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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe. This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | Planning | Planning | water supply | water supply | sanitation | sanitation | developing countries | developing countries | sanitation technologies | sanitation technologies | service pricing | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | alternative institutional structures | privatization | privatization | consumer demand | consumer demand | community participation | community participation | planning processes | planning processes | environmental health | environmental health | public health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | low-income households | case studies | case studies | policy memos | policy memos | journals | journals | environment | environment | sustainability | sustainability | pollution | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs; the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development; determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government; evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions; and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors. This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs; the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development; determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government; evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions; and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors.

Subjects

basic economic concerns | basic economic concerns | political | political | institutional | institutional | and cultural factors | and cultural factors | decentralization in national economic reform programs | decentralization in national economic reform programs | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | political | institutional | and cultural factors | political | institutional | and cultural factors | developing countries | developing countries | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | economic development | economic development | balance sheets | balance sheets | fiscal gap | fiscal gap | revenues | revenues | expenditures | expenditures | budget deficits | budget deficits | inflation | inflation | public finance theory | public finance theory | efficiency | efficiency | optimal taxation | optimal taxation | optimal user fees | optimal user fees | basic microeconomic theory | basic microeconomic theory | equity | equity | incidence | incidence | general equilibrium model | general equilibrium model | property taxation | property taxation | tax reform | tax reform | intergovernmental fiscal relations | intergovernmental fiscal relations | fiscal federalism | fiscal federalism | decentralization | decentralization | transfers | transfers | international lending agencies | international lending agencies | programming assistance | programming assistance | conditionalities | conditionalities | public debt | public debt | structural adjustment | structural adjustment | private sector participation | private sector participation | microfinance | microfinance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | president | president | terror | terror | war | war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs, the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development, determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government, evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions, and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors. This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs, the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development, determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government, evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions, and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors.

Subjects

basic economic concerns | basic economic concerns | political | political | institutional | institutional | and cultural factors | and cultural factors | decentralization in national economic reform programs | decentralization in national economic reform programs | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | political | institutional | and cultural factors | political | institutional | and cultural factors | developing countries | developing countries | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | economic development | economic development | balance sheets | balance sheets | fiscal gap | fiscal gap | revenues | revenues | expenditures | expenditures | budget deficits | budget deficits | inflation | inflation | public finance theory | public finance theory | efficiency | efficiency | optimal taxation | optimal taxation | optimal user fees | optimal user fees | basic microeconomic theory | basic microeconomic theory | equity | equity | incidence | incidence | general equilibrium model | general equilibrium model | property taxation | property taxation | tax reform | tax reform | intergovernmental fiscal relations | intergovernmental fiscal relations | fiscal federalism | fiscal federalism | decentralization | decentralization | transfers | transfers | international lending agencies | international lending agencies | programming assistance | programming assistance | conditionalities | conditionalities | public debt | public debt | structural adjustment | structural adjustment | private sector participation | private sector participation | microfinance | microfinance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.676 Work, Employment, and Industrial Relations Theory (MIT) 15.676 Work, Employment, and Industrial Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar will cover the multi-disciplinary theoretical and empirical foundations of research on work, employment, labor markets, and industrial relations. We begin by tracing the historical development of theory and research in the field, paying special attention to how the normative premises, concepts, and methodological traditions of industrial relations compare to those of other disciplines that contribute to the study of work and employment relations. Then we will review a number of current theoretical and policy debates shaping the field. This will be followed by a series of modules introducing different disciplinary perspectives used to study work and employment issues today. Emphasis will be given to recent research from different industries that illustrate the mix of methods&md This seminar will cover the multi-disciplinary theoretical and empirical foundations of research on work, employment, labor markets, and industrial relations. We begin by tracing the historical development of theory and research in the field, paying special attention to how the normative premises, concepts, and methodological traditions of industrial relations compare to those of other disciplines that contribute to the study of work and employment relations. Then we will review a number of current theoretical and policy debates shaping the field. This will be followed by a series of modules introducing different disciplinary perspectives used to study work and employment issues today. Emphasis will be given to recent research from different industries that illustrate the mix of methods&md

