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11.489 The Growth and Spatial Structure of Cities (MIT) 11.489 The Growth and Spatial Structure of Cities (MIT)

Description

This course examines the economic, political, social, and spatial dynamics of urban growth and decline in cities and their key component areas (downtown, suburbs, etc.). Topics include impacts of industrialization, technology, politics, and social practices on cities. Students will examine the role of public and private sector activities, ranging from zoning and subsidies to infrastructure development and real estate investment, in affecting urban growth and decline. Readings are both theoretical and empirical, with considerable thought paid to comparative and historical differences. This course examines the economic, political, social, and spatial dynamics of urban growth and decline in cities and their key component areas (downtown, suburbs, etc.). Topics include impacts of industrialization, technology, politics, and social practices on cities. Students will examine the role of public and private sector activities, ranging from zoning and subsidies to infrastructure development and real estate investment, in affecting urban growth and decline. Readings are both theoretical and empirical, with considerable thought paid to comparative and historical differences.

Subjects

urban growth | urban growth | city structure | city structure | urban history | urban history | economics | economics | urban form and function | urban form and function | inter-urban dynamics | inter-urban dynamics | intra-urban dynamics | intra-urban dynamics | housing | housing | employment | employment | industrialization | industrialization | globalization | globalization | politics | politics | policy | policy | growth management | growth management | de-industrialization | de-industrialization | centralization | centralization | de-centralization | de-centralization | urban renewal | urban renewal | urban decline | urban decline | suburbanization | suburbanization | sprawl | sprawl

License

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This subject is taught at MIT in an open format. The interactive discussion ranges widely and is designed to help entering graduate students understand the context of the specific papers, read empirical work critically, and make up their minds whether an argument is convincing. The aims of the subject therefore are both to inform students about economic history and to give them a taste of applied economic research. This subject is taught at MIT in an open format. The interactive discussion ranges widely and is designed to help entering graduate students understand the context of the specific papers, read empirical work critically, and make up their minds whether an argument is convincing. The aims of the subject therefore are both to inform students about economic history and to give them a taste of applied economic research.

Subjects

world economic history | world economic history | methodology | methodology | industrialization | industrialization | agrarian economy | agrarian economy | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | europe | europe | russia | russia | latin america | latin america | japan | japan | china | china | slavery | slavery | labor | labor | corporation | corporation | great depression | great depression | war | war

License

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

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17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT) 17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT)

Description

At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death, At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death,

Subjects

Soviet Union | Soviet Union | politics | politics | communism | communism | history | history | socialist republics | socialist republics | world war two | world war two | stalin | stalin | khruschev | khruschev | brezhnev | brezhnev | october revolution | october revolution | political economy | political economy | lenin | lenin | industrialization | industrialization | collectivism | collectivism | repression | repression | society | society | culture | culture | Soviet system | Soviet system | U.S.S.R. | U.S.S.R. | Soviet society | Soviet society | political reform | political reform | social reform | social reform | revolutionary regime | revolutionary regime | Stalin revolution | Stalin revolution | post-Stalinist | post-Stalinist | Soviet collapse | Soviet collapse | political history | political history | 17.57 | 17.57 | 21H.467 | 21H.467

License

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11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an

Subjects

Beijing | Beijing | China | China | urban design | urban design | development | development | shougang | shougang | capital steel factory | capital steel factory | de-industrialization | de-industrialization | Olympic Games | Olympic Games | site redevelopment | site redevelopment | heritage site | heritage site | environment | environment | urban development | urban development | energy | energy | site understanding | site understanding | land use | land use | design concept | design concept | bioremediation | bioremediation | transit | transit | subway | subway | light rail | light rail | urban planning | urban planning | architecture | architecture | brownfield | brownfield

License

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11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT) 11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of

Subjects

digital media | digital media | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology industrialization | mythology industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development

License

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11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT) 11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors. This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | technological capabilities | technological capabilities | world technological frontier | world technological frontier | innovation | innovation | new products | new products | production engineering | production engineering | project execution | project execution | borrowed technology | borrowed technology | third world development | third world development | industrialization | industrialization | pre WWII | pre WWII | post WWII | post WWII | underdevelopment | underdevelopment | lendingm | lendingm | government regulation | government regulation | 11.491 | 11.491 | 17.176 | 17.176

