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14.20 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (MIT) 14.20 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This is a course in industrial organization, the study of firms in markets. Industrial organization focuses on firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, which appear to be far more common than the perfectly competitive markets that were the focus of your basic microeconomics course. This field analyzes the acquisition and use of market power by firms, strategic interactions among firms, and the role of government competition policy. We will approach this subject from both theoretical and applied perspectives. This is a course in industrial organization, the study of firms in markets. Industrial organization focuses on firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, which appear to be far more common than the perfectly competitive markets that were the focus of your basic microeconomics course. This field analyzes the acquisition and use of market power by firms, strategic interactions among firms, and the role of government competition policy. We will approach this subject from both theoretical and applied perspectives.

Subjects

government | government | market power | market power | strategy | strategy | economics | economics | game theory | game theory | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | pricing | pricing | spatial model | spatial model | public policy | public policy | competitive markets | competitive markets | firm behavior | firm behavior | industrial organization | industrial organization | imperfectly competitive markets | imperfectly competitive markets | firm acquisition | firm acquisition | government competition policy | government competition policy | market power firms | market power firms | dynamic games | dynamic games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests. Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests.

Subjects

labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.486J Economic Institutions and Growth Policy Analysis (MIT) 11.486J Economic Institutions and Growth Policy Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course is designed for students particularly concerned with the practical problems of operating in large formal organizations, either from an operational or a research perspective. It will focus, as the title suggests, upon different forms of economic organizations and institutions in advanced and developing industrial societies and the theories (and theoretical perspectives) which might help us to understand them. This course is designed for students particularly concerned with the practical problems of operating in large formal organizations, either from an operational or a research perspective. It will focus, as the title suggests, upon different forms of economic organizations and institutions in advanced and developing industrial societies and the theories (and theoretical perspectives) which might help us to understand them.

Subjects

economics | economics | economic institutions | economic institutions | growth policy analysis | growth policy analysis | division of labor | division of labor | corporations | corporations | markets | markets | hierarchy | hierarchy | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | street level bureaucracy | street level bureaucracy | firm structure | firm structure | optimum firm structure | optimum firm structure | corporate culture | corporate culture | organizational culture | organizational culture | globalism | globalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.282 Organizational Economics (MIT) 14.282 Organizational Economics (MIT)

Description

This course in organizational economics prepares doctoral students for further study in the field. The course introduces the classic papers and some recent research. The material is organized into the following modules: boundaries of the firm, employment in organizations, decision-making in organizations, and structures and processes in organizations. Each class session covers a few leading papers. This course was joint-taught between faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The Harvard course is Economics 2670 Organizational Economics. This course in organizational economics prepares doctoral students for further study in the field. The course introduces the classic papers and some recent research. The material is organized into the following modules: boundaries of the firm, employment in organizations, decision-making in organizations, and structures and processes in organizations. Each class session covers a few leading papers. This course was joint-taught between faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The Harvard course is Economics 2670 Organizational Economics.

Subjects

organizational economics | organizational economics | classic evidence | classic evidence | formal theories | formal theories | contracting between firms | contracting between firms | evidence on contracts | evidence on contracts | business cases | business cases | performance pay | performance pay | incentives | incentives | job assignment | job assignment | skill development | skill development | networks | networks | employment systems | employment systems | decision processes | decision processes | authority | authority | power | power | leadership | leadership | politics | politics | influence | influence | language | language | hierarchical models | hierarchical models | organizational structure | organizational structure | conglomerates | conglomerates | corporate strategy | corporate strategy | corporate governance | corporate governance | corporate capital | corporate capital | firm | firm | relational contracts | relational contracts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.271 Industrial Organization I (MIT) 14.271 Industrial Organization I (MIT)

Description

The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies. The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies.

Subjects

Industrial organization | theoretical models and empirical studies | Industrial organization | theoretical models and empirical studies | structure | behavior | and performance of firms and markets and core issues in antitrust | structure | behavior | and performance of firms and markets and core issues in antitrust | organization of the firm | monopoly | price discrimination | oligopoly | and auctions | organization of the firm | monopoly | price discrimination | oligopoly | and auctions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international economics | international trade | international trade | Ricardian model | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | trade theory | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | foreign investment | gravity models | gravity models | trade and growth | trade and growth | labor markets | labor markets | offshoring | offshoring | fragmentation of production | fragmentation of production | multinational firms | multinational firms | political economy | political economy | WTO | WTO | world trade organization | world trade organization | dynamic trade theory | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | technology and growth | innovation | innovation | technology transfer | technology transfer | product cycles | product cycles | tariff retaliation | tariff retaliation | regionalism | regionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.369 Seminar in Corporate Entrepreneurship (MIT) 15.369 Seminar in Corporate Entrepreneurship (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the practical challenges of making an established company entrepreneurial and examines various roles related to corporate entrepreneurship. Outside speakers complement faculty lectures. This course addresses the practical challenges of making an established company entrepreneurial and examines various roles related to corporate entrepreneurship. Outside speakers complement faculty lectures.