Subjects

labor markets | labor markets | neo-classical labor economics | neo-classical labor economics | institutional labor economics | institutional labor economics | human resource management | human resource management | negotiations theory | negotiations theory | employment relations | employment relations | collective bargaining | collective bargaining | institutional labor market | institutional labor market | internal labor market | internal labor market

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.445 International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age (MIT) 17.445 International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. It considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. The course also highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. It considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. The course also highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | cyber age | cyber age | globalization | globalization | security | security | realism | realism | neorealism | neorealism | governance | governance | institutionalism | institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | cyberpolitics | cyberpolitics | war | war | international conflict | international conflict | global agenda | global agenda | international cooperation | international cooperation | peace | peace | global politics | global politics | power | power | cyberspace | cyberspace | systems | systems | international organization | international organization | cyber security | cyber security | world politics | world politics | networks | networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT) 21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds. Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds.

Subjects

Age of Reason | Age of Reason | philosophy | philosophy | cultural history | cultural history | intellectual history | intellectual history | History | History | western tradition | western tradition | Antiquity | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Renaissance | Renaissance | 1600 | 1600 | 1850 | 1850 | natural sciences | natural sciences | mathematics | mathematics | social theorists | social theorists | institutional reformers | institutional reformers | political revolutionaries | political revolutionaries | change | change | themselves | themselves | society | society | trials | trials | art | art | literature | literature | theater | theater | music | music | politics | politics | culture | culture | evolution | evolution | revolution. | revolution.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod

Subjects

medical imaging | medical imaging | medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | image signals | image signals | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge about brain function using fMRI are presented first to put the work in context. The course then provides in depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, building and applying statistical mod

Subjects

medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | image signals | image signals | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.212J An Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (MIT) 1.212J An Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (MIT)

Description

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) represent a major transition in transportation on many dimensions. This course considers ITS as a lens through which one can view many transportation and societal issues. ITS is an international program intended to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of surface transportation systems through advanced technologies in information systems, communications, and sensors. In the United States, ITS represents the major post-Interstate-era program for advancing surface transportation in highways and public transportation, and is potentially comparable to the air traffic control system in impact.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Powerpoint® software is recommended for viewing the .ppt files found on this course site. Free&#1 Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) represent a major transition in transportation on many dimensions. This course considers ITS as a lens through which one can view many transportation and societal issues. ITS is an international program intended to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of surface transportation systems through advanced technologies in information systems, communications, and sensors. In the United States, ITS represents the major post-Interstate-era program for advancing surface transportation in highways and public transportation, and is potentially comparable to the air traffic control system in impact.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Powerpoint® software is recommended for viewing the .ppt files found on this course site. Free&#1

Subjects

intelligent transportation systems | intelligent transportation systems | ITS | ITS | technological systems | technological systems | institutional aspects of ITS | institutional aspects of ITS | system architecture | system architecture | congestion pricing | congestion pricing | public | public | Surface transportation systems | Surface transportation systems | information systems | information systems | communications | communications | sensors | sensors | post-Interstate | post-Interstate | highways | highways | public transportation | public transportation | network models | network models | 1.212 | 1.212 | ESD.221 | ESD.221

License

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrialized nations | industrialized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business | aging | aging | population | population | countries | countries | developing | developing | development | development | industrial | industrial | industrialized | industrialized | nations | nations | politics | politics | political | political | theory | theory | sustainable | sustainable | public | public | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | economies | economies | transition | transition | growth | growth | institutions | institutions | institutional | institutional | trade | trade | international | international

License

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STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT) STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This class will study some of the changing ideas within modern physics, ranging from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to solid-state physics, nuclear and elementary particles, and cosmology. These ideas will be situated within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts. The overall aim is to understand the changing roles of physics and of physicists over the course of the twentieth century. This class will study some of the changing ideas within modern physics, ranging from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to solid-state physics, nuclear and elementary particles, and cosmology. These ideas will be situated within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts. The overall aim is to understand the changing roles of physics and of physicists over the course of the twentieth century.

