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8.09 Classical Mechanics III (MIT) 8.09 Classical Mechanics III (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, systems with constraints, rigid body dynamics, vibrations, central forces, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables, perturbation theory, and continuous systems. It provides an introduction to ideal and viscous fluid mechanics, including turbulence, as well as an introduction to nonlinear dynamics, including chaos. This course covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, systems with constraints, rigid body dynamics, vibrations, central forces, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables, perturbation theory, and continuous systems. It provides an introduction to ideal and viscous fluid mechanics, including turbulence, as well as an introduction to nonlinear dynamics, including chaos.

Subjects

Lagrangian mechanics | Lagrangian mechanics | Hamiltonian mechanics | Hamiltonian mechanics | systems with constraints | systems with constraints | rigid body dynamics | rigid body dynamics | vibrations | vibrations | central forces | central forces | Hamilton-Jacobi theory | Hamilton-Jacobi theory | action-angle variables | action-angle variables | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | continuous systems | continuous systems | ideal fluid mechanics | ideal fluid mechanics | viscous fluid mechanics | viscous fluid mechanics | turbulence | turbulence | nonlinear dynamics | nonlinear dynamics | chaos | chaos

License

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2.093 Computer Methods in Dynamics (MIT) 2.093 Computer Methods in Dynamics (MIT)

Description

Formulation of finite element methods for analysis of dynamic problems in solids, structures, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Computer calculation of matrices and numerical solution of equilibrium equations by direct integration and mode superposition. Effective eigensolution techniques for calculation of frequencies and mode shapes. Digital computer coding techniques and use of an existing general purpose finite element analysis program. Modeling of problems and interpretation of numerical results. Formulation of finite element methods for analysis of dynamic problems in solids, structures, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Computer calculation of matrices and numerical solution of equilibrium equations by direct integration and mode superposition. Effective eigensolution techniques for calculation of frequencies and mode shapes. Digital computer coding techniques and use of an existing general purpose finite element analysis program. Modeling of problems and interpretation of numerical results.

Subjects

finite element methods | | finite element methods | | solids | | solids | | structures | | structures | | fluid mechanics | | fluid mechanics | | heat transfer | | heat transfer | | equilibrium equations | | equilibrium equations | | direct integration | | direct integration | | mode superposition | | mode superposition | | eigensolution techniques | | eigensolution techniques | | frequencies | | frequencies | | mode shapes. | mode shapes.

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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.03 | 16.04 | 16.04

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13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT) 13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™ This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | interpolation | interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | systems of linear equations | systems of linear equations | differential equations | differential equations | numerical integration | numerical integration | partial differential | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | calculus | complex numbers | complex numbers | root finding | root finding | curve fitting | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | numerical errors | panel methods | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects | oscillating rigid objects | 2.29 | 2.29

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13.021 Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT) 13.021 Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT)

Description

In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. Transport theorem and conservation principles. Navier-Stokes' equation. Dimensional analysis. Ideal and potential flows. Vorticity and Kelvin's theorem. Hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Model testing, scaling laws. Application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces. Linearized theory of lifting surfaces. Experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel. In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. Transport theorem and conservation principles. Navier-Stokes' equation. Dimensional analysis. Ideal and potential flows. Vorticity and Kelvin's theorem. Hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Model testing, scaling laws. Application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces. Linearized theory of lifting surfaces. Experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.

Subjects

ocean science | ocean science | naval architecture | naval architecture | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics

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13.012 Hydrodynamics for Ocean Engineering (MIT) 13.012 Hydrodynamics for Ocean Engineering (MIT)

Description

Development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and their simplifications for several areas of marine hydrodynamics. Application of these principles to the solution of practical ocean engineering problems. Topics include the principles of conservation of mass, momentum and energy; hydrostatic behavior of floating and submerged bodies; lift and drag forces; dimensional anaylsis; wave forces on ships and offshore platforms; laminar and turbulent flows. Experimental projects will be conducted in ocean engineering laboratories illustrating concepts taught in class, including ship resistance and model testing, lift and drag forces on submerged bodies, and vehicle propulsion.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on thi Development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and their simplifications for several areas of marine hydrodynamics. Application of these principles to the solution of practical ocean engineering problems. Topics include the principles of conservation of mass, momentum and energy; hydrostatic behavior of floating and submerged bodies; lift and drag forces; dimensional anaylsis; wave forces on ships and offshore platforms; laminar and turbulent flows. Experimental projects will be conducted in ocean engineering laboratories illustrating concepts taught in class, including ship resistance and model testing, lift and drag forces on submerged bodies, and vehicle propulsion.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on thi

