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6.004 Computation Structures (MIT) 6.004 Computation Structures (MIT)

Description

6.004 offers an introduction to the engineering of digital systems. Starting with MOS transistors, the course develops a series of building blocks - logic gates, combinational and sequential circuits, finite-state machines, computers and finally complete systems. Both hardware and software mechanisms are explored through a series of design examples.6.004 is required material for any EECS undergraduate who wants to understand (and ultimately design) digital systems. A good grasp of the material is essential for later courses in digital design, computer architecture and systems. Before taking 6.004, students should feel comfortable using computers; a rudimentary knowledge of programming language concepts (6.001) and electrical fundamentals (6.002) is assumed. 6.004 offers an introduction to the engineering of digital systems. Starting with MOS transistors, the course develops a series of building blocks - logic gates, combinational and sequential circuits, finite-state machines, computers and finally complete systems. Both hardware and software mechanisms are explored through a series of design examples.6.004 is required material for any EECS undergraduate who wants to understand (and ultimately design) digital systems. A good grasp of the material is essential for later courses in digital design, computer architecture and systems. Before taking 6.004, students should feel comfortable using computers; a rudimentary knowledge of programming language concepts (6.001) and electrical fundamentals (6.002) is assumed.

Subjects

computation | computation | computation structure | computation structure | primitives | primitives | gates | gates | nstructions | nstructions | procedures | procedures | processes | processes | concurrency | concurrency | instruction set design | instruction set design | software structure | software structure | digital system | digital system | MOS transistor | MOS transistor | logic gate | logic gate | combinational circuit | combinational circuit | sequential circuit | | sequential circuit | | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | sequential circuit | sequential circuit | computer architecture | computer architecture | programming | programming | RISC processor | RISC processor | instructions | instructions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT) 6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 covers digital design topics such as digital logic, flipflops, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, and finite-state machines. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 covers digital design topics such as digital logic, flipflops, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, and finite-state machines. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | digital systems laboratory | laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | digital logic | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | flip-flops | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | FSM | FSM | microprogrammed systems | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PAL | PROM | PROM | VHDL | VHDL | digital circuit design | digital circuit design | FPGA | FPGA | counters | counters | timing | timing | synchronization | synchronization | digital filters | digital filters | wireless communications | wireless communications | verilog | verilog | combinational logic | combinational logic | simple sequential circuits | simple sequential circuits | memories | memories | configurable logic | configurable logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.262 Discrete Stochastic Processes (MIT) 6.262 Discrete Stochastic Processes (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Discrete stochastic processes are essentially probabilistic systems that evolve in time via random changes occurring at discrete fixed or random intervals. This course aims to help students acquire both the mathematical principles and the intuition necessary to create, analyze, and understand insightful models for a broad range of these processes. The range of areas for which discrete stochastic-process models are useful is constantly expanding, and includes many applications in engineering, physics, biology, operations research and finance. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Discrete stochastic processes are essentially probabilistic systems that evolve in time via random changes occurring at discrete fixed or random intervals. This course aims to help students acquire both the mathematical principles and the intuition necessary to create, analyze, and understand insightful models for a broad range of these processes. The range of areas for which discrete stochastic-process models are useful is constantly expanding, and includes many applications in engineering, physics, biology, operations research and finance.

Subjects

probability | probability | Poisson processes | Poisson processes | finite-state Markov chains | finite-state Markov chains | renewal processes | renewal processes | countable-state Markov chains | countable-state Markov chains | Markov processes | Markov processes | countable state spaces | countable state spaces | random walks | random walks | large deviations | large deviations | martingales | martingales

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT) 6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT)

Description

The course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages. This includes systems with finite or infinite state spaces, as well as perfectly or imperfectly observed systems. We will also discuss approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations. The course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages. This includes systems with finite or infinite state spaces, as well as perfectly or imperfectly observed systems. We will also discuss approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations.

