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18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT) 18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.

Subjects

Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite differences | finite elements | finite elements | spectral method | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | Complex variables and applications | Complex variables and applications | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | linear programming | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite elements | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite elements | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | Optimization: network flows | linear programming

License

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3.021J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (MIT) 3.021J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (MIT)

Description

This course explores the basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. We'll use techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods are used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations. This course explores the basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. We'll use techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods are used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations.

Subjects

computer modeling | computer modeling | discrete particle system | discrete particle system | continuum | continuum | continuum field | continuum field | statistical sampling | statistical sampling | data analysis | data analysis | visualization | visualization | quantum | quantum | quantum method | quantum method | chemical | chemical | molecular dynamics | molecular dynamics | Monte Carlo | Monte Carlo | mesoscale | mesoscale | continuum method | continuum method | computational physics | computational physics | chemistry | chemistry | mechanics | mechanics | materials science | materials science | biology | biology | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | heat | heat | fractal | fractal | evolution | evolution | melting | melting | gas | gas | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | FEM | FEM | finite element | finite element

License

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2.093 Computer Methods in Dynamics (MIT) 2.093 Computer Methods in Dynamics (MIT)

Description

Formulation of finite element methods for analysis of dynamic problems in solids, structures, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Computer calculation of matrices and numerical solution of equilibrium equations by direct integration and mode superposition. Effective eigensolution techniques for calculation of frequencies and mode shapes. Digital computer coding techniques and use of an existing general purpose finite element analysis program. Modeling of problems and interpretation of numerical results. Formulation of finite element methods for analysis of dynamic problems in solids, structures, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Computer calculation of matrices and numerical solution of equilibrium equations by direct integration and mode superposition. Effective eigensolution techniques for calculation of frequencies and mode shapes. Digital computer coding techniques and use of an existing general purpose finite element analysis program. Modeling of problems and interpretation of numerical results.

Subjects

finite element methods | | finite element methods | | solids | | solids | | structures | | structures | | fluid mechanics | | fluid mechanics | | heat transfer | | heat transfer | | equilibrium equations | | equilibrium equations | | direct integration | | direct integration | | mode superposition | | mode superposition | | eigensolution techniques | | eigensolution techniques | | frequencies | | frequencies | | mode shapes. | mode shapes.

License

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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT) 2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course. This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | linear static analysis | solids | solids | structures | structures | nonlinear static analysis | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | heat transfer | fluid flows | fluid flows | finite element methods | finite element methods | ADINA | ADINA | student work | student work | beams | beams | plates | plates | shells | shells | displacement | displacement | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | radiation | radiation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids | acoustic fluids

License

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22.00J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (MIT) 22.00J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the basic concepts of computer modeling in science and engineering using discrete particle systems and continuum fields. It covers techniques and software for statistical sampling, simulation, data analysis and visualization, and uses statistical, quantum chemical, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, mesoscale and continuum methods to study fundamental physical phenomena encountered in the fields of computational physics, chemistry, mechanics, materials science, biology, and applied mathematics. Applications are drawn from a range of disciplines to build a broad-based understanding of complex structures and interactions in problems where simulation is on equal footing with theory and experiment. A term project allows development of individual interests. Students are mentor This course surveys the basic concepts of computer modeling in science and engineering using discrete particle systems and continuum fields. It covers techniques and software for statistical sampling, simulation, data analysis and visualization, and uses statistical, quantum chemical, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, mesoscale and continuum methods to study fundamental physical phenomena encountered in the fields of computational physics, chemistry, mechanics, materials science, biology, and applied mathematics. Applications are drawn from a range of disciplines to build a broad-based understanding of complex structures and interactions in problems where simulation is on equal footing with theory and experiment. A term project allows development of individual interests. Students are mentor

Subjects

computer modeling | computer modeling | discrete particle system | discrete particle system | continuum | continuum | continuum field | continuum field | statistical sampling | statistical sampling | data analysis | data analysis | visualization | visualization | quantum | quantum | quantum method | quantum method | chemical | chemical | molecular dynamics | molecular dynamics | Monte Carlo | Monte Carlo | mesoscale | mesoscale | continuum method | continuum method | computational physics | computational physics | chemistry | chemistry | mechanics | mechanics | materials science | materials science | biology; applied mathematics | biology; applied mathematics | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | heat | heat | fractal | fractal | evolution | evolution | melting | melting | gas | gas | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | FEM | FEM | finite element | finite element | biology | biology | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | 1.021 | 1.021 | 2.030 | 2.030 | 3.021 | 3.021 | 10.333 | 10.333 | 18.361 | 18.361 | HST.588 | HST.588 | 22.00 | 22.00

