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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT) 2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course. This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | linear static analysis | solids | solids | structures | structures | nonlinear static analysis | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | heat transfer | fluid flows | fluid flows | finite element methods | finite element methods | ADINA | ADINA | student work | student work | beams | beams | plates | plates | shells | shells | displacement | displacement | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | radiation | radiation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids | acoustic fluids

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2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT) 2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates on the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact, study of fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, relevant to engine power, efficiency, and emissions, examination of design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. The project section details the Engine Laboratory project. We have aimed this course for graduate and senior undergraduate students. This course elaborates on the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact, study of fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, relevant to engine power, efficiency, and emissions, examination of design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. The project section details the Engine Laboratory project. We have aimed this course for graduate and senior undergraduate students.

Subjects

internal combustion engines | internal combustion engines | engine operation | engine operation | engine fuel requirements | engine fuel requirements | environmental impact | environmental impact | fluid flow | fluid flow | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | combustion | combustion | heat transfer and friction phenomena | heat transfer and friction phenomena | fuel properties | fuel properties | power | power | efficiency | efficiency | emissions | emissions | spark-ignition | spark-ignition | diesel | diesel | stratified-charge | stratified-charge | mixed-cycle engine. | mixed-cycle engine.

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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.03 | 16.04 | 16.04

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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT) 12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site.

Subjects

meteorology | meteorology | climate | climate | oceanography | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | Vorticity | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Ekman layers | Vortex motion | Vortex motion | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | atmospheric science | atmospheric science | physical oceanography | physical oceanography | ocean engineering | ocean engineering | oceans | oceans | fluid flow | fluid flow | conservation equations | conservation equations | vortex flows | vortex flows | circulation | circulation | Earth | Earth | rotation | rotation | GFD kinematics | GFD kinematics | waves | waves | Eulerian kinematics | Eulerian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics

License

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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings

License

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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids II (MIT) 2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids II (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course. This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | linear static analysis | solids | solids | structures | structures | nonlinear static analysis | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | heat transfer | fluid flows | fluid flows | finite element methods | finite element methods | ADINA | ADINA | student work | student work | beams | beams | plates | plates | shells | shells | displacement | displacement | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | radiation | radiation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids | acoustic fluids

License

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2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT) 2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT)

Description

This course studies the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact. Topics include fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, with reference to engine power, efficiency, and emissions. Students examine the design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. Class includes lab project in the Engine Laboratory. This course studies the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact. Topics include fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, with reference to engine power, efficiency, and emissions. Students examine the design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. Class includes lab project in the Engine Laboratory.

Subjects

internal combustion engines | internal combustion engines | engine operation | engine operation | engine fuel requirements | engine fuel requirements | environmental impact | environmental impact | fluid flow | thermodynamics | combustion | heat transfer and friction phenomena | fluid flow | thermodynamics | combustion | heat transfer and friction phenomena | fuel properties | fuel properties | power | power | efficiency | efficiency | emissions | emissions | spark-ignition | spark-ignition | diesel | diesel | stratified-charge | stratified-charge | mixed-cycle engine | mixed-cycle engine | full lecture notes | full lecture notes

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2.23 Hydrofoils and Propellers (MIT) 2.23 Hydrofoils and Propellers (MIT)

Description

This course develops the theory and design of hydrofoil sections, including lifting and thickness problems for sub-cavitating sections, unsteady flow problems, and computer-aided design of low drag cavitation-free sections. It also covers lifting line and lifting surface theory with applications to hydrofoil craft, rudder, control surface, propeller and wind turbine rotor design. Other topics include computer-aided design of wake adapted propellers; steady and unsteady propeller thrust and torque; performance analysis and design of wind turbine rotors in steady and stochastic wind; and numerical principles of vortex lattice and lifting surface panel methods. Projects illustrate the development of computational methods for lifting, propeller and wind turbine flows, and use of state-of-the-a This course develops the theory and design of hydrofoil sections, including lifting and thickness problems for sub-cavitating sections, unsteady flow problems, and computer-aided design of low drag cavitation-free sections. It also covers lifting line and lifting surface theory with applications to hydrofoil craft, rudder, control surface, propeller and wind turbine rotor design. Other topics include computer-aided design of wake adapted propellers; steady and unsteady propeller thrust and torque; performance analysis and design of wind turbine rotors in steady and stochastic wind; and numerical principles of vortex lattice and lifting surface panel methods. Projects illustrate the development of computational methods for lifting, propeller and wind turbine flows, and use of state-of-the-a

