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ESD.69 Seminar on Health Care Systems Innovation (MIT) ESD.69 Seminar on Health Care Systems Innovation (MIT)

Description

This seminar applies a systems perspective to understand health care delivery today, its stakeholders and problems as well as opportunities. Students are introduced to the 'systems perspective' that has been used successfully in other industries, and will address the introduction of new processes, technologies and strategies to improve overall health outcomes. Students are assigned to teams to work on a semester‐long group project, in collaboration with staff of a nearby Boston hospital. This seminar applies a systems perspective to understand health care delivery today, its stakeholders and problems as well as opportunities. Students are introduced to the 'systems perspective' that has been used successfully in other industries, and will address the introduction of new processes, technologies and strategies to improve overall health outcomes. Students are assigned to teams to work on a semester‐long group project, in collaboration with staff of a nearby Boston hospital.

Subjects

HST.926 | HST.926 | health systems | health systems | quality improvement | quality improvement | safety | safety | health care delivery | health care delivery | payment by results | payment by results | health care and information technology | health care and information technology | process change | process change | uncertainty in clinical decision | uncertainty in clinical decision | variation in clinical decision | variation in clinical decision | performance measures in health care | performance measures in health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT) HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project teams comprised of Harvard and MIT graduate students in medicine, business, law, education, engineering, computer science, public health, and government collaborate to design innovative IT applications. Projects are presented during the final class

Subjects

health care | health care | health care policy | health care policy | patient behavior | patient behavior | information management | information management | medical informatics | medical informatics | medical records | medical records | health record | health record | online medicine | online medicine | PHR | PHR | EHR | EHR | patient privacy | patient privacy | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | start-up | start-up | innovation | innovation | cybermedicine | cybermedicine | telemedicine | telemedicine | non-profit | non-profit | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | insurance | insurance | hospital | hospital | doctor | doctor | patient | patient | medicine | medicine | social networking | social networking | economies of scale | economies of scale | patient education | patient education | self-care | self-care | network integration | network integration | decision support tools | decision support tools | disease managment | disease managment | health economics | health economics | clinical effectiveness | clinical effectiveness | medical software | medical software | mobile applications | mobile applications | intellectual property | intellectual property

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.69 Seminar on Health Care Systems Innovation (MIT)

Description

This seminar applies a systems perspective to understand health care delivery today, its stakeholders and problems as well as opportunities. Students are introduced to the 'systems perspective' that has been used successfully in other industries, and will address the introduction of new processes, technologies and strategies to improve overall health outcomes. Students are assigned to teams to work on a semester?long group project, in collaboration with staff of a nearby Boston hospital.

Subjects

HST.926 | health systems | quality improvement | safety | health care delivery | payment by results | health care and information technology | process change | uncertainty in clinical decision | variation in clinical decision | performance measures in health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Protection and the ICRC

Description

Public Seminar Series, Hilary term 2013. Seminar by Pierre Gentile (ICRC) recorded on 23 January 2013 at the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. Protection as understood by the ICRC, taking the Health Care in Danger project as an illustration. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

red cross | icrc | red crescent | health care | protection | migration | forced migration | refugees | red cross | icrc | red crescent | health care | protection | migration | forced migration | refugees

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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HST.184 Health Information Systems to Improve Quality of Care in Resource-Poor Settings (MIT) HST.184 Health Information Systems to Improve Quality of Care in Resource-Poor Settings (MIT)

Description

This course is a collaborative offering of Sana, Partners in Health, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). The goal of this course is the development of innovations in information systems for developing countries that will (1) translate into improvement in health outcomes, (2) strengthen the existing organizational infrastructure, and (3) create a collaborative ecosystem to maximize the value of these innovations. The course will be taught by guest speakers who are internationally recognized experts in the field and who, with their operational experiences, will outline the challenges they faced and detail how these were addressed. This course is a collaborative offering of Sana, Partners in Health, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). The goal of this course is the development of innovations in information systems for developing countries that will (1) translate into improvement in health outcomes, (2) strengthen the existing organizational infrastructure, and (3) create a collaborative ecosystem to maximize the value of these innovations. The course will be taught by guest speakers who are internationally recognized experts in the field and who, with their operational experiences, will outline the challenges they faced and detail how these were addressed.