License

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Design (MIT) Design (MIT)

Description

This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage, This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage,

Subjects

ships | ships | offshore structures | offshore structures | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | Hydrostatic loading | Hydrostatic loading | shear load | shear load | bending moment | bending moment | ship structural design concepts | ship structural design concepts | superstructures | superstructures | primary strength | primary strength | transverse shear stresses | transverse shear stresses | torsional strength | torsional strength | Failure mechanisms | Failure mechanisms | design limit states | design limit states | plastic analysis | plastic analysis | Matrix stiffness | Matrix stiffness | grillage | grillage | finite element analysis | finite element analysis | 2.082 | 2.082

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT) 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m and .mat files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m and .mat files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

numerical integration | numerical integration | ODEs | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | finite element | finite element | discretization | discretization | PDEs | PDEs | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | probabilistic methods | optimization | optimization | omputational methods | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | aerospace engineering | computational methods | computational methods

License

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16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid protyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline.AcknowledgmentsThis course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Class of '72 Fund for Educationa This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid protyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline.AcknowledgmentsThis course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Class of '72 Fund for Educationa

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO

License

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18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT) 18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.

Subjects

Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite differences | finite elements | finite elements | spectral method | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | Complex variables and applications | Complex variables and applications | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | linear programming

License

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas. This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation | Japan | Japan | politics | politics | policy | policy | contemporary Japan | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | electoral politics | interest group politics | interest group politics | party politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | social policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | defense policy | defense policy | energy policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | trade policy | trade policy

License

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RES.2-002 Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures (MIT) RES.2-002 Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Finite element analysis is now widely used for solving complex static and dynamic problems encountered in engineering and the sciences. In these two video courses, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, teaches the basic principles used for effective finite element analysis, describes the general assumptions, and discusses the implementation of finite element procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses. These videos were produced in 1982 and 1986 by the MIT Center for Advanced Engineering Study. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Finite element analysis is now widely used for solving complex static and dynamic problems encountered in engineering and the sciences. In these two video courses, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, teaches the basic principles used for effective finite element analysis, describes the general assumptions, and discusses the implementation of finite element procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses. These videos were produced in 1982 and 1986 by the MIT Center for Advanced Engineering Study.

Subjects

finite element method | finite element method | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | linear analysis | linear analysis | nonlinear analysis | nonlinear analysis | computer modeling | computer modeling | engineering design | engineering design | solids | solids | structures | structures | wave propagation | wave propagation | vibration | vibration | collapse | collapse | buckling | buckling | Lagrangian formulation | Lagrangian formulation | truss | truss | beam | beam | plate | plate | shell | shell | elastic materials | elastic materials | plastic materials | plastic materials | creep | creep | ADINA | ADINA | numerical integration methods | numerical integration methods | mode superposition | mode superposition

License

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16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching,

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO

License

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16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teachin Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teachin

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO | structural testing | structural testing

License

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1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT) 1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT)

Description

This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J. This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J.

Subjects

modern software development | modern software development | engineering and information technology | engineering and information technology | component-based software | component-based software | C# | C# | .NET | .NET | data structures | data structures | algorithms for modeling | algorithms for modeling | analysis | analysis | visualization | visualization | basic problem-solving techniques | basic problem-solving techniques | web services | web services | management and maintenance of software | management and maintenance of software | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | algorithms | algorithms | numerical simulation techniques | numerical simulation techniques | image processing | image processing | computational geometry | computational geometry | finite element methods | finite element methods | network methods | network methods | e-business applications | e-business applications | classes | classes | objects | objects | inheritance | inheritance | virtual functions | virtual functions | abstract classes | abstract classes | polymorphism | polymorphism | Java applications | Java applications | applets | applets | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Graphics | Graphics | Threads | Threads | Java | Java | C++ | C++ | information technology | information technology | engineering | engineering | modeling algorithms | modeling algorithms | basic problem-solving | basic problem-solving | software management | software management | software maintenance | software maintenance | searching algorithms | searching algorithms | numerical simulation | numerical simulation | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | 13.470J | 13.470J | 1.124 | 1.124 | 2.159 | 2.159 | 13.470 | 13.470

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course will provide students with an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®. Topics covered throughout the course will include: errors, condition numbers and roots of equations; Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis, and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Subject includes a final research project. This course will provide students with an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®. Topics covered throughout the course will include: errors, condition numbers and roots of equations; Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis, and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Subject includes a final research project.