Subjects

turbine | turbine | rotor | rotor | computer-aided design | computer-aided design | propulsion | propulsion | lifting line | lifting line | thrust | thrust | torque | torque | vortices | vortices | boundary layers | boundary layers | wake adaptation | wake adaptation | cavitation | cavitation | fluid flow | fluid flow | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | lifting surface panel method | lifting surface panel method | vortex lattice method | vortex lattice method | lifting flow | lifting flow

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2.20 Marine Hydrodynamics (13.021) (MIT) 2.20 Marine Hydrodynamics (13.021) (MIT)

Description

In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. The various topics covered are: Transport theorem and conservation principles, Navier-Stokes' equation, dimensional analysis, ideal and potential flows, vorticity and Kelvin's theorem, hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory, viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, model testing, scaling laws, application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces, linearized theory of lifting surfaces, and experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.021. In 2005, In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. The various topics covered are: Transport theorem and conservation principles, Navier-Stokes' equation, dimensional analysis, ideal and potential flows, vorticity and Kelvin's theorem, hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory, viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, model testing, scaling laws, application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces, linearized theory of lifting surfaces, and experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.021. In 2005,

Subjects

fundamentals of fluid mechanics | fundamentals of fluid mechanics | naval architecture | naval architecture | ocean science and engineering | ocean science and engineering | transport theorem | transport theorem | conservation principles | conservation principles | Navier-Stokes' equation | Navier-Stokes' equation | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | ideal and potential flows | ideal and potential flows | vorticity and Kelvin's theorem | vorticity and Kelvin's theorem | hydrodynamic forces in potential flow | hydrodynamic forces in potential flow | D'Alembert's paradox | D'Alembert's paradox | added-mass | added-mass | slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow | slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow | laminar and turbulent boundary layers | laminar and turbulent boundary layers | model testing | model testing | scaling laws | scaling laws | application of potential theory to surface waves | application of potential theory to surface waves | energy transport | energy transport | wave/body forces | wave/body forces | linearized theory of lifting surfaces | linearized theory of lifting surfaces | experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel | experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel

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6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT) 6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | microsystem design | material properties | material properties | microfabrication technologies | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | structural behavior | sensing methods | sensing methods | fluid flow | fluid flow | microscale transport | microscale transport | noise | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | sensing/control systems | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | inertial sensors | sensitivity | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process | realistic microfabrication process

License

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3.044 Materials Processing (MIT) 3.044 Materials Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is focused on physical understanding of materials processing, and the scaling laws that govern process speed, volume, and material quality. In particular, this course will cover the transport of heat and matter as these topics apply to materials processing. This course is focused on physical understanding of materials processing, and the scaling laws that govern process speed, volume, and material quality. In particular, this course will cover the transport of heat and matter as these topics apply to materials processing.

Subjects

materials processing | materials processing | heat conduction | heat conduction | heat transfer | heat transfer | Biot number | Biot number | glass fibers | glass fibers | thermal spray | thermal spray | 2D analysis | 2D analysis | friction welding | friction welding | radiation | radiation | black bodies | black bodies | emessivity | emessivity | solidification | solidification | sand casting | sand casting | lost foam | lost foam | molds | molds | binary solidification | binary solidification | microstructures | microstructures | fluid flow | fluid flow | glass production | glass production | Pilkington glass | Pilkington glass | drag force | drag force | Newtonian | Newtonian | non-Newtonian | non-Newtonian | blow molding | blow molding | compressive forming | compressive forming | powder | powder | sintering | sintering | slurry | slurry | and colloid processing | and colloid processing | steel making | steel making | electronics manufacturing | electronics manufacturing