Subjects

Hydrodynamics | | Hydrodynamics | | fluid mechanics | | fluid mechanics | | hydrostatic behavior | | hydrostatic behavior | | laminar flows | | laminar flows | | turbulent flows | | turbulent flows | | fluid motion | fluid motion | 2.016 | 2.016

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas. This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation | Japan | Japan | politics | politics | policy | policy | contemporary Japan | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | electoral politics | interest group politics | interest group politics | party politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | social policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | defense policy | defense policy | energy policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | trade policy | trade policy

License

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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings

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2.29 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (13.024) (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (13.024) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.024. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.024. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | interpolation | interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | systems of linear equations | systems of linear equations | differential equations | differential equations | numerical integration | numerical integration | partial differential | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | calculus | complex numbers | complex numbers | root finding | root finding | curve fitting | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | numerical errors | panel methods | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects | oscillating rigid objects

License

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1.060 Engineering Mechanics II (MIT) 1.060 Engineering Mechanics II (MIT)

Description

This subject provides an introduction to fluid mechanics. Students are introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of fluids and learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there is a chance to put skills from calculus and differential equations to use in this subject, the emphasis is on physical understanding of why a fluid behaves the way it does. The aim is to make the students think as a fluid. In addition to relating a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, the subject prepares students for higher-level subjects in fluid dynamics. This subject provides an introduction to fluid mechanics. Students are introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of fluids and learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there is a chance to put skills from calculus and differential equations to use in this subject, the emphasis is on physical understanding of why a fluid behaves the way it does. The aim is to make the students think as a fluid. In addition to relating a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, the subject prepares students for higher-level subjects in fluid dynamics.

Subjects

fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | fluids | fluids | civil and environmental engineering | civil and environmental engineering | differential equations | differential equations | calculus | calculus | flow | flow | movement | movement | wave forms | wave forms | Bernoulli's theorem | Bernoulli's theorem | wavelets | wavelets | mechanics | mechanics | solids | solids | hydrostatics | hydrostatics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | flow nets | flow nets | velocity | velocity | laminar flow | laminar flow | turbulent flow | turbulent flow | groundwater | groundwater | hydraulics | hydraulics | backwater curves | backwater curves

License

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2.092 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids I (MIT) 2.092 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids I (MIT)

Description

This course introduces finite element methods for the analysis of solid, structural, fluid, field, and heat transfer problems. Steady-state, transient, and dynamic conditions are considered. Finite element methods and solution procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses are presented using largely physical arguments. The homework and a term project (for graduate students) involve use of the general purpose finite element analysis program ADINA. Applications include finite element analyses, modeling of problems, and interpretation of numerical results. This course introduces finite element methods for the analysis of solid, structural, fluid, field, and heat transfer problems. Steady-state, transient, and dynamic conditions are considered. Finite element methods and solution procedures for linear and nonlinear analyses are presented using largely physical arguments. The homework and a term project (for graduate students) involve use of the general purpose finite element analysis program ADINA. Applications include finite element analyses, modeling of problems, and interpretation of numerical results.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation

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2.035 Special Topics in Mathematics with Applications: Linear Algebra and the Calculus of Variations (MIT) 2.035 Special Topics in Mathematics with Applications: Linear Algebra and the Calculus of Variations (MIT)

Description

This course forms an introduction to a selection of mathematical topics that are not covered in traditional mechanical engineering curricula, such as differential geometry, integral geometry, discrete computational geometry, graph theory, optimization techniques, calculus of variations and linear algebra. The topics covered in any particular year depend on the interest of the students and instructor. Emphasis is on basic ideas and on applications in mechanical engineering. This year, the subject focuses on selected topics from linear algebra and the calculus of variations. It is aimed mainly (but not exclusively) at students aiming to study mechanics (solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, energy methods etc.), and the course introduces some of the mathematical tools used in these subjects. App This course forms an introduction to a selection of mathematical topics that are not covered in traditional mechanical engineering curricula, such as differential geometry, integral geometry, discrete computational geometry, graph theory, optimization techniques, calculus of variations and linear algebra. The topics covered in any particular year depend on the interest of the students and instructor. Emphasis is on basic ideas and on applications in mechanical engineering. This year, the subject focuses on selected topics from linear algebra and the calculus of variations. It is aimed mainly (but not exclusively) at students aiming to study mechanics (solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, energy methods etc.), and the course introduces some of the mathematical tools used in these subjects. App