Subjects

relativity theory | relativity theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | solid-state physics | solid-state physics | elementary particles | elementary particles | quarks | quarks | cosmology | cosmology | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | Maxwell | Maxwell | Mach | Mach | Bohr | Bohr | Heisenberg | Heisenberg | McCarthyism | McCarthyism | Poincar? | Poincar? | Schr?dinger | Schr?dinger | nuclear particles | nuclear particles | physics | physics | 20th century | 20th century | twentieth century | twentieth century | physicists | physicists | institutional | political | cultural context | institutional | political | cultural context | STS.042 | STS.042 | 8.225 | 8.225

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17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations.The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyses the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations.The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyses the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | presiden | presiden | terror; war | terror; war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security | terror | terror | war | war

License

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

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17.552 Political Economy of Chinese Reform (MIT) 17.552 Political Economy of Chinese Reform (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on China's transition from plan to market. What has the trajectory of institutional change in China been, and how has growth been achieved? Is that growth sustainable? Subject examines specific aspects of reform (enterprise, fiscal, financial, social welfare), and the systemic consequences of interaction between various reform measures. Additional topics include the interaction between political and economic change, the transformation of state-society relations, and the generalizability of China's reform experience. Graduate students are expected to explore the subject in greater depth. This course focuses on China's transition from plan to market. What has the trajectory of institutional change in China been, and how has growth been achieved? Is that growth sustainable? Subject examines specific aspects of reform (enterprise, fiscal, financial, social welfare), and the systemic consequences of interaction between various reform measures. Additional topics include the interaction between political and economic change, the transformation of state-society relations, and the generalizability of China's reform experience. Graduate students are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.

Subjects

China | China | China's transition from plan to market | China's transition from plan to market | institutional change in China | enterprise | institutional change in China | enterprise | fiscal | fiscal | financial | financial | social welfare | social welfare | reform | reform

License

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17.556 Political Economy of Development (MIT) 17.556 Political Economy of Development (MIT)

Description

This course examines theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the process of late development. Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. How over the past century have some of the world's poorest nations achieved wealth? How have others remained mired in poverty? What are the social consequences for alternative strategies of development? This course examines theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the process of late development. Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. How over the past century have some of the world's poorest nations achieved wealth? How have others remained mired in poverty? What are the social consequences for alternative strategies of development?

Subjects

poverty | poverty | theoretical and empirical approaches | theoretical and empirical approaches | development | the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty | development | the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty | the politics of industrial policy and planning | the politics of industrial policy and planning | relationship between institutional change and growth | relationship between institutional change and growth | social consequences for alternative strategies of development | social consequences for alternative strategies of development

License

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4.163J Urban Design Studio: Providence (MIT) 4.163J Urban Design Studio: Providence (MIT)

Description

This studio discusses in great detail the design of urban environments, specifically in Providence, RI. It will propose strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development: all are topics covered in the studio. The course integrates architecture and planning students in joint work and requires individual designs and planning guidelines as a final product. This studio discusses in great detail the design of urban environments, specifically in Providence, RI. It will propose strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development: all are topics covered in the studio. The course integrates architecture and planning students in joint work and requires individual designs and planning guidelines as a final product.

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | community | community | stakeholders | stakeholders | development | development | urban growth | urban growth | Providence | Providence | Rhode Island | Rhode Island | institutional mechanisms | institutional mechanisms | housing | housing | waterfront | waterfront | port | port | built form | built form | public space | public space | landscape | landscape | path and access systems | path and access systems | parking | parking | density | density | activity location and intensity | activity location and intensity | planning | planning | finance | finance | public/private partnerships | public/private partnerships | parcelization | parcelization | phasing | phasing | multi-disciplinary teams | multi-disciplinary teams | 4.163 | 4.163 | 11.332 | 11.332

License

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1.201J Transportation Systems Analysis: Demand and Economics (MIT) 1.201J Transportation Systems Analysis: Demand and Economics (MIT)