Subjects

entrepreneur | entrepreneur | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | corporate relations | corporate relations | large firms | large firms | corporate entrepreneurship | corporate entrepreneurship | stakeholders | stakeholders | innovation | innovation | organization | organization | transformation | transformation | profitability | profitability | disruptive technology | disruptive technology | inertia | inertia | accelerating growth | accelerating growth | new ventures | new ventures | open innovation | open innovation | research and development | research and development | new products | new products | new features | new features | ecomagination | ecomagination | clean technologies | clean technologies | internal entrepreneur | internal entrepreneur | firm strategy | firm strategy | startups | startups | venturing tools | venturing tools | venture capital | venture capital | acquisition | acquisition | act-learn-build | act-learn-build

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Royal Infirmary, Dublin City, Co. Dublin

Description

Subjects

robertfrench | williamlawrence | lawrencecollection | lawrencephotographicstudio | thelawrencephotographcollection | glassnegative | nationallibraryofireland | royalinfirmary | infirmaryroad | dublin | military | greenhouses | glasshouses | phoenixpark | malaprop | spoonerism | peoplesgarden | jamesgandon | williamgibson | irisharmyheadquarters | royalmilitaryinfirmary | militaryinfirmary | alotdonemoretodo

License

No known copyright restrictions

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14.20 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This is a course in industrial organization, the study of firms in markets. Industrial organization focuses on firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, which appear to be far more common than the perfectly competitive markets that were the focus of your basic microeconomics course. This field analyzes the acquisition and use of market power by firms, strategic interactions among firms, and the role of government competition policy. We will approach this subject from both theoretical and applied perspectives.

Subjects

government | market power | strategy | economics | game theory | monopoly | oligopoly | pricing | spatial model | public policy | competitive markets | firm behavior | industrial organization | imperfectly competitive markets | firm acquisition | government competition policy | market power firms | dynamic games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.20 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This is a course in industrial organization, the study of firms in markets. Industrial organization focuses on firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, which appear to be far more common than the perfectly competitive markets that were the focus of your basic microeconomics course. This field analyzes the acquisition and use of market power by firms, strategic interactions among firms, and the role of government competition policy. We will approach this subject from both theoretical and applied perspectives.

Subjects

government | market power | strategy | economics | game theory | monopoly | oligopoly | pricing | spatial model | public policy | competitive markets | firm behavior | industrial organization | imperfectly competitive markets | firm acquisition | government competition policy | market power firms | dynamic games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Ålhus church, 1927

Description

Subjects

norway | noreg | norge | sognogfjordane | sunnfjord | olaifauske | confirmation | pries | candidateforconfirmation | groupportrait | confirmand | ålhus | jølster | religiouscelebration | christianity | religion | youngsters | girls | boys | man

License

No known copyright restrictions

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered. This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | just society | values of liberty | values of liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | religious liberty | labor markets | labor markets | health care | health care | affirmative action | affirmative action | abortion | abortion | global justice | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.471 Public Economics I (MIT) 14.471 Public Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course is a one-semester introduction to the economic analysis of taxation. It covers both theoretical contributions, such as the theory of optimal income and commodity taxation, as well as empirical work, such as the study of how taxes affect labor supply. The course is designed to acquaint students with key questions in the economics of taxation, and to equip them to carry out their own research in this field. This course is a one-semester introduction to the economic analysis of taxation. It covers both theoretical contributions, such as the theory of optimal income and commodity taxation, as well as empirical work, such as the study of how taxes affect labor supply. The course is designed to acquaint students with key questions in the economics of taxation, and to equip them to carry out their own research in this field.

Subjects

economic analysis | economic analysis | taxation | taxation | wealth | wealth | financial policy | financial policy | income | income | investment | investment | asset | asset | political economy | political economy | labor | labor | capital | capital | public policy | public policy | theory | theory | evidence | evidence | government taxation policy | government taxation policy | tax incidence | tax incidence | optimal tax theory | optimal tax theory | labor supply | labor supply | savings | savings | corrective taxes for externalities | corrective taxes for externalities | corporate behavior | corporate behavior | tax expenditure policy | tax expenditure policy | theory of optimal income | theory of optimal income | commodity taxation | commodity taxation | calculus-based microeconomic analysis | calculus-based microeconomic analysis | duality methods | duality methods | household theory | household theory | firm theory | firm theory | growth theory | growth theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.220 International Management (MIT) 15.220 International Management (MIT)

Description

Companies today confront an increasing array of choices of markets, of locations for value adding activities, and of modes of crossing borders. This course focuses on the international dimensions of strategy and organization, and provides a framework for formulating strategies in an increasingly complex world economy, and for making those strategies work effectively. The first section of the course provides the basic frameworks for understanding competitiveness in international business at the level of the industry, location, and firm. These frameworks identify the opportunities presented in a dynamic global environment. But taking advantages of those opportunities faces enormous managerial challenges, and the second section of the course focuses on using and dee Companies today confront an increasing array of choices of markets, of locations for value adding activities, and of modes of crossing borders. This course focuses on the international dimensions of strategy and organization, and provides a framework for formulating strategies in an increasingly complex world economy, and for making those strategies work effectively. The first section of the course provides the basic frameworks for understanding competitiveness in international business at the level of the industry, location, and firm. These frameworks identify the opportunities presented in a dynamic global environment. But taking advantages of those opportunities faces enormous managerial challenges, and the second section of the course focuses on using and dee