Subjects

calculus of variations | calculus of variations | linear algebra | linear algebra | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | energy methods | energy methods | microstructures of crystalline | microstructures of crystalline

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2.016 Hydrodynamics (13.012) (MIT) 2.016 Hydrodynamics (13.012) (MIT)

Description

This course covers the development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and their simplifications for several areas of marine hydrodynamics and the application of these principles to the solution of engineering problems. Topics include the principles of conservation of mass, momentum and energy, lift and drag forces, laminar and turbulent flows, dimensional analysis, added mass, and linear surface waves, including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Wave forces on structures are treated in the context of design and basic seakeeping analysis of ships and offshore platforms. Geophysical fluid dynamics will also be addressed including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density; heat balance in the ocean; major ocean circulations and This course covers the development of the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics and their simplifications for several areas of marine hydrodynamics and the application of these principles to the solution of engineering problems. Topics include the principles of conservation of mass, momentum and energy, lift and drag forces, laminar and turbulent flows, dimensional analysis, added mass, and linear surface waves, including wave velocities, propagation phenomena, and descriptions of real sea waves. Wave forces on structures are treated in the context of design and basic seakeeping analysis of ships and offshore platforms. Geophysical fluid dynamics will also be addressed including distributions of salinity, temperature, and density; heat balance in the ocean; major ocean circulations and

Subjects

fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | mass | mass | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | lift | lift | drag | drag | laminar | laminar | turbulent | turbulent | turbulence | turbulence | wave | wave | waves | waves | surface waves | surface waves | current | current | water | water | ocean | ocean | force | force | sea | sea | sea wave | sea wave | ship | ship | propulsion | propulsion | propeller | propeller | fish | fish | swimming | swimming | wind | wind | VIV | VIV | vortex induced vibration | vortex induced vibration | Bernoulli | Bernoulli | D'Allembert | D'Allembert | hydrostatics | hydrostatics | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics

License

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2.20 Marine Hydrodynamics (13.021) (MIT) 2.20 Marine Hydrodynamics (13.021) (MIT)

Description

In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. The various topics covered are: Transport theorem and conservation principles, Navier-Stokes' equation, dimensional analysis, ideal and potential flows, vorticity and Kelvin's theorem, hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory, viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, model testing, scaling laws, application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces, linearized theory of lifting surfaces, and experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.021. In 2005, In this course the fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. The various topics covered are: Transport theorem and conservation principles, Navier-Stokes' equation, dimensional analysis, ideal and potential flows, vorticity and Kelvin's theorem, hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory, viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, model testing, scaling laws, application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces, linearized theory of lifting surfaces, and experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.This subject was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.021. In 2005,

Subjects

fundamentals of fluid mechanics | fundamentals of fluid mechanics | naval architecture | naval architecture | ocean science and engineering | ocean science and engineering | transport theorem | transport theorem | conservation principles | conservation principles | Navier-Stokes' equation | Navier-Stokes' equation | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | ideal and potential flows | ideal and potential flows | vorticity and Kelvin's theorem | vorticity and Kelvin's theorem | hydrodynamic forces in potential flow | hydrodynamic forces in potential flow | D'Alembert's paradox | D'Alembert's paradox | added-mass | added-mass | slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow | slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow | laminar and turbulent boundary layers | laminar and turbulent boundary layers | model testing | model testing | scaling laws | scaling laws | application of potential theory to surface waves | application of potential theory to surface waves | energy transport | energy transport | wave/body forces | wave/body forces | linearized theory of lifting surfaces | linearized theory of lifting surfaces | experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel | experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel

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8.01L Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT) 8.01L Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT)

Description

8.01L is an introductory mechanics course, which covers all the topics covered in 8.01T. The class meets throughout the fall, and continues throughout the Independent Activities Period (IAP). 8.01L is an introductory mechanics course, which covers all the topics covered in 8.01T. The class meets throughout the fall, and continues throughout the Independent Activities Period (IAP).