Description

The main objective of this course is to give broad insight into the different facets of transportation systems, while providing a solid introduction to transportation demand and cost analyses. As part of the core in the Master of Science in Transportation program, the course will not focus on a specific transportation mode but will use the various modes to apply the theoretical and analytical concepts presented in the lectures and readings. Introduces transportation systems analysis, stressing demand and economic aspects. Covers the key principles governing transportation planning, investment, operations and maintenance. Introduces the microeconomic concepts central to transportation systems. Topics covered include economic theories of the firm, the consumer, and the market, demand models, The main objective of this course is to give broad insight into the different facets of transportation systems, while providing a solid introduction to transportation demand and cost analyses. As part of the core in the Master of Science in Transportation program, the course will not focus on a specific transportation mode but will use the various modes to apply the theoretical and analytical concepts presented in the lectures and readings. Introduces transportation systems analysis, stressing demand and economic aspects. Covers the key principles governing transportation planning, investment, operations and maintenance. Introduces the microeconomic concepts central to transportation systems. Topics covered include economic theories of the firm, the consumer, and the market, demand models,

Subjects

1.201 | 1.201 | 11.545 | 11.545 | ESD.210 | ESD.210 | transportation | transportation | travel demand | travel demand | organizational models | organizational models | consumer theory | consumer theory | project finance | project finance | intelligent transportation systems | intelligent transportation systems | project evaluation | project evaluation | demand modelling | demand modelling | technology | technology | environmental | environmental | energy | energy | economic development | economic development | sustainability | sustainability | urban structure | urban structure | land use | land use | equity | equity | transportation components | transportation components | intermodal combinations | intermodal combinations | quantitative modeling | quantitative modeling | strategic regional planning | strategic regional planning | institutional change analysis | institutional change analysis | large-scale systems | large-scale systems

License

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1.201J Introduction to Transportation Systems (MIT) 1.201J Introduction to Transportation Systems (MIT)

Description

1.201J/11.545J/ESD.210J is required for all first-year Master of Science in Transportation students. It would be of interest to, as well as accessible to, students in Urban Studies and Planning, Political Science, Technology and Policy, Management, and various engineering departments. It is a good subject for those who plan to take only one subject in transportation and serves as an entry point to other transportation subjects as well. The subject focuses on fundamental principles of transportation systems, introduces transportation systems components and networks, and addresses how one invests in and operates them effectively. The tie between transportation and related systems is emphasized. 1.201J/11.545J/ESD.210J is required for all first-year Master of Science in Transportation students. It would be of interest to, as well as accessible to, students in Urban Studies and Planning, Political Science, Technology and Policy, Management, and various engineering departments. It is a good subject for those who plan to take only one subject in transportation and serves as an entry point to other transportation subjects as well. The subject focuses on fundamental principles of transportation systems, introduces transportation systems components and networks, and addresses how one invests in and operates them effectively. The tie between transportation and related systems is emphasized.

Subjects

1.201 | 1.201 | 11.545 | 11.545 | ESD.210 | ESD.210 | transportation | technology | environmental | energy | economic development | sustainability | urban structure | land use | equity | transportation components | modes | intermodal combinations | quantitative modeling | strategic regional planning | institutional change analysis | CLIOS | large-scale systems | transportation | technology | environmental | energy | economic development | sustainability | urban structure | land use | equity | transportation components | modes | intermodal combinations | quantitative modeling | strategic regional planning | institutional change analysis | CLIOS | large-scale systems

License

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1.212J An Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (MIT) 1.212J An Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (MIT)