Subjects

health informatics | health informatics | clinical decision support | clinical decision support | health care management | health care management | public health | public health | international development | international development | developing country | developing country

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered. This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | just society | values of liberty | values of liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | religious liberty | labor markets | labor markets | health care | health care | affirmative action | affirmative action | abortion | abortion | global justice | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT) HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)

Description

This course will show how information technologies (IT) shape and redefine the health care marketplace. Students will learn how IT enhances medical care through: 1) improved economies of scale, 2) greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care, 3) advanced tools for patient education and self-care, 4) network-integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and 5) opportunities for e-health delivery over the internet. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to design an innovative solution to a current or future health care problem. Students' proposed solutions will draw upon understanding of tools and principles acquired and will be presented as an application design during the final days of the course. Adjunct Faculty Mirena Bagur Sherri Dorfman Paul Heinzelman Gary H This course will show how information technologies (IT) shape and redefine the health care marketplace. Students will learn how IT enhances medical care through: 1) improved economies of scale, 2) greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care, 3) advanced tools for patient education and self-care, 4) network-integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and 5) opportunities for e-health delivery over the internet. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to design an innovative solution to a current or future health care problem. Students' proposed solutions will draw upon understanding of tools and principles acquired and will be presented as an application design during the final days of the course. Adjunct Faculty Mirena Bagur Sherri Dorfman Paul Heinzelman Gary H

Subjects

information technology | information technology | health care system | health care system | economy of scale | economy of scale | technical efficiency | technical efficiency | patient education | patient education | self-care | self-care | network integration | network integration | decision support tool | decision support tool | internet | internet | web | web | disease managment | disease managment | health economics | health economics | clinical effectiveness | clinical effectiveness | trials design | trials design | software | software

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.006J Bioethics (MIT) STS.006J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai

Subjects

medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT) HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)

Description

The healthcare system in the US has been in the midst of a rapid transition in response to changing trends and patterns of care. The growing emphasis on evidence-based medical practice, continuous quality improvement, clinical and cost-effectiveness, and risk management have led to a sea change in medical practice that has been stressful for clinicians, patients, and administrators. As care becomes more tightly managed, it becomes a challenge for clinicians, administrators, and patients to balance time, money, resources, and clinical outcomes. Can emerging technologies help solve these complex problems? How has the demise of the dot.com industry effected these trends and slowed the proliferation of potential solutions?This innovative, trans-faculty course will teach the student how informa The healthcare system in the US has been in the midst of a rapid transition in response to changing trends and patterns of care. The growing emphasis on evidence-based medical practice, continuous quality improvement, clinical and cost-effectiveness, and risk management have led to a sea change in medical practice that has been stressful for clinicians, patients, and administrators. As care becomes more tightly managed, it becomes a challenge for clinicians, administrators, and patients to balance time, money, resources, and clinical outcomes. Can emerging technologies help solve these complex problems? How has the demise of the dot.com industry effected these trends and slowed the proliferation of potential solutions?This innovative, trans-faculty course will teach the student how informa

Subjects

information technology | information technology | health care system | health care system | economy of scale | economy of scale | technical efficiency | technical efficiency | patient education | patient education | self-care | self-care | network integration | network integration | decision support tool | decision support tool | internet | internet | web | web | disease managment | disease managment | health economics | health economics | clinical effectiveness | clinical effectiveness | trials design | trials design | software | software

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT) HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT)

Description

The objective of this course is to present a conceptual approach to the study of pharmacological agents. Emphasis is on the principles that determine drug actions and disposition. The course is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopeia nor to replace discussions of specific relevant drugs in the organ systems Health Sciences and Technology pathophysiology courses. The objective of this course is to present a conceptual approach to the study of pharmacological agents. Emphasis is on the principles that determine drug actions and disposition. The course is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopeia nor to replace discussions of specific relevant drugs in the organ systems Health Sciences and Technology pathophysiology courses.