Subjects

Introductory classical mechanics | Introductory classical mechanics | space | space | time | time | straight-line kinematics | straight-line kinematics | motion in a plane | motion in a plane | forces | forces | static equilibrium | static equilibrium | particle dynamics | particle dynamics | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | relative inertial frames | relative inertial frames | non-inertial force | non-inertial force | work | work | potential energy | potential energy | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | ideal gas | ideal gas | rigid bodies | rigid bodies | rotational dynamics | rotational dynamics | vibrational motion | vibrational motion | conservation of angular momentum | conservation of angular momentum | central force motions | central force motions | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | Technology-Enabled Active Learning | Technology-Enabled Active Learning

License

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10.52 Mechanics of Fluids (MIT) 10.52 Mechanics of Fluids (MIT)

Description

This course is an advanced subject in fluid and continuum mechanics. The course content includes kinematics, macroscopic balances for linear and angular momentum, stress tensors, creeping flows and the lubrication approximation, the boundary layer approximation, linear stability theory, and some simple turbulent flows. This course is an advanced subject in fluid and continuum mechanics. The course content includes kinematics, macroscopic balances for linear and angular momentum, stress tensors, creeping flows and the lubrication approximation, the boundary layer approximation, linear stability theory, and some simple turbulent flows.

Subjects

fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | continuum mechanics | continuum mechanics | kinematics | kinematics | macroscopic balances for linear momentum | macroscopic balances for linear momentum | macroscopic balances for angular momentum | macroscopic balances for angular momentum | the stress tensor | the stress tensor | creeping flows | creeping flows | lubrication approximation | lubrication approximation | boundary layer approximation | boundary layer approximation | linear stability theory | linear stability theory | simple turbulent flows | simple turbulent flows

License

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18.357 Interfacial Phenomena (MIT) 18.357 Interfacial Phenomena (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course covers fluid systems dominated by the influence of interfacial tension. The roles of curvature pressure and Marangoni stress are elucidated in a variety of fluid systems. Particular attention is given to drops and bubbles, soap films and minimal surfaces, wetting phenomena, water-repellency, surfactants, Marangoni flows, capillary origami and contact line dynamics. This graduate-level course covers fluid systems dominated by the influence of interfacial tension. The roles of curvature pressure and Marangoni stress are elucidated in a variety of fluid systems. Particular attention is given to drops and bubbles, soap films and minimal surfaces, wetting phenomena, water-repellency, surfactants, Marangoni flows, capillary origami and contact line dynamics.

Subjects

fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | interfacial phenomena | interfacial phenomena | water-repellency | water-repellency | surfactants | surfactants | Marangoni flows | Marangoni flows | capillary origami | capillary origami | contact line dynamics | contact line dynamics | tears of wine | tears of wine

License

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18.098 Street-Fighting Mathematics (MIT) 18.098 Street-Fighting Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course teaches the art of guessing results and solving problems without doing a proof or an exact calculation. Techniques include extreme-cases reasoning, dimensional analysis, successive approximation, discretization, generalization, and pictorial analysis. Applications include mental calculation, solid geometry, musical intervals, logarithms, integration, infinite series, solitaire, and differential equations. (No epsilons or deltas are harmed by taking this course.) This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course teaches the art of guessing results and solving problems without doing a proof or an exact calculation. Techniques include extreme-cases reasoning, dimensional analysis, successive approximation, discretization, generalization, and pictorial analysis. Applications include mental calculation, solid geometry, musical intervals, logarithms, integration, infinite series, solitaire, and differential equations. (No epsilons or deltas are harmed by taking this course.) This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

extreme-cases reasoning | extreme-cases reasoning | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | discretization | discretization | drag | drag | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | pendulum | pendulum | pictorial proofs | pictorial proofs | analogy | analogy | operators | operators | summation | summation | square roots | square roots | logarithms | logarithms | musical intervals | musical intervals | taking out the big part | taking out the big part | integration | integration | differentiation | differentiation

License

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18.307 Integral Equations (MIT) 18.307 Integral Equations (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes concepts and techniques for solving integral equations from an applied mathematics perspective. Material is selected from the following topics: Volterra and Fredholm equations, Fredholm theory, the Hilbert-Schmidt theorem; Wiener-Hopf Method; Wiener-Hopf Method and partial differential equations; the Hilbert Problem and singular integral equations of Cauchy type; inverse scattering transform; and group theory. Examples are taken from fluid and solid mechanics, acoustics, quantum mechanics, and other applications. This course emphasizes concepts and techniques for solving integral equations from an applied mathematics perspective. Material is selected from the following topics: Volterra and Fredholm equations, Fredholm theory, the Hilbert-Schmidt theorem; Wiener-Hopf Method; Wiener-Hopf Method and partial differential equations; the Hilbert Problem and singular integral equations of Cauchy type; inverse scattering transform; and group theory. Examples are taken from fluid and solid mechanics, acoustics, quantum mechanics, and other applications.