License

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11.122 Environment and Society (MIT) 11.122 Environment and Society (MIT)

Description

Modern industrial activities - which MIT engineers and scientists play a major role in - have significant environmental and social impacts. Trends towards further industrialization and globalization portend major challenges for society to manage the adverse impacts of our urban and industrial activities. How serious are current environmental and social problems? Why should we care about them? How are governments, corporations, activists, and ordinary citizens responding to these problems. This course examines environmental and social impacts of industrial society and policy responses. We will explore current trends in industrialization, urbanization, and globalization, analyze the impacts these trends have on human health, environmental sustainability, and equity, and then examine a range Modern industrial activities - which MIT engineers and scientists play a major role in - have significant environmental and social impacts. Trends towards further industrialization and globalization portend major challenges for society to manage the adverse impacts of our urban and industrial activities. How serious are current environmental and social problems? Why should we care about them? How are governments, corporations, activists, and ordinary citizens responding to these problems. This course examines environmental and social impacts of industrial society and policy responses. We will explore current trends in industrialization, urbanization, and globalization, analyze the impacts these trends have on human health, environmental sustainability, and equity, and then examine a range

Subjects

industrial | industrial | scientist | scientist | engineer | engineer | modern | modern | modern industry | modern industry | industrialization | industrialization | globalization | globalization | current | current | environmental | environmental | social problems | social problems | policy | policy | urbanization | urbanization | human health | human health | environmental sustainability | environmental sustainability | equity | equity

License

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14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT) 14.71 Economic History of Financial Crises (MIT)

Description

This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008. This course gives a historical perspective on financial panics. Topics include the growth of the industrial world, the Great Depression and surrounding events, and more recent topics such as the first oil crisis, Japanese stagnation, and conditions following the financial crisis of 2008.

Subjects

economic history | economic history | financial crises | financial crises | industrialization | industrialization | World War I | World War I | depression | depression | recovery | recovery | World War II | World War II | the Golden Age | the Golden Age | income inequality | income inequality | oil crises | oil crises | 1970s | 1970s | Japanese growth and stagnation | Japanese growth and stagnation | small crises | small crises | imbalance | imbalance | 2008 crisis | 2008 crisis | 2009 crisis | 2009 crisis | 1930s | 1930s | 1940s | 1940s

License

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth. This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses | labor history | labor history | discrimination | discrimination | technology | technology | institutions | institutions | financial crises | financial crises | migration | migration | recovery after shocks | recovery after shocks | wages | wages | inequality | inequality | health | health | stock market regulation | stock market regulation

License

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course offers a comprehensive survey of world economic history, designed to introduce economics graduate students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. A final term paper is due at the end of the course. This course offers a comprehensive survey of world economic history, designed to introduce economics graduate students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. A final term paper is due at the end of the course.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses

License

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21A.235 American Dream: Exploring Class in the U.S. (MIT) 21A.235 American Dream: Exploring Class in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

Americans have historically preferred to think of the United States in classless terms, as a land of economic opportunity equally open to all. Yet, social class remains a central fault line in the U.S. Subject explores the experiences and understandings of class among Americans positioned at different points along the U.S. social spectrum. Considers a variety of classic frameworks for analyzing social class and uses memoirs, novels and ethnographies to gain a sense of how class is experienced in daily life and how it intersects with other forms of social difference such as race and gender. Americans have historically preferred to think of the United States in classless terms, as a land of economic opportunity equally open to all. Yet, social class remains a central fault line in the U.S. Subject explores the experiences and understandings of class among Americans positioned at different points along the U.S. social spectrum. Considers a variety of classic frameworks for analyzing social class and uses memoirs, novels and ethnographies to gain a sense of how class is experienced in daily life and how it intersects with other forms of social difference such as race and gender.