Subjects

health care | health care | pharmacology | pharmacology | pharmacologic agents | pharmacologic agents | medical | medical | pre-clinical | pre-clinical | biophysics | biophysics | biochemistry | biochemistry | physiology related to drug action | physiology related to drug action | interaction | interaction | distribution | distribution | metabolism | metabolism | toxicity | toxicity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.472 Public Economics II (MIT) 14.472 Public Economics II (MIT)

Description

This course covers theory and evidence on government expenditure policy-- topics include:The theory of public goodsEducationState and local public goodsPolitical economyRedistribution and welfare policySocial insurance programs such as social security and unemployment insuranceHealth care policy This course covers theory and evidence on government expenditure policy-- topics include:The theory of public goodsEducationState and local public goodsPolitical economyRedistribution and welfare policySocial insurance programs such as social security and unemployment insuranceHealth care policy

Subjects

Expenditure Policy | Expenditure Policy | Theory Of Public Goods | Theory Of Public Goods | State Public Goods | State Public Goods | Local Public Goods | Local Public Goods | Political Economy | Political Economy | Welfare Policy | Welfare Policy | Social Insurance | Social Insurance | Social Security | Social Security | Unemployment Insurance | Unemployment Insurance | health care policy | health care policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT) 17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT)

Description

What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more. What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | affirmative action | affirmative action | religion | religion | sexuality | sexuality | evolution | evolution | creationism | creationism | prostitution | prostitution | beauty | beauty | meaning of life | meaning of life | health care | health care | euthanasia | euthanasia | gender | gender | race | race

License

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17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT) 17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e

Subjects

Health care | Health care | policy | policy | United States | United States | medical services | medical services | health care costs | health care costs | markets | markets | regulatory policy | regulatory policy | Canada | Canada | Great Britian | Great Britian | Japan | Japan | Germany | Germany | technology | technology | decentralization | decentralization | health risks | health risks | comparative prospectives | comparative prospectives | access | access | reform | reform | political | political | organizational | organizational | factors | factors

License

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STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT) STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and othe Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and othe

Subjects

risk | risk | science | science | society | society | ethics | ethics | politics | politics | technology | technology | history | history | controversy | controversy | atomic | atomic | whistleblowing | whistleblowing | GMO | GMO | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | nuclear | nuclear | space exploration | space exploration | energy | energy | policy | policy | debate | debate | museum | museum | archeology | archeology | war | war | terrorism | terrorism | tradeoff | tradeoff | decision making | decision making | medicine | medicine | health care policy | health care policy | biotechnology | biotechnology | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | human subjects | human subjects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.472 Public Economics II (MIT) 14.472 Public Economics II (MIT)

Description

This course covers theory and evidence on government expenditure policy-- topics include: The theory of public goods; Education; State and local public goods; Political economy; Redistribution and welfare policy; Social insurance programs such as social security and unemployment insurance; and Health care policy. This course covers theory and evidence on government expenditure policy-- topics include: The theory of public goods; Education; State and local public goods; Political economy; Redistribution and welfare policy; Social insurance programs such as social security and unemployment insurance; and Health care policy.

Subjects

expenditure policy | expenditure policy | theory of public goods | theory of public goods | state public goods | state public goods | local public goods | local public goods | political economy | political economy | welfare policy | welfare policy | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | unemployment insurance | unemployment insurance | health care policy | health care policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT) 24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers. This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | 24.06 | STS.006 | STS.006 | medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | life support | life support | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | enhancing or cheating | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT) HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT)

Description

The object of the course is to teach students an approach to the study of pharmacologic agents. It is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopoeia. The focus is on the basic principles of biophysics, biochemistry and physiology, as related to the mechanisms of drug action, biodistribution and metabolism. The course consists of lectures and student-led case discussions. Topics covered include: mechanisms of drug action, dose-response relations, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems, drug metabolism, toxicity of pharmacological agents, drug interaction and substance abuse. Selected agents and classes of agents are examined in detail. Lecturers Prof. Keith Baker Dr. Mark Dershwitz Harold Demonaco Dr. Daniel Kohane Dr. Donald Kufe Prof. Robert Langer Dr. Robert Lees Dr. Robert Rubin The object of the course is to teach students an approach to the study of pharmacologic agents. It is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopoeia. The focus is on the basic principles of biophysics, biochemistry and physiology, as related to the mechanisms of drug action, biodistribution and metabolism. The course consists of lectures and student-led case discussions. Topics covered include: mechanisms of drug action, dose-response relations, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems, drug metabolism, toxicity of pharmacological agents, drug interaction and substance abuse. Selected agents and classes of agents are examined in detail. Lecturers Prof. Keith Baker Dr. Mark Dershwitz Harold Demonaco Dr. Daniel Kohane Dr. Donald Kufe Prof. Robert Langer Dr. Robert Lees Dr. Robert Rubin

Subjects

health care | health care | pharmacology | pharmacology | pharmacologic agents | pharmacologic agents | medical | medical | pre-clinical | pre-clinical | biophysics | biophysics | biochemistry | biochemistry | physiology related to drug action | physiology related to drug action | interaction | interaction | distribution | distribution | metabolism | metabolism | toxicity | toxicity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT) MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT)

Description

Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to th Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to th

Subjects

appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | international development | international development | micro-finance | micro-finance | social entrepreneurship | social entrepreneurship | social venture | social venture | communications technology | communications technology | cell phone | cell phone | cellular technology | cellular technology | SMS | SMS | mobile phone | mobile phone | mobile technology | mobile technology | innovation | innovation | health care | health care | economic empowerment | economic empowerment | education | education | civic engagement | civic engagement | bottom of the pyramid | bottom of the pyramid | poverty | poverty | ICT | ICT | ICT4D | ICT4D | can you make a cellphone change the world? | can you make a cellphone change the world?

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT) 17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e

Subjects

Health care | Health care | policy | policy | United States | United States | medical services | medical services | health care costs | health care costs | markets | markets | regulatory policy | regulatory policy | Canada | Canada | Great Britian | Great Britian | Japan | Japan | Germany | Germany | technology | technology | decentralization | decentralization | health risks | health risks | comparative prospectives | comparative prospectives | access | access | reform | reform | political | political | organizational | organizational | factors | factors

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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A Welcome to the Programme in Evidence-Based Health Care

Description

Dr Carl Heneghan, the Director of the Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine, gives a brief welcome to the Programme in Evidence-Based Health Care. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Medicine | masters | health care | degree | Medicine | masters | health care | degree

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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An introduction to the Masters in Evidence-Based Health Care

Description

Sharon Mickan, a Knowledge Translation Fellow in the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine, gives an introduction to the Masters in Evidence-Based Health Care. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Medicine | masters | health care | degree | Medicine | masters | health care | degree

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.002J Making Public Policy (MIT) 11.002J Making Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course aims to get students thinking about politics and policy as a part of their everyday life. We treat politics as a struggle among competing advocates trying to persuade others to see the world as they do, working within a context that is structured primarily by institutions and cultural ideas. We’ll begin by developing a policymaking framework, understanding ideology, and taking a whirlwind tour of the American political system. Then, we’ll examine six policy issues in depth: health care, gun control, the federal budget, immigration reform, same-sex marriage, and energy and climate change. This course aims to get students thinking about politics and policy as a part of their everyday life. We treat politics as a struggle among competing advocates trying to persuade others to see the world as they do, working within a context that is structured primarily by institutions and cultural ideas. We’ll begin by developing a policymaking framework, understanding ideology, and taking a whirlwind tour of the American political system. Then, we’ll examine six policy issues in depth: health care, gun control, the federal budget, immigration reform, same-sex marriage, and energy and climate change.

