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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics. This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

Subjects

international economics | international economics | nternational trade | nternational trade | foreign investment | foreign investment | commercial policy | commercial policy | Ricardian models | Ricardian models | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | empirical tests | empirical tests | intermediate input trade | intermediate input trade | wage inequality | wage inequality | external scale economics | external scale economics | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | intraindustry heterogeneity | intraindustry heterogeneity | technological theories of FDI | technological theories of FDI | transaction-cost approach | transaction-cost approach | property-rights approach | property-rights approach | dynamic trade theory | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | technology and growth | innovation | innovation | technology transfer | technology transfer | product cycles | product cycles | tariff retaliation | tariff retaliation | WTO | WTO | regionalism | regionalism | multilateralism | multilateralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.72 Groundwater Hydrology (MIT) 1.72 Groundwater Hydrology (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. The class includes laboratory and computer demonstrations.Technical RequirementsFEFLOW® software  is required for two problem sets on this course site. FEFLOW® (Finite Element subsurface FLOW system) is a 3-D groundwater modeling software, developed by WASY, a German consulting firm. FEFLOW® uses the finite element method to solve 3D groundwater flow equations. RealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site. This course covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. The class includes laboratory and computer demonstrations.Technical RequirementsFEFLOW® software  is required for two problem sets on this course site. FEFLOW® (Finite Element subsurface FLOW system) is a 3-D groundwater modeling software, developed by WASY, a German consulting firm. FEFLOW® uses the finite element method to solve 3D groundwater flow equations. RealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.

Subjects

D'arcy equation | D'arcy equation | flow nets | flow nets | mass conservation | mass conservation | the aquifer flow equation | the aquifer flow equation | heterogeneity and anisotropy | heterogeneity and anisotropy | storage properties | storage properties | regional circulation | regional circulation | unsaturated flow | unsaturated flow | recharge | recharge | stream-aquifer interaction | stream-aquifer interaction | well hydraulics | well hydraulics | flow through fractured rock | flow through fractured rock | numerical models | numerical models | groundwater quality | groundwater quality | contaminant transport processes | contaminant transport processes | dispersion | dispersion | decay | decay | adsorption | adsorption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.72 Groundwater Hydrology (MIT) 1.72 Groundwater Hydrology (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. The class includes laboratory and computer demonstrations. This course covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. The class includes laboratory and computer demonstrations.

Subjects

D'arcy equation | D'arcy equation | flow nets | flow nets | mass conservation | mass conservation | the aquifer flow equation | the aquifer flow equation | heterogeneity and anisotropy | heterogeneity and anisotropy | storage properties | storage properties | regional circulation | regional circulation | unsaturated flow | unsaturated flow | recharge | recharge | stream-aquifer interaction | stream-aquifer interaction | well hydraulics | well hydraulics | flow through fractured rock | flow through fractured rock | numerical models | numerical models | groundwater quality | groundwater quality | contaminant transport processes | contaminant transport processes | dispersion | dispersion | decay | decay | adsorption | adsorption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT) 14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information 14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analytical tools | analysis | analysis | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | coordintation | coordintation | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | technolgy | technolgy | distribution | distribution | employment | employment | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | demographics | demographics | complementarities | complementarities | amplification | amplification | recursive equilibria | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | uncertainty | morris | morris | shin | shin | global games | global games | policy | policy | price | price | aggregation | aggregation | social learning | social learning | dynamic adjustment | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | heterogeneous agents | savings | savings | utility | utility | aiyagari | aiyagari | steady state | steady state | krusell | krusell | smith | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | growth | fluctuations | fluctuations | heterogeneity | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | time inconsistency | reputation | reputation | information | information | coordination games | coordination games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography.) It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography.) It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international economics | international trade | international trade | Ricardian model | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | trade theory | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | foreign investment | gravity models | gravity models | offshoring | offshoring | fragmentation of production | fragmentation of production

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international economics | international trade | international trade | Ricardian model | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | trade theory | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | foreign investment | gravity models | gravity models | trade and growth | trade and growth | labor markets | labor markets | offshoring | offshoring | fragmentation of production | fragmentation of production | multinational firms | multinational firms | political economy | political economy | WTO | WTO | world trade organization | world trade organization | dynamic trade theory | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | technology and growth | innovation | innovation | technology transfer | technology transfer | product cycles | product cycles | tariff retaliation | tariff retaliation | regionalism | regionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international trade | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | gravity models | trade and growth | labor markets | offshoring | fragmentation of production | multinational firms | political economy | WTO | world trade organization | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | innovation | technology transfer | product cycles | tariff retaliation | regionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.72 Groundwater Hydrology (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. The class includes laboratory and computer demonstrations.

Subjects

D'arcy equation | flow nets | mass conservation | the aquifer flow equation | heterogeneity and anisotropy | storage properties | regional circulation | unsaturated flow | recharge | stream-aquifer interaction | well hydraulics | flow through fractured rock | numerical models | groundwater quality | contaminant transport processes | dispersion | decay | adsorption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allportuguesecourses.xml

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, Are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international trade | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | gravity models | trade and growth | labor markets | offshoring | fragmentation of production | multinational firms | political economy | WTO | world trade organization | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | innovation | technology transfer | product cycles | tariff retaliation | regionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

Subjects

international economics | nternational trade | foreign investment | commercial policy | Ricardian models | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | empirical tests | intermediate input trade | wage inequality | external scale economics | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | intraindustry heterogeneity | technological theories of FDI | transaction-cost approach | property-rights approach | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | innovation | technology transfer | product cycles | tariff retaliation | WTO | regionalism | multilateralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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1.72 Groundwater Hydrology (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. The class includes laboratory and computer demonstrations.Technical RequirementsFEFLOW® software  is required for two problem sets on this course site. FEFLOW® (Finite Element subsurface FLOW system) is a 3-D groundwater modeling software, developed by WASY, a German consulting firm. FEFLOW® uses the finite element method to solve 3D groundwater flow equations. RealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.

Subjects

D'arcy equation | flow nets | mass conservation | the aquifer flow equation | heterogeneity and anisotropy | storage properties | regional circulation | unsaturated flow | recharge | stream-aquifer interaction | well hydraulics | flow through fractured rock | numerical models | groundwater quality | contaminant transport processes | dispersion | decay | adsorption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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1.72 Groundwater Hydrology (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. The class includes laboratory and computer demonstrations.

Subjects

D'arcy equation | flow nets | mass conservation | the aquifer flow equation | heterogeneity and anisotropy | storage properties | regional circulation | unsaturated flow | recharge | stream-aquifer interaction | well hydraulics | flow through fractured rock | numerical models | groundwater quality | contaminant transport processes | dispersion | decay | adsorption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography.) It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do countries trade? What goods do countries trade? What are the implications of openness for the location of production, industries, occupations, and innovative activity? And, what impedes trade and why do some countries deliberately erect policy impediments to trade? The course also concerns normative issues, such as: Is trade openness beneficial to a representative agent? And, are there winners and losers from trade and if so, can we identify them? Throughout, these issues are approached in neoclassical settings as well as those with market failures, at the industry-level as we

Subjects

international economics | international trade | Ricardian model | law of comparative advantage | Ricardo-Viner model | Heckscher-Ohlin model | neoclassical trade theories | monopolistic competition | trade theory | firm-level heterogeneity | foreign investment | gravity models | offshoring | fragmentation of production

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analysis | endogenous growth | coordintation | incomplete markets | technolgy | distribution | employment | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | demographics | complementarities | amplification | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | morris | shin | global games | policy | price | aggregation | social learning | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | savings | utility | aiyagari | steady state | krusell | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | fluctuations | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | reputation | information | coordination games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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