Subjects

Class | Class | inequality | inequality | anthropology | anthropology | narrative | narrative | ethnography | ethnography | marx | marx | weber | weber | bourdieu | bourdieu | post-structuralism | post-structuralism | habitus | habitus | race | race | gender | gender | upward mobility | upward mobility | downward mobility | downward mobility | deindustrialization | deindustrialization | assembly line | assembly line | rich | rich | post war | post war | underclass | underclass

License

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21H.102 The Emergence of Modern America 1865-Present (MIT) 21H.102 The Emergence of Modern America 1865-Present (MIT)

Description

This subject studies the changing structure of American politics, economics, and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. We will consider secondary historical accounts and primary documents to examine some of the key issues in the development of modern America: industrialization and urbanization; U.S. emergence as a global power; ideas about rights and equality; and the changing structures of gender, class, and race. This subject also examines the multiple answers that Americans gave to the question of what it means to be an American in the modern age. As a communications intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises. This subject studies the changing structure of American politics, economics, and society from the end of the Civil War to the present. We will consider secondary historical accounts and primary documents to examine some of the key issues in the development of modern America: industrialization and urbanization; U.S. emergence as a global power; ideas about rights and equality; and the changing structures of gender, class, and race. This subject also examines the multiple answers that Americans gave to the question of what it means to be an American in the modern age. As a communications intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises.

Subjects

America | America | politics | politics | economics | economics | society | society | post-Civil War | post-Civil War | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | global power | global power | equality | equality | gender | gender | class | class | race | race

License

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights (MIT)

Description

Central to our era is the gradual movement of all the world's regions toward a uniform standard of economic and political development. In this class we will read a variety of recent narratives that partake of, dissent from, or contribute to this story, ranging from novels and poems to World Bank and IMF statements and National Geographic reports. We will seek to understand the many motives and voices – sometimes congruent, sometimes clashing – that are currently engaged in producing accounts of people in the developing world: their hardships, laughter, and courage, and how they help themselves and are helped by outsiders who may or may not have philanthropic motives. Readings will include literature by J. G. Ballard, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, and John le Carré, Central to our era is the gradual movement of all the world's regions toward a uniform standard of economic and political development. In this class we will read a variety of recent narratives that partake of, dissent from, or contribute to this story, ranging from novels and poems to World Bank and IMF statements and National Geographic reports. We will seek to understand the many motives and voices – sometimes congruent, sometimes clashing – that are currently engaged in producing accounts of people in the developing world: their hardships, laughter, and courage, and how they help themselves and are helped by outsiders who may or may not have philanthropic motives. Readings will include literature by J. G. Ballard, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, and John le Carré,

Subjects

developing world | developing world | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | industrialization | industrialization | economic development | economic development | human rights | human rights | global human rights | global human rights | global issues | global issues | global development | global development | literary perspective | literary perspective | Jamaica Kincaid | Jamaica Kincaid | JG Ballard | JG Ballard | John le Carre | John le Carre | Rohinton Mistry | Rohinton Mistry | World Bank | World Bank | National Geographic | National Geographic

License

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | women authors | comfort women | comfort women | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | slave novel | slave novel | sensationalism | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | sentimentalism | realism | realism | postmodern fiction | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | American Revolution | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | Puritanism | SP.517 | SP.517 | WMN.517 | WMN.517

License

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STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT) STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT)

Description

This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper. This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper.

Subjects

STS.025 | STS.025 | 21H.913 | 21H.913 | world history | world history | British history | British history | European history | European history | Asian history | Asian history | South American history | South American history | American history | American history | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | transportation | transportation | warfare | warfare | capitalism | capitalism | electrification | electrification | factories | factories | mass communication | mass communication | industrialization | industrialization

License

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STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT) STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT)

Description

Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology, Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology,

Subjects

history | history | technology | technology | science | science | techne | techne | industry | industry | intellectual history | intellectual history | cultural history | cultural history | management | management | engineering | engineering | industrial arts | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanism | mechanical arts | mechanical arts | technological determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufacturing | manufactures | manufactures | factory | factory | capitalism | capitalism | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | innovation | innovation | ecology | ecology | environmentalism | environmentalism | pollution | pollution | literature | literature | American history | American history | the Enlightenment | the Enlightenment | industrialization | industrialization | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution

License

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STS.340J Introduction to the History of Technology (MIT) STS.340J Introduction to the History of Technology (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the consideration of technology as the outcome of particular technical, historical, cultural, and political efforts, especially in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include industrialization of production and consumption, development of engineering professions, the emergence of management and its role in shaping technological forms, the technological construction of gender roles, and the relationship between humans and machines. This course is an introduction to the consideration of technology as the outcome of particular technical, historical, cultural, and political efforts, especially in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include industrialization of production and consumption, development of engineering professions, the emergence of management and its role in shaping technological forms, the technological construction of gender roles, and the relationship between humans and machines.

Subjects

STS.340 | STS.340 | ESD.52 | ESD.52 | Geography | Geography | systems | systems | manufacturing | manufacturing | communication | communication | management | management | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | nature | nature | electrification | electrification | mass production | mass production | industrialization | industrialization | war | war | military | military | Bell System | Bell System | nuclear | nuclear | cybernetics | cybernetics | flight | flight | Wright Brothers | Wright Brothers | aerospace | aerospace | gender | gender | airline | airline | reproduction | reproduction | computing | computing | internet | internet | computer | computer | electronics | electronics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | engineering | engineering | hobbyist | hobbyist | communications | communications | Internet | Internet | machine age | machine age | Apollo program | Apollo program | biotechnology | biotechnology | environment | environment

License

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STS.049J Technology and Gender in American History (MIT) STS.049J Technology and Gender in American History (MIT)

Description

This course centers on the changing relationships between men, women, and technology in American history. Topics include theories of gender, technologies of production and consumption, the gendering of public and private space, men's and women's roles in science and technology, the effects of industrialization on sexual divisions of labor, gender and identity at home and at work. This course centers on the changing relationships between men, women, and technology in American history. Topics include theories of gender, technologies of production and consumption, the gendering of public and private space, men's and women's roles in science and technology, the effects of industrialization on sexual divisions of labor, gender and identity at home and at work.

Subjects

history | history | gender | gender | american history | american history | technology | technology | history of technology | history of technology | culture | culture | identity | identity | twentieth century | twentieth century | modern | modern | industrialization | industrialization | demographics | demographics | women | women | systems | systems | modernity | modernity | STS.049 | STS.049

License

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course offers a comprehensive survey of world economic history, designed to introduce economics graduate students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. A final term paper is due at the end of the course. This course offers a comprehensive survey of world economic history, designed to introduce economics graduate students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. A final term paper is due at the end of the course.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses

License

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17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT) 17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT)

Description

At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death, At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death,

Subjects

Soviet Union | Soviet Union | politics | politics | communism | communism | history | history | socialist republics | socialist republics | world war two | world war two | stalin | stalin | khruschev | khruschev | brezhnev | brezhnev | october revolution | october revolution | political economy | political economy | lenin | lenin | industrialization | industrialization | collectivism | collectivism | repression | repression | society | society | culture | culture | Soviet system | Soviet system | U.S.S.R. | U.S.S.R. | Soviet society | Soviet society | political reform | political reform | social reform | social reform | revolutionary regime | revolutionary regime | Stalin revolution | Stalin revolution | post-Stalinist | post-Stalinist | Soviet collapse | Soviet collapse | political history | political history | 17.57 | 17.57 | 21H.467 | 21H.467

License

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | women authors | comfort women | comfort women | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | slave novel | slave novel | sensationalism | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | sentimentalism | realism | realism | postmodern fiction | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | American Revolution | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | Puritanism | SP.517 | SP.517 | WMN.517 | WMN.517

License

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | architecture | architecture | modernism | modernism | typology | typology | form | form | space | space | grid | grid | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | Kevin Lynch | Kevin Lynch | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | utopianism | utopianism | suburb | suburb | suburban development | suburban development

License

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class. Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology | mythology | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development | 4.241 | 4.241 | 11.330 | 11.330

License

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