Subjects

dynamic programming | dynamic programming | stochastic control | stochastic control | algorithms | algorithms | finite-state | finite-state | continuous-time | continuous-time | imperfect state information | imperfect state information | suboptimal control | suboptimal control | finite horizon | finite horizon | infinite horizon | infinite horizon | discounted problems | discounted problems | stochastic shortest path | stochastic shortest path | approximate dynamic programming | approximate dynamic programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.004 Computation Structures (MIT) 6.004 Computation Structures (MIT)

Description

6.004 offers an introduction to the engineering of digital systems. Starting with MOS transistors, the course develops a series of building blocks — logic gates, combinational and sequential circuits, finite-state machines, computers and finally complete systems. Both hardware and software mechanisms are explored through a series of design examples. 6.004 is required material for any EECS undergraduate who wants to understand (and ultimately design) digital systems. A good grasp of the material is essential for later courses in digital design, computer architecture and systems. The problem sets and lab exercises are intended to give students "hands-on" experience in designing digital systems; each student completes a gate-level design for a reduced instruction set computer 6.004 offers an introduction to the engineering of digital systems. Starting with MOS transistors, the course develops a series of building blocks — logic gates, combinational and sequential circuits, finite-state machines, computers and finally complete systems. Both hardware and software mechanisms are explored through a series of design examples. 6.004 is required material for any EECS undergraduate who wants to understand (and ultimately design) digital systems. A good grasp of the material is essential for later courses in digital design, computer architecture and systems. The problem sets and lab exercises are intended to give students "hands-on" experience in designing digital systems; each student completes a gate-level design for a reduced instruction set computer

Subjects

computation | computation | computation structure | computation structure | primitives | primitives | gates | gates | instructions | instructions | procedures | procedures | processes | processes | concurrency | concurrency | instruction set design | instruction set design | software structure | software structure | digital system | digital system | MOS transistor | MOS transistor | logic gate | logic gate | combinational circuit | combinational circuit | sequential circuit | sequential circuit | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | computer architecture | computer architecture | programming | programming | RISC processor | RISC processor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT) 6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 is reputed to be one of the most demanding classes at MIT, exhausting many students' time and creativity. The course covers digital design topics such as digital logic, sequential building blocks, finite-state machines, FPGAs, timing and synchronization. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs on state-of-the-art FPGA. 6.111 is reputed to be one of the most demanding classes at MIT, exhausting many students' time and creativity. The course covers digital design topics such as digital logic, sequential building blocks, finite-state machines, FPGAs, timing and synchronization. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs on state-of-the-art FPGA.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | digital systems laboratory | laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | digital logic | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | flip-flops | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | FSM | FSM | microprogrammed systems | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PAL | PROM | PROM | VHDL | VHDL | digital circuit design | digital circuit design | FPGA | FPGA | counters | counters | timing | timing | synchronization | synchronization | digital filters | digital filters | wireless communications | wireless communications | verilog | verilog

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT) 6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 consists of lectures and labs on digital logic, flipflops, PALs, counters, timing, synchronization, finite-state machines, and microprogrammed systems. Students are expected to design and implement a final project of their choice: games, music, digital filters, graphics, etc. The course requires extensive use of VHDL for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 is worth 12 Engineering Design Points. 6.111 consists of lectures and labs on digital logic, flipflops, PALs, counters, timing, synchronization, finite-state machines, and microprogrammed systems. Students are expected to design and implement a final project of their choice: games, music, digital filters, graphics, etc. The course requires extensive use of VHDL for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | digital systems laboratory | laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | digital logic | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | flip-flops | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | FSM | FSM | microprogrammed systems | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PAL | PROM | PROM | VHDL | VHDL | digital circuit design | digital circuit design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT) 6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. The course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages. This includes systems with finite or infinite state spaces, as well as perfectly or imperfectly observed systems. We will also discuss approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. The course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages. This includes systems with finite or infinite state spaces, as well as perfectly or imperfectly observed systems. We will also discuss approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations.

