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7.345 Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases (MIT) 7.345 Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases (MIT)

Description

How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker’s yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. T How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker’s yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. T

Subjects

human disease | human disease | yeast | yeast | nematodes | nematodes | fruit flies | fruit flies | zebrafish | zebrafish | mice | mice | rats | rats | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Fragile X syndrome | Fragile X syndrome | deafness | deafness | wound healing | wound healing | experimental organisms | experimental organisms | genetic models | genetic models | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Drosophila melanogaster | Drosophila melanogaster

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.345 Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases (MIT)

Description

How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker’s yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. T

Subjects

human disease | yeast | nematodes | fruit flies | zebrafish | mice | rats | Parkinson's disease | Fragile X syndrome | deafness | wound healing | experimental organisms | genetic models | Huntington's disease | Drosophila melanogaster

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata