. This course introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics.

Subjects

energy | energy | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy storage | electrochemical energy storage | transport phenomena | transport phenomena | diffuse charge | diffuse charge | Faradaic reactions | Faradaic reactions | statistical thermodynamics | statistical thermodynamics | phase transformations | phase transformations | rechargeable batteries | rechargeable batteries | fuel cells | fuel cells | supercapacitors | supercapacitors | solar cells | solar cells | desalination | desalination | electrokinetic energy conversion | electrokinetic energy conversion

License

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10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT) 10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT)

Description

10.626 introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics. 10.626 introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics.

Subjects

energy | energy | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy storage | electrochemical energy storage | transport phenomena | transport phenomena | diffuse charge | diffuse charge | Faradaic reactions | Faradaic reactions | statistical thermodynamics | statistical thermodynamics | phase transformations | phase transformations | rechargeable batteries | rechargeable batteries | fuel cells | fuel cells | supercapacitors | supercapacitors | solar cells | solar cells | desalination | desalination | electrokinetic energy conversion | electrokinetic energy conversion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes in existing and future power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable resources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, hybrids, catalysis, supercritical and combined cycles, photovoltaics, etc. The course also deals with different forms of energy storage and transmission, and optimal source utilization

Subjects

Thermodynamics | chemistry | flow | transport processes | energy systems | energy conversion in thermomechanical | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | power and transportation systems | efficiency | environmental impact | performance | fossil fuels | hydrogen resources | nuclear resources | renewable resources | fuel reforming | hydrogen and synthetic fuel production | fuel cells and batteries | combustion | hybrids | catalysis | supercritical and combined cycles | photovoltaics | energy storage and transmission | Optimal source utilization | fuel-life cycle analysis. | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | 2.62 | 10.392 | 22.40

License

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Chemical and Environmental Behaviour of Materials: Batteries

Description

This animation demonstrates electron flow in a Daniell cell. From TLP: Batteries

Subjects

batteries | energy storage | thermodynamics | electrochemistry | Daniell cell | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Flywheels : an alternative energy storage method : presentation transcript

Description

This open educational resource was released through the Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre Open Engineering Resources Pilot project. The project was funded by HEFCE and the JISC/HE Academy UKOER programme.

Subjects

ukoer | engscoer | cc-by | leicester college | leicester college tech | leicestercollegeoer | engineering department | education | higher education | learning | kinetic | battery | energy | rotation | nqf l4 | mechanical principals | energy storage | flywheels | edexcel hn unit | kinetic battery | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Chemical and Environmental Behaviour of Materials: Batteries

Description

This animation demonstrates electron flow in a Daniell cell. From TLP: Batteries

Subjects

batteries | energy storage | thermodynamics | electrochemistry | daniell cell | doitpoms | university of cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT)

Description

10.626 introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics.

Subjects

energy | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy storage | transport phenomena | diffuse charge | Faradaic reactions | statistical thermodynamics | phase transformations | rechargeable batteries | fuel cells | supercapacitors | solar cells | desalination | electrokinetic energy conversion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | solar energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | thermal energy | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | climate change | energy storage | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

circuit | electronic | abstraction | lumped circuit | digital | amplifier | differential equations | time behavior | energy storage | semiconductor diode | field-effect | field-effect transistor | resistor | source | inductor | capacitor | diode | series-parallel reduction | voltage | current divider | node method | linearity | superposition | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | power flow | Boolean algebra | binary signal | MOSFET | noise margin | singularity functions | sinusoidal-steady-state | impedance | frequency response curves | operational amplifier | Op-Amp | negative feedback | positive feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT)

Description

Parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology.

Subjects

nanotechnology | nanostructure | energy | energy transport | energy storage | energy carriers | quantum mechanics | quantum physics | thermoelectrics | semiconductor physics | solar cells | waves and particles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes in existing and future power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable resources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, hybrids, catalysis, supercritical and combined cycles, photovoltaics, etc. The course also deals with different forms of energy storage and transmission, and optimal source utilization

Subjects

Thermodynamics | chemistry | flow | transport processes | energy systems | energy conversion in thermomechanical | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | power and transportation systems | efficiency | environmental impact | performance | fossil fuels | hydrogen resources | nuclear resources | renewable resources | fuel reforming | hydrogen and synthetic fuel production | fuel cells and batteries | combustion | hybrids | catalysis | supercritical and combined cycles | photovoltaics | energy storage and transmission | Optimal source utilization | fuel-life cycle analysis. | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | 2.62 | 10.392 | 22.40

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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