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15.356 How to Develop "Breakthrough" Products and Services (MIT) 15.356 How to Develop "Breakthrough" Products and Services (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. To prosper, firms must develop major product and service innovations. Often, though, they don't know how. Recent research into the innovation process has made it possible to develop "breakthroughs" systematically. 15.356 presents several practical concept development methods, such as the "Lead User Method," where manufacturers learn from innovative customers. Expert guest speakers present case studies that show the "art" required to implement a concept development method. 15.356 is a half-term subject. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. To prosper, firms must develop major product and service innovations. Often, though, they don't know how. Recent research into the innovation process has made it possible to develop "breakthroughs" systematically. 15.356 presents several practical concept development methods, such as the "Lead User Method," where manufacturers learn from innovative customers. Expert guest speakers present case studies that show the "art" required to implement a concept development method. 15.356 is a half-term subject.

Subjects

lead user method; innovations; innovation process; idea generation; brainstorming; concept development methods; prototypes; solutions; problem solving; business breakthroughs; incremental improvements; market research; focus groups; MIT Media Lab; creativity | lead user method; innovations; innovation process; idea generation; brainstorming; concept development methods; prototypes; solutions; problem solving; business breakthroughs; incremental improvements; market research; focus groups; MIT Media Lab; creativity | lead user method | lead user method | innovations | innovations | innovation process | innovation process | idea generation | idea generation | brainstorming | brainstorming | concept development methods | concept development methods | prototypes | prototypes | solutions | solutions | problem solving | problem solving | business breakthroughs | business breakthroughs | incremental improvements | incremental improvements | market research | market research | focus groups | focus groups | MIT Media Lab | MIT Media Lab | creativity | creativity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT) STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT)

Description

In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist

Subjects

History | History | food | food | analysis | analysis | transform | transform | technological innovations | technological innovations | preserve | preserve | surplus | surplus | drying | drying | freezing | freezing | canning | canning | salting | salting | travel | travel | space | space | lived | lived | relations | relations | neighbors | neighbors | relatives | relatives | economic order | economic order | capitalism | capitalism | preservation | preservation | development | development | cultural | cultural | political | political | economic | economic | techno-scientific history | techno-scientific history | mass-production techniques | mass-production techniques | industrial farming initiatives | industrial farming initiatives | consumption | consumption | vertical integration | vertical integration | business firms | business firms | globalization | globalization | race | race | gender identities | gender identities | labor movements | labor movements | America | America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.356 How to Develop "Breakthrough" Products and Services (MIT)

Description

To prosper, firms must develop major product and service innovations. Often, though, they don't know how. Recent research into the innovation process has made it possible to develop "breakthroughs" systematically. 15.356 presents several practical concept development methods, such as the "Lead User Method," where manufacturers learn from innovative customers. Expert guest speakers present case studies that show the "art" required to implement a concept development method. 15.356 is a half-term subject.

Subjects

lead user method; innovations; innovation process; idea generation; brainstorming; concept development methods; prototypes; solutions; problem solving; business breakthroughs; incremental improvements; market research; focus groups; MIT Media Lab; creativity | lead user method | innovations | innovation process | idea generation | brainstorming | concept development methods | prototypes | solutions | problem solving | business breakthroughs | incremental improvements | market research | focus groups | MIT Media Lab | creativity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Barbara Askins, Chemist

Description

Subjects

xraytechnology | womanchemist | associationadvancementinventionsinnovations | barbarasaskins | nationalinventoryyear

License

No known copyright restrictions

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DE3K35 Information and Communication Technology in Business

Description

This unit is designed to allow candidates to develop competence in identifying, evaluating, managing and presenting business information to facilitate and influence decision-making. The unit requires that the candidate considers the role of information in the decision-making process, evaluates data communications systems and other new information and communications technology (ICT) innovations, uses planning and control tools for project management, and uses software application presentation tools to present findings and recommend actions.

Subjects

DE3K 35 | management information system | systems model | Attributes of information | ICT innovations | SCQF Level 8

License

Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Scottish Qualification Authority (SQA), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG) and SQA, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Scottish Qualification Authority (SQA), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG) and SQA, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17761/LicenceSQAMaterialsCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17761/LicenceSQAMaterialsCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 SQA

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STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT)

Description

In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist

Subjects

History | food | analysis | transform | technological innovations | preserve | surplus | drying | freezing | canning | salting | travel | space | lived | relations | neighbors | relatives | economic order | capitalism | preservation | development | cultural | political | economic | techno-scientific history | mass-production techniques | industrial farming initiatives | consumption | vertical integration | business firms | globalization | race | gender identities | labor movements | America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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