Subjects

errors | errors | condition numbers and roots of equations | condition numbers and roots of equations | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | finite differences for elliptic | finite differences for elliptic | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | and stability | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | and stability | high-order and compact finite-differences | high-order and compact finite-differences | finite volume methods | finite volume methods | time marching methods | time marching methods | Navier-Stokes solvers | Navier-Stokes solvers | grid generation | grid generation | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite element methods | finite element methods | spectral methods | spectral methods | boundary element and panel methods | boundary element and panel methods | turbulent flows | turbulent flows | boundary layers | boundary layers | Lagrangian Coherent Structures | Lagrangian Coherent Structures

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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids II (MIT) 2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids II (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course. This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | linear static analysis | solids | solids | structures | structures | nonlinear static analysis | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | heat transfer | fluid flows | fluid flows | finite element methods | finite element methods | ADINA | ADINA | student work | student work | beams | beams | plates | plates | shells | shells | displacement | displacement | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | radiation | radiation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids | acoustic fluids

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2.092 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids I (MIT) 2.092 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids I (MIT)

Description

This course introduces finite element methods for the analysis of solid, structural, fluid, field, and heat transfer problems. Steady-state, transient, and dynamic conditions are considered. Finite element methods and solution procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses are presented using largely physical arguments. The homework and a term project (for graduate students) involve use of the general purpose finite element analysis program ADINA. Applications include finite element analyses, modeling of problems, and interpretation of numerical results. This course introduces finite element methods for the analysis of solid, structural, fluid, field, and heat transfer problems. Steady-state, transient, and dynamic conditions are considered. Finite element methods and solution procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses are presented using largely physical arguments. The homework and a term project (for graduate students) involve use of the general purpose finite element analysis program ADINA. Applications include finite element analyses, modeling of problems, and interpretation of numerical results.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation

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Design (13.122) (MIT) Design (13.122) (MIT)

Description

This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage, This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage,

Subjects

ships | ships | offshore structures | offshore structures | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | Hydrostatic loading | Hydrostatic loading | shear load | shear load | bending moment | bending moment | ship structural design concepts | ship structural design concepts | superstructures | superstructures | primary strength | primary strength | transverse shear stresses | transverse shear stresses | torsional strength | torsional strength | Failure mechanisms | Failure mechanisms | design limit states | design limit states | plastic analysis | plastic analysis | Matrix stiffness | Matrix stiffness | grillage | grillage | finite element analysis | finite element analysis

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10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT) 10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed. The examples will use MATLAB®. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Robert Ashcraft, Sandeep Sharma, David Weingeist, and Nikolay Zaborenko for their work in preparing materials for this course site. Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed. The examples will use MATLAB®. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Robert Ashcraft, Sandeep Sharma, David Weingeist, and Nikolay Zaborenko for their work in preparing materials for this course site.

Subjects

Matlab | Matlab | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | linear systems | linear systems | scientific computing | scientific computing | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | probability theory | probability theory | use of probability theory in physical modeling | use of probability theory in physical modeling | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | finite difference techniques | finite difference techniques | finite element techniques | finite element techniques | converting partial differential equations | converting partial differential equations | Navier-Stokes equations | Navier-Stokes equations

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10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT) 10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the use of modern computational and mathematical techniques in chemical engineering. Starting from a discussion of linear systems as the basic computational unit in scientific computing, methods for solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and differential-algebraic (DAE) systems are presented. Probability theory and its use in physical modeling is covered, as is the statistical analysis of data and parameter estimation. The finite difference and finite element techniques are presented for converting the partial differential equations obtained from transport phenomena to DAE systems. The use of these techniques will be demonstrated throughout the course in the MATLAB® computing environment. This course focuses on the use of modern computational and mathematical techniques in chemical engineering. Starting from a discussion of linear systems as the basic computational unit in scientific computing, methods for solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and differential-algebraic (DAE) systems are presented. Probability theory and its use in physical modeling is covered, as is the statistical analysis of data and parameter estimation. The finite difference and finite element techniques are presented for converting the partial differential equations obtained from transport phenomena to DAE systems. The use of these techniques will be demonstrated throughout the course in the MATLAB® computing environment.