Subjects

public policy | public policy | politics | politics | policy | policy | advocate | advocate | institutions | institutions | government | government | ideology | ideology | health care | health care | gun control | gun control | federal budget | federal budget | immigration | immigration | same-sex marriage | same-sex marriage | energy | energy | climate change | climate change | reform | reform | capitalism | capitalism | freedom | freedom | agendas | agendas | congress | congress | interest groups | interest groups | public opinion | public opinion | obamacare | obamacare | ACA | ACA | recession | recession | deficit | deficit | debt | debt | fiscal cliff | fiscal cliff | sequester | sequester | executive action | executive action | social policy | social policy | amendment | amendment | federalism | federalism | judicial review | judicial review | renewable energy | renewable energy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Understanding narratives in health care Understanding narratives in health care

Description

What are the ways in which others (patients, relatives, practitioners) and you create and share meanings within health care? Narratives are the stories used by individuals to make sense of events. In this free course, Understanding narratives in health care, you are guided on how to identify narratives, those that might either support or undermine health care practice. First published on Fri, 12 Feb 2016 as Understanding narratives in health care. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 What are the ways in which others (patients, relatives, practitioners) and you create and share meanings within health care? Narratives are the stories used by individuals to make sense of events. In this free course, Understanding narratives in health care, you are guided on how to identify narratives, those that might either support or undermine health care practice. First published on Fri, 12 Feb 2016 as Understanding narratives in health care. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Health | Health | Health Studies | Health Studies | K829_1 | K829_1 | narratives | narratives | health care | health care

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Medicine transformed: on access to healthcare Medicine transformed: on access to healthcare

Description

Access to healthcare is important to all of us. Did the arrival of state medicine in the twentieth century mean that everyone had access to good medical services? If you fell sick in 1930 where could you get treatment from a GP, a hospital, a nurse? This free course, Medicine transformed: On access to healthcare, shows that in the early twentieth century, access to care was unequally divided. The rich could afford care; working men, women and children were helped by the state; others had to rely on their own resources. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Medicine transformed: on access to healthcare. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Access to healthcare is important to all of us. Did the arrival of state medicine in the twentieth century mean that everyone had access to good medical services? If you fell sick in 1930 where could you get treatment from a GP, a hospital, a nurse? This free course, Medicine transformed: On access to healthcare, shows that in the early twentieth century, access to care was unequally divided. The rich could afford care; working men, women and children were helped by the state; others had to rely on their own resources. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Medicine transformed: on access to healthcare. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

History of Medicine | History of Medicine | health care | health care | medicine | medicine | A218_1 | A218_1 | healthcare | healthcare

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT) 21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT)

Description

This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial

Subjects

libertarianism | libertarianism | history | history | politics | politics | state | state | regulatory state | regulatory state | freedom | freedom | property | property | equality | equality | community | community | republicanism | republicanism | liberty | liberty | slavery | slavery | religious freedom | religious freedom | civil liberties | civil liberties | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | health care | health care | financial market | financial market | the internet | the internet | Rawls | Rawls | Nozick | Nozick | Obamacare | Obamacare | Rand Paul | Rand Paul | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | de Toqueville | de Toqueville | economic good | economic good | Martin Luther King | Martin Luther King | capitalism | capitalism | John Locke | John Locke | distributive justice | distributive justice | communitarianism | communitarianism | civil republicanism | civil republicanism | chattel | chattel | Freedom Principle | Freedom Principle | antislavery | antislavery | First Amendment | First Amendment | free exercise | free exercise | religious accomodation | religious accomodation | phone surveillance | phone surveillance | private regulation | private regulation | Aaron Swartz | Aaron Swartz | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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