License

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3.044 Materials Processing (MIT) 3.044 Materials Processing (MIT)

Description

The goal of 3.044 is to teach cost-effective and sustainable production of solid material with a desired geometry, structure or distribution of structures, and production volume. Toward this end, it is organized around different types of phase transformations which determine the structure in various processes for making materials, in roughly increasing order of entropy change during those transformations: solid heat treatment, liquid-solid processing, fluid behavior, deformation processing, and vapor-solid processing. The course ends with several lectures that place the subject in the context of society at large. The goal of 3.044 is to teach cost-effective and sustainable production of solid material with a desired geometry, structure or distribution of structures, and production volume. Toward this end, it is organized around different types of phase transformations which determine the structure in various processes for making materials, in roughly increasing order of entropy change during those transformations: solid heat treatment, liquid-solid processing, fluid behavior, deformation processing, and vapor-solid processing. The course ends with several lectures that place the subject in the context of society at large.

Subjects

diffusion | diffusion | chemical reaction | chemical reaction | phase transformation | phase transformation | heat transport | heat transport | mass transport | mass transport | fluid | fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | recycling | recycling | cost modeling | cost modeling | multilayer | multilayer | biot number | biot number | radiation | radiation | convection | convection | titanium | titanium | moving bodies | moving bodies | Reynolds number | Reynolds number | turbulence | turbulence | reactor | reactor | deformation | deformation | polymer | polymer | vapor transport | vapor transport | nanotechnology | nanotechnology

License

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3.044 Materials Processing (MIT)

Description

The goal of 3.044 is to teach cost-effective and sustainable production of solid material with a desired geometry, structure or distribution of structures, and production volume. Toward this end, it is organized around different types of phase transformations which determine the structure in various processes for making materials, in roughly increasing order of entropy change during those transformations: solid heat treatment, liquid-solid processing, fluid behavior, deformation processing, and vapor-solid processing. The course ends with several lectures that place the subject in the context of society at large.

Subjects

diffusion | chemical reaction | phase transformation | heat transport | mass transport | fluid | fluid flow | recycling | cost modeling | multilayer | biot number | radiation | convection | titanium | moving bodies | Reynolds number | turbulence | reactor | deformation | polymer | vapor transport | nanotechnology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to modelling for 1st year engineers

Description

These resources cover an introduction to modelling for first year engineering undergraduate. The main focus is on electrical and mechanical systems, but there is also some discussion of dc motors, fluids and heat as well as an introduction to time series modelling. The main emphasis is on why modelling is important and how to go about doing this from first principles (e.g. Kirchhoff's laws, Newton's Laws, etc.). Given the focus is on new students arriving at University, there is no attempt to develop models beyond second order. The resources here include the lecture hand out (pdf) which includes embedded tutorial questions, some powerpoints for structuring lectures , flash animations to step through modelling process for electrical circuits and a large data base of CAA developed on webct

Subjects

modelling | mechanical systems | series components | parallel components | potential divider | fluid flow | heat flow | dc servos | time series | systems engineering | mass-spring-damper | engineering undergraduate education | creative commons | ukoer | electric circuits | oer | jisc | hea | hea engineering subject centre university of sheffield | sheffieldunioer | engscoer | cc-by | wales | engineering | Engineering | H000 | ENGINEERING | X

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Enhancing Physics Knowledge for Teaching – Properties of matter

Description

In this session we’ll look at some of the properties of matter.

Subjects

sfsoer | ukoer | elasticity | structure | surface tension | fluid flow | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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3.044 Materials Processing (MIT)

Description

The goal of 3.044 is to teach cost-effective and sustainable production of solid material with a desired geometry, structure or distribution of structures, and production volume. Toward this end, it is organized around different types of phase transformations which determine the structure in various processes for making materials, in roughly increasing order of entropy change during those transformations: solid heat treatment, liquid-solid processing, fluid behavior, deformation processing, and vapor-solid processing. The course ends with several lectures that place the subject in the context of society at large.