Description

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) represent a major transition in transportation on many dimensions. This course considers ITS as a lens through which one can view many transportation and societal issues. ITS is an international program intended to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of surface transportation systems through advanced technologies in information systems, communications, and sensors. In the United States, ITS represents the major post-Interstate-era program for advancing surface transportation in highways and public transportation, and is potentially comparable to the air traffic control system in impact. The readings for the class come primarily from the instructor's own text: Sussman, Joseph. Perspectives on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). New York, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) represent a major transition in transportation on many dimensions. This course considers ITS as a lens through which one can view many transportation and societal issues. ITS is an international program intended to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of surface transportation systems through advanced technologies in information systems, communications, and sensors. In the United States, ITS represents the major post-Interstate-era program for advancing surface transportation in highways and public transportation, and is potentially comparable to the air traffic control system in impact. The readings for the class come primarily from the instructor's own text: Sussman, Joseph. Perspectives on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). New York,

Subjects

intelligent transportation systems | intelligent transportation systems | ITS | ITS | technological systems | technological systems | institutional aspects of ITS | institutional aspects of ITS | system architecture | system architecture | congestion pricing | congestion pricing | public | public | Surface transportation systems | Surface transportation systems | information systems | information systems | communications | communications | sensors | sensors | post-Interstate | post-Interstate | highways | highways | public transportation | public transportation | network models | network models | 1.212 | 1.212 | ESD.221 | ESD.221 | public partnerships | public partnerships | private partnerships | private partnerships | industrial policy | industrial policy

License

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11.522 Research Seminar on Urban Information Systems (MIT) 11.522 Research Seminar on Urban Information Systems (MIT)

Description

Seminar participants and invited guests will lead critical discussions of current literature and ongoing research. Each student will be responsible for identifying, reviewing, and presenting one structured discussion of articles from the current literature that are relevant to their research topic. The remaining time will be spent working on individual projects or thesis proposals. This fall, the seminar will focus on the following core issues that underlie most implementations of urban information systems and decision support tools: the sustainable acquisition and representation of urban knowledge; the emergent technological infrastructure for supporting metropolitan decision-making; and the innovative organizational and institutional arrangements that can take advantage of modern urban i Seminar participants and invited guests will lead critical discussions of current literature and ongoing research. Each student will be responsible for identifying, reviewing, and presenting one structured discussion of articles from the current literature that are relevant to their research topic. The remaining time will be spent working on individual projects or thesis proposals. This fall, the seminar will focus on the following core issues that underlie most implementations of urban information systems and decision support tools: the sustainable acquisition and representation of urban knowledge; the emergent technological infrastructure for supporting metropolitan decision-making; and the innovative organizational and institutional arrangements that can take advantage of modern urban i

Subjects

communication technologies | communication technologies | geographic information systems | geographic information systems | multimedia technologies | multimedia technologies | institutional analysis | institutional analysis | prototyping | prototyping | urban planning tools | urban planning tools | metropolitan information infrastructure | metropolitan information infrastructure | emergent technological infrastructure | emergent technological infrastructure | representing urban knowledge | representing urban knowledge

License

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it evaluates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe. This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it evaluates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning | planning | water supply | water supply | sanitation | sanitation | developing countries | developing countries | sanitation technologies | sanitation technologies | service pricing | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | alternative institutional structures | privatization | privatization | consumer demand | consumer demand | community participation | community participation | planning processes | planning processes | environmental health | environmental health | public health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | low-income households | case studies | case studies | policy memos | policy memos | journals | journals | environment | environment | sustainability | sustainability | pollution | pollution

License

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11.467J Property Rights in Transition (MIT) 11.467J Property Rights in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course examines the theories and policy debates over who can own real property, how to communicate and enforce property rights, and the range of liberties that they confer. It explores alternative economic, political, and sociological perspectives of property rights and their policy and planning implications. This course examines the theories and policy debates over who can own real property, how to communicate and enforce property rights, and the range of liberties that they confer. It explores alternative economic, political, and sociological perspectives of property rights and their policy and planning implications.

Subjects

property | property | property law | property law | international law | international law | ownership | ownership | migration | migration | poverty | poverty | wealth | wealth | power | power | social values | social values | social classes | social classes | regime change | regime change | economics | economics | institutional perspectives | institutional perspectives | real estate | real estate | natural resources | natural resources | sustainability | sustainability | 11.467 | 11.467 | 4.257 | 4.257 | 17.550 | 17.550

License

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