Subjects

Matlab | Matlab | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | linear systems | linear systems | scientific computing | scientific computing | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | probability theory | probability theory | use of probability theory in physical modeling | use of probability theory in physical modeling | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | finite difference techniques | finite difference techniques | finite element techniques | finite element techniques | converting partial differential equations | converting partial differential equations

License

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16.682 Prototyping Avionics (MIT) 16.682 Prototyping Avionics (MIT)

Description

In the past building prototypes of electronic components for new projects/products was limited to using protoboards and wirewrap. Manufacturing a printed-circuit-board was limited to final production, where mistakes in the implementation meant physically cutting traces on the board and adding wire jumpers - the final products would have these fixes on them! Today that is no longer the case, while you will still cut traces and use jumpers when debugging a board, manufacturing a new final version without the errors is a simple and relatively inexpensive task. For that matter, manufacturing a prototype printed circuit board which you know is likely to have errors but which will get the design substantially closer to the final product than a protoboard setup is not only possible, but desirable In the past building prototypes of electronic components for new projects/products was limited to using protoboards and wirewrap. Manufacturing a printed-circuit-board was limited to final production, where mistakes in the implementation meant physically cutting traces on the board and adding wire jumpers - the final products would have these fixes on them! Today that is no longer the case, while you will still cut traces and use jumpers when debugging a board, manufacturing a new final version without the errors is a simple and relatively inexpensive task. For that matter, manufacturing a prototype printed circuit board which you know is likely to have errors but which will get the design substantially closer to the final product than a protoboard setup is not only possible, but desirable

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT) 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints. This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.

Subjects

numerical integration | numerical integration | ODEs | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | finite element | finite element | discretization | discretization | PDEs | PDEs | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | probabilistic methods | optimization | optimization | omputational methods | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | aerospace engineering | computational methods | computational methods

License

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16.920J Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (SMA 5212) (MIT) 16.920J Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (SMA 5212) (MIT)

Description

A presentation of the fundamentals of modern numerical techniques for a wide range of linear and nonlinear elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic partial differential equations and integral equations central to a wide variety of applications in science, engineering, and other fields. Topics include: Mathematical Formulations; Finite Difference and Finite Volume Discretizations; Finite Element Discretizations; Boundary Element Discretizations; Direct and Iterative Solution Methods.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5212 (Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations). A presentation of the fundamentals of modern numerical techniques for a wide range of linear and nonlinear elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic partial differential equations and integral equations central to a wide variety of applications in science, engineering, and other fields. Topics include: Mathematical Formulations; Finite Difference and Finite Volume Discretizations; Finite Element Discretizations; Boundary Element Discretizations; Direct and Iterative Solution Methods.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5212 (Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations).

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | differential equations | differential equations | linear | linear | nonlinear | nonlinear | elliptic | elliptic | parabolic | parabolic | hyperbolic | hyperbolic | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | integral equations | integral equations | mathematical formulations | mathematical formulations | mathematics | mathematics | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | discretisation | discretisation | finite element | finite element | boundary element | boundary element | iteration | iteration | 16.920 | 16.920 | 2.097 | 2.097 | 6.339 | 6.339

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18.336 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (MIT) 18.336 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods. This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.

Subjects

advection equation | advection equation | heat equation | heat equation | wave equation | wave equation | Airy equation | Airy equation | convection-diffusion problems | convection-diffusion problems | KdV equation | KdV equation | hyperbolic conservation laws | hyperbolic conservation laws | Poisson equation | Poisson equation | Stokes problem | Stokes problem | Navier-Stokes equations | Navier-Stokes equations | interface problems | interface problems | consistency | consistency | stability | stability | convergence | convergence | Lax equivalence theorem | Lax equivalence theorem | error analysis | error analysis | Fourier approaches | Fourier approaches | staggered grids | staggered grids | shocks | shocks | front propagation | front propagation | preconditioning | preconditioning | multigrid | multigrid | Krylov spaces | Krylov spaces | saddle point problems | saddle point problems | finite differences | finite differences | finite volumes | finite volumes | finite elements | finite elements | ENO/WENO | ENO/WENO | spectral methods | spectral methods | projection approaches for incompressible ows | projection approaches for incompressible ows | level set methods | level set methods | particle methods | particle methods | direct and iterative methods | direct and iterative methods

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT) 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints. This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.

Subjects

numerical integration | numerical integration | ODEs | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | finite element | finite element | discretization | discretization | PDEs | PDEs | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | probabilistic methods | optimization | optimization | omputational methods | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | aerospace engineering | computational methods | computational methods

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