Subjects

integral equations | integral equations | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | Volterra equation | Volterra equation | Fredholm equation | Fredholm equation | Fredholm theory | Fredholm theory | Hilbert-Schmidt theorem | Hilbert-Schmidt theorem | Wiener-Hopf Method | Wiener-Hopf Method | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | Hilbert Problem | Hilbert Problem | ingular integral equations | ingular integral equations | Cauchy type | Cauchy type | inverse scattering transform | inverse scattering transform | group theory | group theory | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | acoustics | acoustics | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics

License

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HST.542J Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (MIT) HST.542J Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences. This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences.

Subjects

electrocardiogram | electrocardiogram | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular physiology | cardiovascular physiology | electrophysiology | electrophysiology | myocardial cells | myocardial cells | electrocardiography | electrocardiography | physiological fluid mechanics | physiological fluid mechanics | respiratory physiology | respiratory physiology | renal physiology | renal physiology | quantitative physiology | quantitative physiology | pulmonary mechanics | pulmonary mechanics | heart | heart | arrhythmia | arrhythmia | pulmonary modeling | pulmonary modeling | clinical electrocardiography | clinical electrocardiography | ECG | ECG | EKG | EKG | ischemia | ischemia | infarction | infarction | vector cardiogram | vector cardiogram | purkinje fibers | purkinje fibers | QRS waveform | QRS waveform | tachycardia | tachycardia | action potential | action potential | depolarization | depolarization | afterdepolarization | afterdepolarization | total lung capacity | total lung capacity | systolic | systolic | diastolic | diastolic | residual volume | residual volume | vital capacity | vital capacity | HST.542 | HST.542 | 2.792 | 2.792 | 20.371J20.371 | 20.371J20.371 | 6.022 | 6.022

License

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2.A35 Biomimetic Principles and Design (MIT) 2.A35 Biomimetic Principles and Design (MIT)

Description

Biomimetics is based on the belief that nature, at least at times, is a good engineer. Biomimesis is the scientific method of learning new principles and processes based on systematic study, observation and experimentation with live animals and organisms. This Freshman Advising Seminar on the topic is a way for freshmen to explore some of MIT's richness and learn more about what they may want to study in later years. Biomimetics is based on the belief that nature, at least at times, is a good engineer. Biomimesis is the scientific method of learning new principles and processes based on systematic study, observation and experimentation with live animals and organisms. This Freshman Advising Seminar on the topic is a way for freshmen to explore some of MIT's richness and learn more about what they may want to study in later years.

Subjects

biomimetics | biomimetics | biomimicry | biomimicry | biomimesis | biomimesis | nature | nature | reverse engineering | reverse engineering | bionics | bionics | adaptation | adaptation | genetic algorithms | genetic algorithms | politics | politics | design | design | imitate | imitate | robot | robot | robotics | robotics | robotuna | robotuna | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | fish | fish | swim | swim | submarine | submarine | complexity | complexity

License

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8.09 Classical Mechanics III (MIT)

Description

This course covers Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, systems with constraints, rigid body dynamics, vibrations, central forces, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables, perturbation theory, and continuous systems. It provides an introduction to ideal and viscous fluid mechanics, including turbulence, as well as an introduction to nonlinear dynamics, including chaos.

Subjects

Lagrangian mechanics | Hamiltonian mechanics | systems with constraints | rigid body dynamics | vibrations | central forces | Hamilton-Jacobi theory | action-angle variables | perturbation theory | continuous systems | ideal fluid mechanics | viscous fluid mechanics | turbulence | nonlinear dynamics | chaos

License

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10.52 Mechanics of Fluids (MIT)

Description

This course is an advanced subject in fluid and continuum mechanics. The course content includes kinematics, macroscopic balances for linear and angular momentum, stress tensors, creeping flows and the lubrication approximation, the boundary layer approximation, linear stability theory, and some simple turbulent flows.

Subjects

fluid mechanics | continuum mechanics | kinematics | macroscopic balances for linear momentum | macroscopic balances for angular momentum | the stress tensor | creeping flows | lubrication approximation | boundary layer approximation | linear stability theory | simple turbulent flows

License

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings

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Fluid Mechanics

Description

This course introduces fluid mechanics, the study of how and why fluids (both gaseous and liquid) behave the way they do. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Mechanical Engineering 201)

Subjects

fluid mechanics | fluid statics | dynamics | kinematics | bernoulli | velocity | acceleration | energy | differential analysis | dimensional analysis | hagen–poiseuille | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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