Subjects

industry | industry | location | location | firm | firm | competitiveness | competitiveness | dynamic global environment | dynamic global environment | managerial challenges | managerial challenges | analytical tools | analytical tools

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT) 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure. This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

supreme court | supreme court | constitutional law | constitutional law | racial profiling | racial profiling | wartime | wartime | affirmative action | affirmative action | constitutionality | constitutionality | civil rights | civil rights | civil liberties | civil liberties | roe | roe | wade | wade | economic liberties | economic liberties | desegregation | desegregation | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | fundamental rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Historical Experience (MIT) Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | literature | history | history | anthropology | anthropology | film | film | cultural studies | cultural studies | Asian Americans | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | Asian immigration | ethnicity | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | racial stereotyping | media racism | media racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | glass ceiling | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | harassment | violence | violence | 21F.043J | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21H.150 | 21F.043 | 21F.043

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT) 17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT)

Description

What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more. What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | affirmative action | affirmative action | religion | religion | sexuality | sexuality | evolution | evolution | creationism | creationism | prostitution | prostitution | beauty | beauty | meaning of life | meaning of life | health care | health care | euthanasia | euthanasia | gender | gender | race | race

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT) 11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | the proper relationship between business | government | government | and the public interest | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | CIS | CIS | Asia | Asia | business | business | public interest | public interest | economic growth | economic growth | equity | equity | cities | cities | institution-building | institution-building | institutions | institutions | liberalization | liberalization | privatization | privatization | entrepreneurs | entrepreneurs | private firms | private firms | law | law | property rights | property rights

License

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international trade | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | gravity models | trade and growth | labor markets | offshoring | fragmentation of production | multinational firms | political economy | WTO | world trade organization | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | innovation | technology transfer | product cycles | tariff retaliation | regionalism

License

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14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT) 14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT)

Description

Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings. Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings.

Subjects

productivity | productivity | health | health | education | education | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | public finance | public finance | decision making | decision making | families | families | firms | firms | contracts | contracts | technology | technology | labor | labor | migration | migration | land | land | credit | credit | savings | savings | poverty | poverty | inequality | inequality | nutrition | nutrition | school choice | school choice | school vouchers | school vouchers | subsidies | subsidies | taxes | taxes | employment | employment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT) 14.662 Labor Economics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second of a two-part sequence of courses in labor economics. The course sequence is also open to qualified students in related fields and classes may be taken individually or out of sequence. This part of the sequence is principally concerned with issues relating to the determinants of the wage and salary distribution. The first half is organized around topics in wage determination, which are of particular interest for current research and policy and culminates with a focus on recent debates about the increasing dispersion of wage and salary income. The second half of the course is focused on labor market institutions and technological changes, and relates the debate about the income distribution to other major changes in the structure and texture of advanced industrial societi This is the second of a two-part sequence of courses in labor economics. The course sequence is also open to qualified students in related fields and classes may be taken individually or out of sequence. This part of the sequence is principally concerned with issues relating to the determinants of the wage and salary distribution. The first half is organized around topics in wage determination, which are of particular interest for current research and policy and culminates with a focus on recent debates about the increasing dispersion of wage and salary income. The second half of the course is focused on labor market institutions and technological changes, and relates the debate about the income distribution to other major changes in the structure and texture of advanced industrial societi

Subjects

labor | labor | economics | economics | trade unions | trade unions | wage differentials | wage differentials | international trade | international trade | wage and salary distribution | wage and salary distribution | wage determination | wage determination | increasing dispersion of wage and salary income | increasing dispersion of wage and salary income | labor market institutions | labor market institutions | technological changes | technological changes | income distribution | income distribution | United States and other advanced industrial countries | United States and other advanced industrial countries | moral hazard and agency | moral hazard and agency | Static single agent models | Static single agent models | Intrinsic motivation | Intrinsic motivation | Multiple tasks | Multiple tasks | Multiple agents | Multiple agents | Dynamic agency | Dynamic agency | Efficiency wages | Efficiency wages | Employer Wage Differentials | Employer Wage Differentials | Industry and firm size differentials | Industry and firm size differentials | Compensating differentials | Compensating differentials | Discrimination and Differentials by Race and Gender | Discrimination and Differentials by Race and Gender | Changes in the Wage Structure and Inequality | Changes in the Wage Structure and Inequality | Worker Motivation and Behavior | Worker Motivation and Behavior | Social Dimensions of the Labor Force | Social Dimensions of the Labor Force | Social class | Social class | Social capital | Social capital | Immigration | Immigration | Quasi-unions in the New Labor Market | Quasi-unions in the New Labor Market | Labor market regulations in a global economy | Labor market regulations in a global economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term. The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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