Subjects

dynamic programming | dynamic programming | stochastic control | stochastic control | algorithms | algorithms | finite-state | finite-state | continuous-time | continuous-time | imperfect state information | imperfect state information | suboptimal control | suboptimal control | finite horizon | finite horizon | infinite horizon | infinite horizon | discounted problems | discounted problems | stochastic shortest path | stochastic shortest path | approximate dynamic programming | approximate dynamic programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.004 Computation Structures (MIT)

Description

6.004 offers an introduction to the engineering of digital systems. Starting with MOS transistors, the course develops a series of building blocks - logic gates, combinational and sequential circuits, finite-state machines, computers and finally complete systems. Both hardware and software mechanisms are explored through a series of design examples.6.004 is required material for any EECS undergraduate who wants to understand (and ultimately design) digital systems. A good grasp of the material is essential for later courses in digital design, computer architecture and systems. Before taking 6.004, students should feel comfortable using computers; a rudimentary knowledge of programming language concepts (6.001) and electrical fundamentals (6.002) is assumed.

Subjects

computation | computation structure | primitives | gates | nstructions | procedures | processes | concurrency | instruction set design | software structure | digital system | MOS transistor | logic gate | combinational circuit | sequential circuit | | finite-state machines | sequential circuit | computer architecture | programming | RISC processor | instructions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 covers digital design topics such as digital logic, flipflops, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, and finite-state machines. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | finite-state machines | FSM | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PROM | VHDL | digital circuit design | FPGA | counters | timing | synchronization | digital filters | wireless communications | verilog | combinational logic | simple sequential circuits | memories | configurable logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT)

Description

The course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages. This includes systems with finite or infinite state spaces, as well as perfectly or imperfectly observed systems. We will also discuss approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations.

Subjects

dynamic programming | stochastic control | algorithms | finite-state | continuous-time | imperfect state information | suboptimal control | finite horizon | infinite horizon | discounted problems | stochastic shortest path | approximate dynamic programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.262 Discrete Stochastic Processes (MIT)

Description

Discrete stochastic processes are essentially probabilistic systems that evolve in time via random changes occurring at discrete fixed or random intervals. This course aims to help students acquire both the mathematical principles and the intuition necessary to create, analyze, and understand insightful models for a broad range of these processes. The range of areas for which discrete stochastic-process models are useful is constantly expanding, and includes many applications in engineering, physics, biology, operations research and finance.

Subjects

probability | Poisson processes | finite-state Markov chains | renewal processes | countable-state Markov chains | Markov processes | countable state spaces | random walks | large deviations | martingales

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.004 Computation Structures (MIT)

Description

6.004 offers an introduction to the engineering of digital systems. Starting with MOS transistors, the course develops a series of building blocks — logic gates, combinational and sequential circuits, finite-state machines, computers and finally complete systems. Both hardware and software mechanisms are explored through a series of design examples. 6.004 is required material for any EECS undergraduate who wants to understand (and ultimately design) digital systems. A good grasp of the material is essential for later courses in digital design, computer architecture and systems. The problem sets and lab exercises are intended to give students "hands-on" experience in designing digital systems; each student completes a gate-level design for a reduced instruction set computer

Subjects

computation | computation structure | primitives | gates | instructions | procedures | processes | concurrency | instruction set design | software structure | digital system | MOS transistor | logic gate | combinational circuit | sequential circuit | finite-state machines | computer architecture | programming | RISC processor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 is reputed to be one of the most demanding classes at MIT, exhausting many students' time and creativity. The course covers digital design topics such as digital logic, sequential building blocks, finite-state machines, FPGAs, timing and synchronization. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs on state-of-the-art FPGA.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | finite-state machines | FSM | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PROM | VHDL | digital circuit design | FPGA | counters | timing | synchronization | digital filters | wireless communications | verilog

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 consists of lectures and labs on digital logic, flipflops, PALs, counters, timing, synchronization, finite-state machines, and microprogrammed systems. Students are expected to design and implement a final project of their choice: games, music, digital filters, graphics, etc. The course requires extensive use of VHDL for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | finite-state machines | FSM | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PROM | VHDL | digital circuit design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control (MIT)

Description

The course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages. This includes systems with finite or infinite state spaces, as well as perfectly or imperfectly observed systems. We will also discuss approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations.

Subjects

dynamic programming | stochastic control | algorithms | finite-state | continuous-time | imperfect state information | suboptimal control | finite horizon | infinite horizon | discounted problems | stochastic shortest path | approximate dynamic programming

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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