Subjects

diffusion | chemical reaction | phase transformation | heat transport | mass transport | fluid | fluid flow | recycling | cost modeling | multilayer | biot number | radiation | convection | titanium | moving bodies | Reynolds number | turbulence | reactor | deformation | polymer | vapor transport | nanotechnology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | solids | structures | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | fluid flows | finite element methods | ADINA | student work | beams | plates | shells | displacement | conduction | convection | radiation | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates on the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact, study of fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, relevant to engine power, efficiency, and emissions, examination of design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. The project section details the Engine Laboratory project. We have aimed this course for graduate and senior undergraduate students.

Subjects

internal combustion engines | engine operation | engine fuel requirements | environmental impact | fluid flow | thermodynamics | combustion | heat transfer and friction phenomena | fuel properties | power | efficiency | emissions | spark-ignition | diesel | stratified-charge | mixed-cycle engine.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.04

License

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12.800 Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean (MIT)

Description

This class introduces fluid dynamics to first year graduate students. The aim is to help students acquire an understanding of some of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics that will be needed as a foundation for advanced courses in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, etc. The emphasis will be on fluid fundamentals, but with an atmosphere/ocean twist.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. File decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site.

Subjects

meteorology | climate | oceanography | Eulerian and Lagrangian kinematics | mass | momentum | energy | Vorticity | divergence Scaling | geostrophic approximation | Ekman layers | Vortex motion | fluid dynamics | atmospheric science | physical oceanography | ocean engineering | oceans | fluid flow | conservation equations | vortex flows | circulation | Earth | rotation | GFD kinematics | waves | Eulerian kinematics | Lagrangian kinematics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids II (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | solids | structures | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | fluid flows | finite element methods | ADINA | student work | beams | plates | shells | displacement | conduction | convection | radiation | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT)

Description

This course studies the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact. Topics include fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, with reference to engine power, efficiency, and emissions. Students examine the design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. Class includes lab project in the Engine Laboratory.

Subjects

internal combustion engines | engine operation | engine fuel requirements | environmental impact | fluid flow | thermodynamics | combustion | heat transfer and friction phenomena | fuel properties | power | efficiency | emissions | spark-ignition | diesel | stratified-charge | mixed-cycle engine | full lecture notes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.23 Hydrofoils and Propellers (MIT)

Description

This course develops the theory and design of hydrofoil sections, including lifting and thickness problems for sub-cavitating sections, unsteady flow problems, and computer-aided design of low drag cavitation-free sections. It also covers lifting line and lifting surface theory with applications to hydrofoil craft, rudder, control surface, propeller and wind turbine rotor design. Other topics include computer-aided design of wake adapted propellers; steady and unsteady propeller thrust and torque; performance analysis and design of wind turbine rotors in steady and stochastic wind; and numerical principles of vortex lattice and lifting surface panel methods. Projects illustrate the development of computational methods for lifting, propeller and wind turbine flows, and use of state-of-the-a

Subjects

turbine | rotor | computer-aided design | propulsion | lifting line | thrust | torque | vortices | boundary layers | wake adaptation | cavitation | fluid flow | fluid dynamics | lifting surface panel method | vortex lattice method | lifting flow

License

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2.20 Marine Hydrodynamics (13.021) (MIT)

Description

In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. The various topics covered are: Transport theorem and conservation principles, Navier-Stokes' equation, dimensional analysis, ideal and potential flows, vorticity and Kelvin's theorem, hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory, viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, model testing, scaling laws, application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces, linearized theory of lifting surfaces, and experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.021. In 2005,

Subjects

fundamentals of fluid mechanics | naval architecture | ocean science and engineering | transport theorem | conservation principles | Navier-Stokes' equation | dimensional analysis | ideal and potential flows | vorticity and Kelvin's theorem | hydrodynamic forces in potential flow | D'Alembert's paradox | added-mass | slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow | laminar and turbulent boundary layers | model testing | scaling laws | application of potential theory to surface waves | energy transport | wave/body forces | linearized theory of lifting surfaces | experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel

License

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