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17.037 American Political Thought (MIT) 17.037 American Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research. This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subjects

american politics | american politics | united states | united states | political theory | political theory | colonial | colonial | contemporary government | contemporary government | national identity | national identity | individual rights | individual rights | liberalism | liberalism | activism | activism | repulicanism | repulicanism | radicalism | radicalism | revolution | revolution | equality | equality | freedom | freedom | protestants | protestants | protestantism | protestantism | colonial america | colonial america | american revolution | american revolution | debate | debate | constitution | constitution | jeffersonian republicans | jeffersonian republicans | hamiltonian federalists | hamiltonian federalists | madison | madison | individualism | individualism | antebellum america | antebellum america | racism | racism | nativism | nativism | sexism | sexism | new inegalitarians | new inegalitarians | politics of inclusion | politics of inclusion | politics of difference | politics of difference | markets | markets | morals | morals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.80 Small-Molecule Spectroscopy and Dynamics (MIT) 5.80 Small-Molecule Spectroscopy and Dynamics (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to illustrate the spectroscopy of small molecules in the gas phase: quantum mechanical effective Hamiltonian models for rotational, vibrational, and electronic structure; transition selection rules and relative intensities; diagnostic patterns and experimental methods for the assignment of non-textbook spectra; breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (spectroscopic perturbations); the stationary phase approximation; nondegenerate and quasidegenerate perturbation theory (van Vleck transformation); qualitative molecular orbital theory (Walsh diagrams); the notation of atomic and molecular spectroscopy. The goal of this course is to illustrate the spectroscopy of small molecules in the gas phase: quantum mechanical effective Hamiltonian models for rotational, vibrational, and electronic structure; transition selection rules and relative intensities; diagnostic patterns and experimental methods for the assignment of non-textbook spectra; breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (spectroscopic perturbations); the stationary phase approximation; nondegenerate and quasidegenerate perturbation theory (van Vleck transformation); qualitative molecular orbital theory (Walsh diagrams); the notation of atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

Subjects

spectroscopy | spectroscopy | harmonic oscillators | harmonic oscillators | matrix | matrix | hamiltonian | hamiltonian | heisenberg | heisenberg | vibrating rotor | vibrating rotor | Born-Oppenheimer | Born-Oppenheimer | diatomics | diatomics | laser schemes | laser schemes | angular momentum | angular momentum | hund's cases | hund's cases | energy levels | energy levels | second-order effects | second-order effects | perturbations | perturbations | Wigner-Eckart | Wigner-Eckart | Rydberg-Klein-Rees | Rydberg-Klein-Rees | rigid rotor | rigid rotor | asymmetric rotor | asymmetric rotor | vibronic coupling | vibronic coupling | wavepackets | wavepackets

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ÁTICAS PARA LA INFORMÁTICA - II (2009)

Description

1.- Familiariza al alumno con los contenidos de la Teoría de Grafos, su manejo y sus múltiples aplicaciones. A lo largo del curso se resuelven problemas tópicos de esta materia relacionados o con utilidad en la Informática desde un punto de vista algorítmico. Se modelizan muchos problemas de la vida "real" como un grafo, para tras aplicarle alguno de los métodos estudiados encontrar una solución. 2.- Se inicia al alumno en técnicas básicas de recuento que permiten averiguar el número de elementos de un conjunto dado sin cortarlos. Las técnicas combinatorias son muy necesarias en Informática dada la frecuencia con la que parecen los problemas combinatorios, en relación con la complejidad de los algoritmos, a la hora de determinar probabilidades de sucesos discretos, etc. 3.-

Subjects

MATEMATICA APLICADA | Grafos | combinatoria | emparejamientos | grafos eulerianos | grafos hamiltonianos | redes

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/es/

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ÁTICAS PARA LA INFORMÁTICA - II (2010)

Description

1.- Familiariza al alumno con los contenidos de la Teoría de Grafos, su manejo y sus múltiples aplicaciones. A lo largo del curso se resuelven problemas tópicos de esta materia relacionados o con utilidad en la Informática desde un punto de vista algorítmico. Se modelizan muchos problemas de la vida "real" como un grafo, para tras aplicarle alguno de los métodos estudiados encontrar una solución. 2.- Se inicia al alumno en técnicas básicas de recuento que permiten averiguar el número de elementos de un conjunto dado sin cortarlos. Las técnicas combinatorias son muy necesarias en Informática dada la frecuencia con la que parecen los problemas combinatorios, en relación con la complejidad de los algoritmos, a la hora de determinar probabilidades de sucesos discretos, etc. 3.-

Subjects

MATEMATICA APLICADA | Grafos | combinatoria | emparejamientos | grafos eulerianos | grafos hamiltonianos | redes

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/es/

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5.80 Small-Molecule Spectroscopy and Dynamics (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to illustrate the spectroscopy of small molecules in the gas phase: quantum mechanical effective Hamiltonian models for rotational, vibrational, and electronic structure; transition selection rules and relative intensities; diagnostic patterns and experimental methods for the assignment of non-textbook spectra; breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (spectroscopic perturbations); the stationary phase approximation; nondegenerate and quasidegenerate perturbation theory (van Vleck transformation); qualitative molecular orbital theory (Walsh diagrams); the notation of atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

Subjects

spectroscopy | harmonic oscillators | matrix | hamiltonian | heisenberg | vibrating rotor | Born-Oppenheimer | diatomics | laser schemes | angular momentum | hund's cases | energy levels | second-order effects | perturbations | Wigner-Eckart | Rydberg-Klein-Rees | rigid rotor | asymmetric rotor | vibronic coupling | wavepackets

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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17.037 American Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subjects

american politics | united states | political theory | colonial | contemporary government | national identity | individual rights | liberalism | activism | repulicanism | radicalism | revolution | equality | freedom | protestants | protestantism | colonial america | american revolution | debate | constitution | jeffersonian republicans | hamiltonian federalists | madison | individualism | antebellum america | racism | nativism | sexism | new inegalitarians | politics of inclusion | politics of difference | markets | morals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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